edatoakrun
Posts: 5076
Joined: Thu Nov 11, 2010 9:33 am
Delivery Date: 15 May 2011
Leaf Number: 2184
Location: Shasta County, North California

Re: "The challenge is to make an electric car do something that gasoline proportions and design can never do."

Mon Dec 12, 2016 10:52 am

Another (possible) contender in the high-price (probably very) BEV design contest.

Yet another self-described risky design, that IMO, may to take it too safe.

Slide show at the link:
2017 Fisker Emotion electric car - new picture reveals rear

A new shot of the Emotion has been revealed by founder Henrik Fisker. The model is claimed to feature ‘game-changing’ battery technology


...Fisker claimed that clever packaging enabled leg room and cabin space to be maximised in the Emotion. "The entire cabin has been moved forward very much, and we lowered the bonnet of the vehicle to get better aerodynamics," said Fisker. "Because of the better packaging of an EV model, we have been able to create a more dynamic and sporty design but the legroom is on par with large luxury saloons."

Fisker said that he decided to "take a risk to change the proportions" because he wants the new model's design to be original. "It’s a risk because people aren’t used to it," he explained...

http://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/new-c ... veals-rear
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edatoakrun
Posts: 5076
Joined: Thu Nov 11, 2010 9:33 am
Delivery Date: 15 May 2011
Leaf Number: 2184
Location: Shasta County, North California

Re: "The challenge is to make an electric car do something that gasoline proportions and design can never do."

Sun Jan 08, 2017 4:40 pm

Maybe not crazy, and certainly possible, but highly unlikely, IMO.

I would not be surprised if most BEVs eventually settled on 2+2, or 2+2+2 seating configurations, in cars 12 to 18 inches narrower than the LEAF. This reduction in frontal area would greatly improve high speed efficiency and range, for BEVs.

I've never seen much benefit of the rear center seat in the typical 2+3 configuration anyway.

But I think 1+1 seating is even less likely than the 1+2 seating Nissan previewed in the Bladeglider.

Crazy Jaguar 1+1 hints at brand’s EV future

Exclusive images of slimline premium Jaguar 1+1 electric car for crowded cities, which could arrive in the 2020s

Jaguar Land Rover’s group engineering director, Dr Wolfgang Ziebart, has revealed to Auto Express that the company could create a Jaguar 1+1 EV that’s around half the width of most premium cars.

The I-Pace Concept, Jag’s first electric car, stole the limelight at last November’s LA Motor Show, and buyers are already placing orders for the first production examples, due for delivery in 2018.

It’s understood that this warm acceptance of, and apparent appetite for, Jaguars with 100 per cent electric power has further motivated JLR to establish a very different and versatile range of pure EVs – including the 1+1 – by the 2020s. “Such a thing is possible,” Ziebart told us following the I-Pace’s global debut in LA...

http://www.autoexpress.co.uk/jaguar/982 ... -ev-future
no condition is permanent

edatoakrun
Posts: 5076
Joined: Thu Nov 11, 2010 9:33 am
Delivery Date: 15 May 2011
Leaf Number: 2184
Location: Shasta County, North California

Re: "The challenge is to make an electric car do something that gasoline proportions and design can never do."

Sun Feb 25, 2018 12:50 pm

edatoakrun wrote:...I'm most impressed by the Jaguar as I previously posted on the I-Pace thread:
...I give Jaguar credit for taking huge risks with the I-Pace design...

IMO, the I-pace design works, and I hope its acceptance will mean we will soon not have to see BEVs continue to display their huge empty frunks , in mimicry of the engine bays of ICEVs...

viewtopic.php?f=10&t=22545&start=10

The I-Pace design is building quite an impression:

Why rival designers are talking up the Jaguar I-Pace

You get that certain feeling about a new vehicle sometimes, just by the way people talk about it — a sense that it could occupy an important place in auto history.

Of course, that doesn't mean it'll break sales records. Think of the Chrysler Airstream, the Citroen DS21, the second-generation Nissan Pathfinder, the Honda Prelude and General Motors' EV1. But they were all ahead of their time. And maybe the Jaguar I-Pace is, too.

It's intriguing when, without prompting, designers talk up a rival vehicle. And I can't help but notice that it's happening with this electric crossover that launches next month in Europe and comes to the U.S. in the fall. The I-Pace debuted as a concept 15 months ago at the Los Angeles auto show, and it continues to grow on people whose opinions we respect...

Wherever designers gather these days, the subject of electrification comes up, and they keep citing the I-Pace as an example of where electrification will take crossover styling.

'Make it different'

Last fall, Geely design boss Peter Horbury, the ex-Volvo and Ford North American styling director, told me that electrification really ought to have an impact on the way vehicles look.

"I'm of the opinion that because you can make it different, because the electric powertrain gives other opportunities, [you should]. And I think Jaguar showed it beautifully with the I-Pace — where the front end is minimal, the cabin is big. It looks like a midengine sports car. There is no need for a long V-12 or six-cylinder engine. So you don't need the room for that. You can use the room for other purposes."...

http://europe.autonews.com/article/2018 ... /302199972
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specialgreen
Posts: 82
Joined: Sun Mar 26, 2017 1:21 pm
Delivery Date: 26 Mar 2017
Location: Minnesota

Re: "The challenge is to make an electric car do something that gasoline proportions and design can never do."

Wed May 09, 2018 7:32 pm

I heard that most of today's cars have a lower coefficient of drag when placed into a wind tunnel backwards. Having a long tail (teardrop shape) is a big advantage, and the sloping engine hood makes a good tail. So... driving a minivan backwards could actually be an improvement! In that case... why not flip the direction of the vehicle, and have the "tall hatchback" in front, and the sloping engine hood in back?

One reason is that the driver can't see much, if they are seated five feat behind the windshield. But if the car is driverless, or the driver's view were primarily via cameras, then yes, you could have a tall cargo area "in front."

Another question: if a rear-facing seat with a 30 to 45 degree reclining angle is the safest position for small children, then what is the safest position for adults? Should we also be facing backwards, reclining in "crash couches"?

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