GRA
Posts: 9398
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: AFV Truck/Commercial Vehicle and (non-BEV) Bus thread

Sat Jun 23, 2018 2:52 pm

Via GCC:
Ferguson Marine and partners to develop renewables-powered hydrogen ferry: EU-funded HySeas III project
http://www.greencarcongress.com/2018/06/20180622-hyseas.html

Port Glasgow-based Ferguson Marine Engineering Limited has successfully led a European consortium in a bid for EU funding support for the building and launch of the first sea-going car and passenger ferry fueled by Hydrogen.

The supported development is expected to cost around €12.6 million (US$14.6 million) of which €9.3 million (US$10.8 million) has been awarded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation fund. The vessel’s fuel will be produced from renewable electricity marking a paradigm shift towards entirely emissions-free marine transport. . . .

The initial objective is to construct and prove the vessel’s modular drive train onshore, testing for stress and durability under conditions employing real-world data from existing vessels. Hydrogen produced from renewable electricity will be used to fuel Ballard FCveloCity-HD 100-kilowatt fuel cell power modules, which will provide zero-emission primary propulsion power for the ferry. Ballard plans to supply 7 of its modules to power the ferry, with the first modules expected to be shipped in 2018. . . .

A successful test will allow a vessel to be constructed, in the already assured knowledge that such a vessel can operate safely and efficiently around Scotland’s challenging coast. The vessel is planned to operate in and around Orkney, which is already producing hydrogen in volume from constrained—and hence otherwise wasted—renewable energy.

In 2012, Ferguson launched the MV Hallaig, the first battery hybrid ferry. The redeveloped yard achieved another first in November 2017 when it launched the MV Glen Sannox, the first UK ferry build with dual-fuel capability (marine diesel & LNG). The Glen Sannox’ sister vessel is currently under construction at the shipyard. . . .
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 9398
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: AFV Truck/Commercial Vehicle and (non-BEV) Bus thread

Mon Jun 25, 2018 6:05 pm

Via GCC:
CARB awards $20M in Cap-and-Trade funding to zero-emission transportation technology demos, H2 ferry, BEV locomotive
http://www.greencarcongress.com/2018/06/20180625-arb.html

. . . Three projects demonstrate zero-emission cargo-handling equipment:

    Fuel-cell powered top loader with wireless inductive charging at the Port of Los Angeles (Project cost: $8.8 million; Cap-and-Trade grant: $6.5 million; Grantee: Center for Transportation and the Environment).

    Three battery-electric top handlers and two zero-emission yard trucks (fuel cell and battery-electric) at the Port of Long Beach (Cost $8.3 million; Grant: $5.3 million; Grantee: City of Long Beach Harbor Department).

    Two battery-electric high lift-capacity forklifts at the Port of Stockton (Cost: $1.2 million; Grant: $772,555; Grantee: San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District).
Other projects include:

    Battery-electric switcher locomotive at the Port of Los Angeles (Cost: $3.8 million; Grant: $2.8 million; Grantee: The Los Angeles Harbor Department).

    Hydrogen fuel cell passenger ferry in the Bay Area (Cost: $5.5 million; Grant: $3 million; Grantee: Bay Area Air Quality Management District).

    Four battery-electric tractors and one battery-electric Class 6 truck that will act as a mobile recharger in the San Joaquin Valley (Cost: $2.3 million; Grant: $1.5 million; Grantee: Project Clean Air).

All projects will be completed [Sic. The CARB press release says "will have met required project demonstration milestones"] by March 2020.

There are renderings of the FCEV top loader and the BEV forklift.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 9398
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: AFV Truck/Commercial Vehicle and (non-BEV) Bus thread

Wed Jun 27, 2018 7:02 pm

Via GCC:
ABB & Ballard Power Systems partner to develop MW-scale fuel cell power plant for shipping industry
http://www.greencarcongress.com/2018/06/20180627-abb.html

. . . ABB and Ballard Power Systems will leverage the existing kilowatt-scale fuel cell technologies and optimize them to create a pioneering megawatt-scale solution suitable for powering larger ships. With an electrical generating capacity of 3MW (4000 HP), the new system will fit within a single module no bigger in size than a traditional marine engine running on fossil fuels. . . .

Fuel cell systems can have various applications for vessels, such as providing power for a ship’s hotel operations during the time of docking, or for powering the propulsion when ships are at sea. During the initial phase, the collaboration will focus on the development of fuel cell power systems for passenger vessels. . . .


Also GCC:
Ability Tri-Modal deploys 5 Orange EV electric yard trucks to Carson operations
http://www.greencarcongress.com/2018/06/20180626-ability.html

range EV and Ability Tri-Modal Transportation Services announced the deployment of five Orange EV T-Series pure-electric terminal trucks to three of Tri-Modal’s warehousing and distribution facilities—a combined 750,000 square feet of warehouse space close to the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach.

Ability Tri-Modal uses ten terminal tractors for yard management, which operate up to 20 hours per day, five days a week. . . .

Ability Tri-Modal utilized funding from the Hybrid and Zero-Emission Truck and Bus Voucher Incentive Project (HVIP) to purchase the Orange EV trucks. HVIP is currently open, offering incentive amounts of up to $175,000 per Orange EV terminal truck.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 9398
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: AFV Truck/Commercial Vehicle and (non-BEV) Bus thread

Mon Jul 02, 2018 6:32 pm

Via ABG:
Mercedes-Benz unveils zero-emissions electric vans, fuel-cell concept
The eVito urban delivery van will go on sale this fall
https://www.autoblog.com/2018/07/02/mercedes-benz-electric-vans-fuel-cell/

Mercedes-Benz is further detailing plans for its electrified cargo vans, saying its battery-electric eVito will go on sale this fall, followed by the the larger eSprinter van in 2019. It's also debuting a concept fuel-cell version of the latter large van for longer-range applications.

The eVito is geared for urban delivery routes, tradespeople or service technicians and will be available in two wheelbase lengths — 202 inches or 211 inches, with maximum payloads of 2,365 pounds or 2,310 lbs, respectively, and cargo volume of between 19.7 and 21.7 cubic feet. With a 41 kilowatt-hour battery pack, it's good for 112 horsepower and 221 pound-feet of torque, with a top speed of 50 miles per hour or 75 mph, depending on how it's configured, around 150 kilometers (93 miles) of range and is fully chargeable in six hours. It goes on sale right after the IAA Commercial Vehicles show in Hannover in September, though the company's U.S. sales plans are unclear.

We recently wrote about the larger eSprinter, which comes to the market next year. It will come in two battery options — a 41 kWh battery with 71.5 miles of range, or a 55 kWh setup with 93 miles of range, fully charged in six or eight hours, respectively, or 80 percent charged in 45 minutes with a DC fast charger. Overall gross vehicle weight is 7,716 pounds, with payloads of 2,293 pounds and 1,984 pounds, respectively.

Mercedes is using a semi-integrated motorhome as the basis for its Concept Sprinter F-Cell, which combines fuel cell and battery technology in a plug-in hybrid configuration that boasts 197 hp and 258 lb-ft of torque. It boasts three tanks with a total capacity for 9.9 pounds of hydrogen and 186 miles of range, with the possibility of adding a fourth tank to the rear to extend range to 329 miles if needed, making the fuel-cell vehicle ideal for anything from urban deliveries to longer courier routes or inter-urban minibuses. . . .
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 9398
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: AFV Truck/Commercial Vehicle and (non-BEV) Bus thread

Sat Jul 07, 2018 1:33 pm

Via GCC:
BYD introducing battery-electric Class 6 stepvan in US
http://www.greencarcongress.com/2018/07/20180706-byd.html

. . . The BYD 6D Step Van is expected to hit the streets by early 2019.

The BYD 6D is suited for delivering items such as parcels, linens, food, beverages, office supplies, and other consumer goods. With . . . a 120-mile range (full load). . . .

The 250 kW motor delivers 1800 N·m; top speed is 70 mph. The 221 kWh battery pack can charge in 4.5 hours on AC, 1.5 hours DC.


Also GCC:
Daimler Trucks hands over 10 FUSO eCanter battery-electric trucks to Lisbon
http://www.greencarcongress.com/2018/07/20180707-daimler.html

. . . As a 7.5 tonne-vehicle, the FUSO eCanter has a range of around 100 km (62 miles). The city of Lisbon uses the vehicles for municipal gardening trips and for waste disposal. . . .

This means that since 2017, the FUSO eCanter is now in use in six cities around the world in Tokyo, New York, Berlin, London, Amsterdam as well as Lisbon.


Also GCC:
Sandia-led team designs feasible hydrogen fuel-cell coastal research vessel; implications for large hydrogen-fueled vessels
http://www.greencarcongress.com/2018/07/20180703-sandia.html

Sandia National Laboratories partnered with the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, the naval architect firm Glosten and the class society DNV GL to assess the technical, regulatory and economic feasibility of a hydrogen fuel-cell coastal research vessel.

A report released this month shows it is technically and economically feasible to build such a vessel in a manner consistent with marine regulations. The project team nicknamed the vessel the “Zero-V,” short for zero-emissions research vessel.

The report found feasible a 10-knot vessel with 2400 nautical mile range, able to perform 14 Scripps science missions, that could be refueled with liquid hydrogen at 4 different ports of call along the US west coast.

An integrated fuel-cell electric plant supplemented with small lithium-ion bridging batteries provides both propulsion and ship service electrical. The fuel cells are Hydrogenics HyPM HD 30 fuel-cell power modules arranged into power racks with each rack holding six fuel-cell modules, with total power output of 180 kW.

With ten racks total, the vessel has 1,800 kW of installed power. The 10 hydrogen fuel-cell racks are evenly distributed between Starboard and Port fuel cell rooms, allowing the vessel to continue operation at reduced power if one space must be taken out of service for maintenance. The fuel cells provide DC power, which must be conditioned, converted and inverted to provide bus DC and AC power, respectively. . . .

The Zero-V uses one propulsion motor to power each of its two propellers. Based on the resistance and powering calculations, the team determined that 500 kW motors provide sufficient power for the various mission requirements and also have enough reserve power for safe operation in heavy seas and for dynamic positioning.

High-torque alternating current (AC) permanent magnet type motors were selected as the propulsion motors. These motors can be directly coupled to the propeller shaft to provide efficient and quiet operation.

To reduce weight, the vessel has to be constructed of aluminum. The beam and length requirements were driven by the requirement that the vessel be able to dock at all primary ports of call for the vessel.

CO2(eq.) and criteria pollutant (smog) emissions were estimated for the Zero-V based on a complete “well-to-waves” (WTW) analysis. The annual WTW CO2(eq.) emissions from the Zero-V fueled with LH2 from fossil natural gas (NG) would be 2.16 Gigagrams (Gg) of CO2 (eq.) per year, produced entirely by the production and delivery of the LH2 fuel.

This is slightly worse than the equivalent vessel running on fossil diesel, with WTW CO2(eq.) emissions of 1.91 Gg CO2 (eq.)/year, despite the fact that the fuel-cell-powered Zero-V is 22% more energy efficient than the equivalent diesel vessel
. This WTW CO2(eq.) emission increase is due to the facts that making hydrogen from NG is energy-intensive in the first place, the carbon in NG is released into the atmosphere as CO2 during the hydrogen manufacturing process, and hydrogen liquefaction involves significant energy and associated emissions.

    The situation is dramatically improved using renewable hydrogen, such as that made from biogas, or by water electrolysis using wind or low-carbon nuclear power. Our analysis shows the annual WTW CO2(eq.) emissions from the Zero-V using renewable LH2 becomes 0.164 Gg CO2 (eq.)/year. This is 91.4% less than the WTW CO2(eq.) emissions from the equivalent diesel vessel running on conventional diesel fuel.

    In our discussions with the gas suppliers Linde and Air Products, renewable LH2 can be made available to the Zero-V today in the quantities required
    . The gas suppliers are currently working to make renewable hydrogen more broadly available.

    Summarizing the CO2(eq.) results, hydrogen PEM fuel-cell technology can dramatically reduce the CO2(eq.) emissions from operation of the Zero-V. However, nearly 100% renewable hydrogen must be used to achieve the desired deep cuts in CO2(eq.) emissions that are commensurate with the challenge presented by increased levels of infra-red radiation trapping gases in the atmosphere.

    —Sandia report

The fuel-cell technology can significantly reduce WTW NOx and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions below the most advanced Tier 4 criteria pollutant emissions requirements, regardless of whether the hydrogen is made by NG reforming or using more renewable means.

No “show-stopping” issues were identified by either DNV GL or the United States Coast Guard. The feasibility of the Zero-V, as well as the ability to refuel it with ~ 11,000 kg of hydrogen, has implications for large hydrogen fueled vessels such as cargo vessels and cruise ships. The work was funded by the Maritime Administration (MARAD) within the US Department of Transportation.

One of the biggest additional benefits of using hydrogen to power a boat is the absence of ecologically damaging fuel spills. According to Sandia chemist and project lead Lennie Klebanoff, it is impossible to have a polluting hydrogen spill on the water. More buoyant than helium, hydrogen rises on its own and eventually escapes into outer space. . . .

Fuel cells generate water so pure that the ship’s crew can drink it (with conditioning), or use it for scientific experiments, reducing the need to desalinate seawater (which currently consumes large amounts of energy). . . .

The Zero-V project evolved from earlier Sandia work on the SF-BREEZE, a hydrogen-powered passenger ferry designed to operate in the San Francisco Bay.

Whereas the SF-BREEZE requires refueling after 100 miles, the Zero-V can go at least 2,400 miles or 15 days before requiring a refuel; enough to get from San Diego to Hawaii. Given the great distances it needs to travel, a refueling terminal in one central location isn’t what is needed. The Sandia team found an innovative approach that allows liquid hydrogen suppliers to drive fuel trucks directly to the ship at ports of call. Thus, the Zero-V would require little investment in fueling infrastructure.

In addition to the aforementioned requirements, Glosten’s Sean Caughlan said finding a way to store the heavy hydrogen tanks while accommodating at least 18 scientists, 11 crew members and three laboratories was a challenge.

Part of the solution was selecting a trimaran boat design—a design with three parallel hulls, usually used for high-speed boats. The design offers a great deal of space above deck for the tanks, and adequate below-deck space for other science instrumentation and machinery.

The team designed the Zero-V using proven, commercially available hydrogen technology so they could be sure it would work. Once completed, the vessel design was reviewed by DNV GL and the U.S. Coast Guard. Both regulatory bodies independently came to the same conclusion: there are no “show-stopping” technical issues with the Zero-V design.

DNV GL hydrogen expert Gerd Petra Haugom says the Zero-V design shows an essential understanding of the safety-related properties of hydrogen, and how it can be used safely and securely on a vessel. . . .

The next step for the Zero-V is finding the funding to build it. Compared to diesel-powered research vessels, the Zero-V has a similar capital cost, but would cost roughly 7% more to operate and maintain. Given its benefits—much quieter, zero emissions and no risk of polluting fuel spills—Bruce Appelgate, who oversees the Scripps fleet, is hoping that like-minded donors will step up to support the project.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 9398
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: AFV Truck/Commercial Vehicle and (non-BEV) Bus thread

Tue Jul 10, 2018 6:17 pm

Via GCC:
ULEMCo working on hydrogen-fueled marine engines
http://www.greencarcongress.com/2018/07/20180709-ulemco.html

UK-based ULEMCo, a hydrogen commercial vehicle conversion company, is looking into options for the marine sector for its technology (earlier post), and is developing a demonstration marine engine modified to run on hydrogen as a partner in the HYLANTIC (Atlantic Network for Renewable Generation and Supply of Hydrogen to promote High Energy Efficiency) project.

The the overall aim of the project is to show that a cost-effective and practical hydrogen engine solution could be deployed across a range of existing vessel applications, and therefore contribute to reducing emissions in local ports and inland waterways.

In addition to the engine development work, a feasibility study will also be carried out to assess the sources of hydrogen locally in the Liverpool City Region that would be suitable for marine applications, where opportunities could exist for vessels such as those used for the Mersey Ferry and the Manchester Ship Canal. . . .

HYLANTIC is funded by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) through the Interreg Atlantic Area Program with a budget of €2.5 million.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 9398
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: AFV Truck/Commercial Vehicle and (non-BEV) Bus thread

Wed Jul 11, 2018 6:35 pm

Via GCC:
First customers order the Mercedes-Benz eCitaro bus, deliveries this year; solid-state batteries, fuel-cell range-extender coming
http://www.greencarcongress.com/2018/07/20180711-ecitaro.html

The Rhein-Neckar-Verkehr GmbH, operator of the local public transport system in the Rhine-Neckar metropolitan region, signed a corresponding declaration of intent with the Daimler subsidiary EvoBus GmbH. Series production of the Mercedes-Benz Citaro with all-electric drive will then begin at the end of the year at the Mannheim bus plant. The transport operators in Hamburg and Berlin have already ordered a total of 35 eCitaro buses. . . .

Lithium-ion batteries with a total capacity of up to about 243 kWh provide the power for the eCitaro. The batteries are divided between as many as ten modules, each supplying around 25 kWh.

In addition to two battery modules on the vehicle roof, the standard equipment includes four battery modules in the rear of the bus. Depending upon customer requirements, another two or four battery modules are mounted on the roof of the eCitaro. With a minimum of six and up to a maximum of ten possible battery modules, transport operators can adapt their usage and charging strategy very precisely to individual needs.

With the maximum complement of ten battery modules, the eCitaro in standard specification weighs around 13.44 tonnes. In conjunction with a gross vehicle weight rating of 19.5 tonnes, this corresponds to a payload of more than six tonnes or around 88 passengers—in line with what is needed in practice even during rush hour. . . .

For the start of series production, plug-in charging is intended. To this end, the city bus has a connection for a Combo 2 plug. If opportunity charging is required to extend the range, there will also be an option to charge the eCitaro via a pantograph in future.

However, the battery capacity alone provides little indication of the actual performance capability and, above all, the range of an all-electric city bus—the true measure is that of energy consumption. In the case of a city bus, this is impacted significantly by climatic conditions and consequently by the need to cool and, above all, to heat the interior. . . .

Compared with the current Citaro with combustion engine, the energy requirement for heating, ventilation and climate control has fallen by about 40% in the eCitaro. . . .

According to the SORT2 standardized city driving cycle, the Citaro with a full complement of Samsung NMC Li-ion batteries should be able to achieve an operating range of around 150 kilometers (93 miles) in the summer. In other words, it is already possible to serve some sub-networks within the daily workload of a city bus without opportunity charging.

Without opportunity charging, the eCitaro already covers about one third of all requirements of the transport operators. Under ideal conditions, the eCitaro even drives around 250 kilometers (155 miles) without opportunity charging.

The eCitaro is designed to be transitioned to future battery technology. The next generation of the eCitaro, using the next generation of Samsung NMC technology, will then cover around 50% of all applications. This greater battery capacity also makes a meaningful introduction of an eCitaro G articulated bus with a reasonable range possible.

Additional development steps are already mapped out, including the use of lithium-polymer solid-state batteries from Blue Solutions, a subsidiary of Bolloré Grop, which are characterized by a particularly long service life as well as high energy density. With a rated battery capacity of about 400 kWh in the solo bus and even more in the articulated bus, the eCitaro will then meet about 70% of all requirements without opportunity charging.

Subsequently, the range of the eCitaro will be increased yet again by a fuel-cell range-extender. It will be designed to allow the eCitaro to fulfil nearly 100% of all requirements on city buses. This technology eliminates the need for opportunity charging and the complex infrastructure required for it in almost all cases—the eCitaro will be able to replace city buses with combustion engine virtually one to one. . . .

Public funding supports development. The development of a marketable city bus transport system using solely battery power takes place via the “SAEBEL” project, funded by the German Federal Ministry of Transport and Digital Infrastructure as part of the electric mobility funding policy with a total of €1.85 million. . . .
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 9398
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: AFV Truck/Commercial Vehicle and (non-BEV) Bus thread

Mon Jul 16, 2018 7:34 pm

All via GCC:
Parisian hydrogen-powered taxi fleet reaches 100 vehicles; targeting 600 by 2020
http://www.greencarcongress.com/2018/07/20180713-hype.html

. . . Hype’s founder, Mathieu Gardies, received the keys to 25 new hydrogen-powered Toyota Mirai cars from the CEO of Toyota France, Didier Gambart . . . .

This delivery is a new stage in the deployment of the world’s first hydrogen-powered taxi fleet, which will compridse 600 vehicles by the end of 2020. Air Liquide continues to support the growth of the “Hype” fleet by building up the necessary network of hydrogen refueling stations.

An unfortunate choice of acronym, at least in English. Supposedly stands for HYdrogen Powered Electric, run by STEP (the Societe du Taxi Electrique Parisien). They started off with five iX35 (Tucson FCEVs) back in Dec. 2015, and are looking to have 200 vehicles in service by the end of this year.


Canada awarding $25K to project to develop rail engine capable of running on blends of hydrogen and diesel
http://www.greencarcongress.com/2018/07/20180713-canada.html

Canada’s Minister of Transport . . . announced an investment of $25,000 for a University of Windsor project called “Hydrogen Enabled Low-Emissions and Fuel Efficient Diesel Engine Combustion Technology for Clean Locomotives”.

The project will help to develop an experimental diesel engine that is capable of running on blends of hydrogen and diesel fuel. This technology has the potential to reduce air pollution from rail diesel engines significantly.

The award is under Canada’s Clean Rail Academic Grant Program. . . .

Also under this round of awards, the University of Waterloo will receive funding for a hydrogen hybrid locomotive, while the University of British Columbia will receive funding for a Hardware-in-the-loop simulation of hybrid hydrogen fuel cell/battery powertrains under real railway duty cycles.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 9398
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: AFV Truck/Commercial Vehicle and (non-BEV) Bus thread

Tue Jul 17, 2018 6:56 pm

Via GCC:
El Dorado fuel cell electric buses complete Altoona testing, eligible for $300K HVIP voucher in California
http://www.greencarcongress.com/2018/07/20180717-enc.html

El Dorado National fuel cell electric buses (FCEBs), using BAE System’s Series Hybrid technology with Ballard FCveloCity-HD fuel cell system modules, recently completed rigorous testing at The Altoona Bus Research and Testing Center under a program established by the Federal Transit Administration (FTA).

El Dorado National (ENC) is the first bus manufacturer to complete the rigorous 12 year / 500,000-mile life cycle Altoona testing of a hydrogen fuel cell transit bus.

    . . . With the ability to refuel within 20 minutes and a proven transit duty cycle range of over 200 miles, the Axess FCEV is the only zero-emission transit bus that can seamlessly integrate into existing transit fleets.

    — Mike Ammann, Vice President of Sales for El Dorado. . . .

El Dorado National has produced 20 FCEBs in its Riverside, California plant, all powered by Ballard in collaboration with BAE Systems, under the American Fuel Cell Bus (AFCB) program. The latest version of El Dorado National’s Axess FCEB offers additional hydrogen storage, thereby extending the range beyond 300 miles.

There are currently 21 FCEBs in operation with several transit agencies in California, some with many years of revenue service. . . .

Accelerated independent testing is far better than nothing (or relying on manufacturer's lies), but now its time for the real-world test, the only one that ultimately matters.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 9398
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: AFV Truck/Commercial Vehicle and (non-BEV) Bus thread

Wed Jul 18, 2018 6:40 pm

Via GCC:
BYD to deliver two Class-8 battery-electric refuse trucks to Recology
http://www.greencarcongress.com/2018/07/20180718-byd.html

BYD (Build Your Dreams) will deliver two 8R Class-8 battery-electric refuse trucks . . . to Recology in Seattle, WA for use in residential solid waste pick up. These will be the first electric refuse trucks to operate in the entire Pacific Northwest region.

BYD’s 10-ton payload refuse truck features a 188 kWh battery pack (as configured for California HVIP) and provides 76 miles of range with minimal battery degradation. Fleet managers can expect more than $13,000 of operational cost savings annually based on service routes of 60 miles per day/five days a week. . . .

The electric refuse trucks are scheduled to be delivered in the first half of 2019.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

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