GRA
Posts: 9206
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Hyundai Kona Electric

Sat Jun 23, 2018 2:58 pm

Via IEVS:
Hyundai Reports Nearly 7,000 Kona Electric Orders In Norway
https://insideevs.com/hyundai-reports-nearly-7000-kona-electric-orders-in-norway/

Over 13,000 reservation makers left pining
The Hyundai Kona Electric is an unqualified success in Norway. Sure, there have yet to be deliveries of the battery-powered crossover to the EV-thirsty nation — they should start July 1 — but reservations have been made: 20,000 of them before the list was closed. Now, we learn that 6,969 of these have been moved to firm orders and onto the configuration stage. . . .

If you weren’t among the original 20,000, your opportunity to get in line starts July 2, though Hyundai hints that your car may not be available until sometime in mid-2020. This reveals a potential flaw in the Korean carmaker’s plan for electric vehicle domination. By not being able to scale supply quickly enough to fill demand, they are leaving the door open to companies with product in a similar price range — in Norway, the Kona Electric starts at 325,900 NOK ($39,813) for the large 64 kWh battery option, the only pack available in the Kingdom. . . .
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

ElectricEddy
Posts: 477
Joined: Tue Feb 25, 2014 1:42 pm
Delivery Date: 31 Oct 2016
Leaf Number: 313506
Location: Nanaimo, B.C.

Re: Hyundai Kona Electric

Sat Jun 23, 2018 3:15 pm

GRA wrote:
jjeff wrote:
GRA wrote:You've got a 60A circuit?

50a, I guess I wouldn't use the full 48a but a full 42a for sure 8-) Well truthfully I'd also use 48a but only for short very quick charges, less than an hour or so. The 20% derating of our circuits is only for continuous use, short-term use is OK to get near the maximum :)

A small correction - for continuous duty a 50A circuit is limited to 40A, not 42A (50 x .8 = 40). Personally, even though continuous duty's 3+ hours, unless you've got a medical grade outlet and you know the conductor's in good shape with good connections, I wouldn't push anything over 40A for an hour, but then I generally prefer a conservative approach.

Section 8, rule 8-104, sub-rule (3) CEC 23 edition:
"The calculated load in a consumer's service,feeder, or branch circuit shall be considered a continuous load unless it can be shown that in normal operation it will not persist for
(a) a total of more than 1h in any two-hour period if the load does not exceed 225A ;or
(b) a total of more than 3h in any six-hour period if the load exceeds 225A

I would think that American code is very similar in wording seeing as the breakers are manufactured in the States
So unless we start charging at 226A and every 3 hours I would consider continuous ;)
Pearl White Sl
mfd date 09/16

GRA
Posts: 9206
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Hyundai Kona Electric

Sat Jun 23, 2018 3:25 pm

ElectricEddy wrote:
GRA wrote:
jjeff wrote:50a, I guess I wouldn't use the full 48a but a full 42a for sure 8-) Well truthfully I'd also use 48a but only for short very quick charges, less than an hour or so. The 20% derating of our circuits is only for continuous use, short-term use is OK to get near the maximum :)

A small correction - for continuous duty a 50A circuit is limited to 40A, not 42A (50 x .8 = 40). Personally, even though continuous duty's 3+ hours, unless you've got a medical grade outlet and you know the conductor's in good shape with good connections, I wouldn't push anything over 40A for an hour, but then I generally prefer a conservative approach.

Section 8, rule 8-104, sub-rule (3) CEC 23 edition:
"The calculated load in a consumer's service,feeder, or branch circuit shall be considered a continuous load unless it can be shown that in normal operation it will not persist for
(a) a total of more than 1h in any two-hour period if the load does not exceed 225A ;or
(b) a total of more than 3h in any six-hour period if the load exceeds 225A

I would think that American code is very similar in wording seeing as the breakers are manufactured in the States
So unless we start charging at 226A and every 3 hours I would consider continuous ;)

It's entirely possible that my knowledge of the NEC is out of date, but when I checked a few online sources before writing my previous post, they all said it was still 3 hours for continuous duty, with no shorter period specified.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

ElectricEddy
Posts: 477
Joined: Tue Feb 25, 2014 1:42 pm
Delivery Date: 31 Oct 2016
Leaf Number: 313506
Location: Nanaimo, B.C.

Re: Hyundai Kona Electric

Sat Jun 23, 2018 3:34 pm

GRA wrote:
ElectricEddy wrote:
GRA wrote:
A small correction - for continuous duty a 50A circuit is limited to 40A, not 42A (50 x .8 = 40). Personally, even though continuous duty's 3+ hours, unless you've got a medical grade outlet and you know the conductor's in good shape with good connections, I wouldn't push anything over 40A for an hour, but then I generally prefer a conservative approach.

Section 8, rule 8-104, sub-rule (3) CEC 23 edition:
"The calculated load in a consumer's service,feeder, or branch circuit shall be considered a continuous load unless it can be shown that in normal operation it will not persist for
(a) a total of more than 1h in any two-hour period if the load does not exceed 225A ;or
(b) a total of more than 3h in any six-hour period if the load exceeds 225A

I would think that American code is very similar in wording seeing as the breakers are manufactured in the States
So unless we start charging at 226A and every 3 hours I would consider continuous ;)

It's entirely possible that my knowledge of the NEC is out of date, but when I checked a few online sources before writing my previous post, they all said it was still 3 hours for continuous duty, with no shorter period specified.

Perhaps an American electrician can tune in and quote the rule as per NEC
Pearl White Sl
mfd date 09/16

GRA
Posts: 9206
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Hyundai Kona Electric

Sun Jun 24, 2018 3:57 pm

ElectricEddy wrote:
GRA wrote:It's entirely possible that my knowledge of the NEC is out of date, but when I checked a few online sources before writing my previous post, they all said it was still 3 hours for continuous duty, with no shorter period specified.

Perhaps an American electrician can tune in and quote the rule as per NEC

Here's one such cite, on flash cards per the 2014 NEC:
A load where the maximum current is expected to continue for 3 hours or more.
https://www.flashcardmachine.com/2014-necdefinitions.html

See 'Continuous load'. The current edition of the NEC is 2017, so maybe it's changed. All the online sources I found referred to the 2014 or earlier editions.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

edatoakrun
Posts: 5222
Joined: Thu Nov 11, 2010 9:33 am
Delivery Date: 15 May 2011
Leaf Number: 2184
Location: Shasta County, North California

Re: Hyundai Kona Electric

Mon Jun 25, 2018 11:18 am

Good to see that Hyundai is pricing both pack sizes reasonably in Europe, unlike TSLA's $9k charge for the larger pack on the model 3.

But even assuming the price surcharge on the larger pack is only $5k to $6k for the Kona (or Niro) in the USA, I'd probably want the smaller pack (if offered) based on what I'd be an expected increased TCO of ~$100 a month, in return for the minimal benefits of the longer-range pack, which I'd expect would reduce my total travel time by only a few hours per year.

Hyundai Kona Electric - Prices start at 34.600 euros

The Hyundai Kona Electric will be available in two battery (and power options) and three trim levels. The first is the 39.2 kilowatt-hours battery together with the 100 kW drive, which accelerates the small SUV to 100 km / h in 9.7 seconds. The range of the smaller of the two battery options is 312 km in the WLTP cycle.

With the equipment Trend Kona costs 34,600 euros. This can still be deducted from the environmental bonus, which reduces the purchase price by 4,300 euros. In the middle Style line the price is 38.100 Euro, the premium equipment is not available with the smaller battery.

If you want to order the 64 kWh battery, which is combined with a 150 kW drive, you pay at least 39,000 euros. This offers a range of 482 km to WLTP and the sprint to 100 shortens to 7.6 seconds. In the higher equipment costs the Kona electric with the big battery 42.500 Euro (Style) or 45.600 Euro (Premium)...

https://www.goingelectric.de/2018/06/19 ... -600-euro/
no condition is permanent

GRA
Posts: 9206
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Hyundai Kona Electric

Mon Jun 25, 2018 5:03 pm

39k Euros equals $45,632.34 for the big battery. Hopefully that includes a lot of local taxes that we won't see here, and they can keep base MSRP well under $40k. I'd think they have to in any case to compete with the Bolt, especially as GM will have to lower the Bolt's MSRP once the credit expires. The Niro can be priced a bit more owing to its larger size.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

edatoakrun
Posts: 5222
Joined: Thu Nov 11, 2010 9:33 am
Delivery Date: 15 May 2011
Leaf Number: 2184
Location: Shasta County, North California

Re: Hyundai Kona Electric

Thu Jun 28, 2018 12:19 pm

Great comp chart at the link:

https://pushevs.com/2018/06/27/chevrole ... -electric/

I hope at least one of the Niro/Kona twins will make it to the USA in the lite trim.

Chevrolet Bolt EV vs. Hyundai KONA Electric

With very similar prices, dimensions, features, range and sizes, it’s hard not to compare the Chevrolet Bolt EV with the Hyundai KONA Electric.

Moreover, both electric cars have plenty of internal components made by LG Chem.

Let’s see some differences between them.


Car

Chevrolet Bolt EV – Opel Ampera-e

Hyundai KONA Electric (Premium)

Hyundai KONA Electric (Lite)


...Curb weight (kg)

1.620

1.685

1.540


...Combined range

383 km (238 miles)

406 km (252 miles)

254 km (158 miles)


More info:

https://www.hyundai.com/kr/ko/vehicles/ ... ifications

http://www.chevrolet.co.kr/ev/boltev-specification.gm
no condition is permanent

edatoakrun
Posts: 5222
Joined: Thu Nov 11, 2010 9:33 am
Delivery Date: 15 May 2011
Leaf Number: 2184
Location: Shasta County, North California

Re: Hyundai Kona Electric

Fri Jun 29, 2018 10:30 am

Aggressive UK price for the Lite (the base ~39 kWh pack) model, with more range and ~10% lower price than the base LEAF:

Hyundai Kona Electric gets sub-£25,000 price

Hyundai’s second EV is a Nissan Juke rival, with only 8lb ft less torque than the 997 Porsche 911 GT3 and up to 292 miles of range from a single charge



Hyundai’s second EV, the Kona Electric, gets a 292-mile WLTP range from a single charge in its highest, 64kWh specification. Prices start at £24,995 for the lesser 39kWh version, including the Government's £4500 plug-in car grant.

The small SUV, the first EV in the segment, has two battery options, with the lesser option providing 186 miles of range from a 39.2kWh battery pack. Both variants have 104mph top speeds and 291 lb ft of torque – the same as the Alfa Romeo Giulia Veloce. It'll be revealed in the metal at this year's Geneva motor show.

The 64kWh car costs £29,495 - a £4500 premium over the 39kWh car, and £2205 more than the entry-level Nissan Leaf - its closest rival. Orders open in August, with first deliveries likely commencing a few weeks after this...

https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/moto ... 5000-price
no condition is permanent

GRA
Posts: 9206
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Hyundai Kona Electric

Sat Jun 30, 2018 3:00 pm

29,495 GBP = $38,959.92 for the 64kWh pack, so it does look like it will come in here under $40k.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

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