GRA
Posts: 9505
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Official Hyundai Nexo FCEV SUV

Thu Aug 17, 2017 5:50 pm

I'll change the topic title once the vehicle's officially named. [Edit: Done, 1/8/18] Via GCC:
Hyundai previews near-production-ready next-gen fuel cell SUV; new eco-vehicle development roadmap
http://www.greencarcongress.com/2017/08 ... undai.html

At a special preview event held in Seoul, Hyundai Motor provided an early glimpse of its next-generation hydrogen fuel cell vehicle, which is due to launch early next year. . . .

The new fuel cell model was developed on four key pillars that focus on fuel cell system efficiency; performance (maximum output); durability; and tank storage density.

    Fuel cell system efficiency: By enhancing fuel cell performance, reducing hydrogen consumption, and optimizing key components, the vehicle’s efficiency is greatly improved compared to the its predecessor, the ix35 Fuel Cell (Tucson Fuel Cell in some markets). The new SUV boasts an efficiency level of 60%, or a 9% increase from the ix35’s 55.3%. With enhanced system efficiency, the new model targets a driving range of more than 580 km (360 miles) on a single charge (based on Korean testing standards).

    Performance (maximum output): The new model’s maximum output is enhanced by 20% compared to its predecessor, with 163 PS (120 kW) of power. The fuel cell SUV also improves the car’s cold start capability, overcoming the challenges of starting fuel cell vehicles in temperatures below freezing point. The vehicle’s architecture is optimized to allow it to be started at -30 degrees Celsius (22 degrees Fahrenheit), by incorporating key components in the fuel stack developed by Hyundai Motor. In addition to boosting the new car’s capabilities, the enhanced components—such as MEA (membrane electrode assembly) and bipolar plates—also helped to reduce production costs.

    Durability: By employing highly durable catalyst technology, the new hydrogen-powered SUV ensures even greater longevity than its predecessor.

    Hydrogen storage: The next-generation hydrogen vehicle makes significant improvements in tank storage density. The tank package now features three equally-sized tanks, as opposed to two of different sizes. World-class tank gravimetric capacity was achieved through innovations to the plastic liner configuration and efficient layering pattern, which resulted in a reduction of thickness..

The mass-produced new vehicle will also feature advanced driver assistance technologies, alongside its extensive hydrogen-powered range. The details of the new ADAS features will be disclosed in January at the 2018 CES, along with the official model name. . . .


IDK what the Korean test cycle looks like, but presumably the new car will be longer ranged than the Tucson's 265 EPA, and I'm figuring on something at or over 300 miles EPA.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 9505
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Official Hyundai Nexo FCEV SUV

Mon Jan 08, 2018 7:24 pm

Via GCR:
Production Hyundai Nexo hydrogen fuel-cell SUV appears at CES
https://www.greencarreports.com/news/1114636_production-hyundai-nexo-hydrogen-fuel-cell-suv-appears-at-ces

The 2019 Hyundai Nexo is the first dedicated hydrogen vehicle that's an SUV; the various Honda and Toyota models that preceded it have all been four-door sedans.

The Nexo will go on sale in limited markets later this year, and it sits on underpinnings designed from the ground up around its hydrogen fuel-cell powertrain.

For a compact to mid-size SUV, the Nexo has relatively sedate specifications: its motor is rated at 120 kilowatts (160 horsepower) and 291 pound-feet of torque.

Hyundai quotes a 0-to-60-mph acceleration time of 9.5 seconds. The more important figure—the range provided by 5 or 6 kilograms of hydrogen in its reinforced 10,000-psi pressure tanks—is estimated at 370 miles. . . .
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

LeftieBiker
Posts: 9820
Joined: Wed May 22, 2013 3:17 am
Delivery Date: 30 Apr 2018
Location: Upstate New York, US

Re: Official Hyundai Nexo FCEV SUV

Mon Jan 08, 2018 10:16 pm

The nose looks like they held a nose design contest, and then decided to incorporate every single one of the entries.
Scarlet Ember 2018 Leaf SL W/ Pro Pilot
2009 Vectrix VX-1 W/18 Leaf modules, & 3 EZIP E-bicycles.
PLEASE don't PM me with Leaf questions. Just post in the topic that seems most appropriate.

GRA
Posts: 9505
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Official Hyundai Nexo FCEV SUV

Tue Jan 09, 2018 5:57 pm

LeftieBiker wrote:The nose looks like they held a nose design contest, and then decided to incorporate every single one of the entries.

The Japanese and the Koreans do seem to be in a contest to see who can put the ugliest nose on a production car. Meanwhile, American companies are trying to see who can put the most macho nose on a truck - my grill's bigger than your grill! :lol:

Back on topic, via GCC:
Hyundai introduces next-generation fuel cell vehicle NEXO; availability beginning later this year
http://www.greencarcongress.com/2018/01/20180109-nexo.html

The article includes several snapshots of comparison charts, including dimensions (the Nexo is longer than the Tucson, at 183.9" vs. 173.6"; slightly wider at 73.2" vs. 71.7", and slightly lower at 64.2" vs. 65.2"). 0-60 time drops from 12.5 sec. to either 9.9 or 9.5, depending on which chart you read.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 9505
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Official Hyundai Nexo FCEV SUV

Thu Feb 22, 2018 5:35 pm

Via GCR:
Hyundai Nexo fuel-cell SUV verdicts: classy, zippier, still a "niche vehicle"
https://www.greencarreports.com/news/1115410_hyundai-nexo-fuel-cell-suv-verdicts-classy-zippier-still-a-niche-vehicle

The Hyundai Nexo hydrogen fuel-cell SUV that debuted last month at the Consumer Electronics Show won't be seen on California roads for many months yet. It is expected to go on sale in the U.S. in the fourth quarter of this year, but now we have a few reports from outlets that have driven the one SUV whose only tailpipe emission is water. The general consensus is that the Nexo is a more integrated, more refined, and likely far more practical vehicle in daily use than was its predecessor. . . .

While the hydrogen-powered Tucson was good enough for a vehicle not originally designed for that powertrain, we found its performance slow, especially at highway speeds. The Nexo, on the other hand, is a dedicated hydrogen fuel-cell vehicle, meaning the model is not available with any other powertrain. . . .

While the quality of the interior materials surpasses that of other Hyundais, Auto Express said, it's still not comparable to what you'd find in standard premium SUVs from the predictable list of German, British, and Japanese players. Hyundai said it expects the car's fuel-cell stack to last at least 10 years, or twice the predicted lifespan of the one used in the Tucson Fuel Cell.

That durability is combined with comparable passenger volume and cargo space to other SUVs of its size, the reviewers said, despite the large high-pressure hydrogen tanks nestled in the undercarriage. . . .

It called the hydrogen SUV "zippier to drive" than the Tucson Fuel Cell, with better acceleration and more torque from a motor with a higher output of 120 kilowatts (161 horsepower) vs the Tucson's 100 kw (134 hp). The Nexo is projected to earn an EPA range rating of more than 350 miles, Hyundai told attendees at the Seoul drive event. . . .

In the end, Auto Express concluded, "As good as the Nexo is, it’s still a niche vehicle that’s difficult to recommend" due to the limited fueling infrastructure.

That summation falls firmly in the "Well, Duh!" category. Direct links to the Auto Express and and Automotive news articles which the GCR article is based on, are here:

http://www.autoexpress.co.uk/hyundai/nexo/102690/new-hyundai-nexo-fuel-cell-suv-2018-review

http://www.autonews.com/article/20180219/OEM04/180219745/hyundai-nexo-is-a-rolling-showcase-of-self-driving-eco-car-technology

The Auto Express article includes lots of photos. I think it's decent looking from the side, quite nice from the rear, and the front, well, it's better than a Mirai, Clarity or Prius! IMO it's the only one whose looks don't qualify it as a weirdmobile. From the Automotive news article:
The Nexo’s overall fuel cell stack is also more efficient. Its power density improves by half, its overall size drops 18 percent to save space under the hood, and it is 14 percent lighter.

The Nexo is also zippier to drive, accelerating faster than the Tucson with more torque. . . .

Meanwhile, Hyundai is loading the Nexo with new self-driving and advanced safety systems.

It gets an around-view camera blind-spot monitor that sees angles on both sides of the car that can’t be reached by traditional mirrors. It beams images the blind spots to a display in the center console of the car while changing lanes -- a system Hyundai claims is world-first technology.

The lane following assist function -- a first for Hyundai -- enables the car to steer itself down the road and keep centered in the lane. It works at speeds from 0 to 90 mph.

Finally, Hyundai is deploying a remote parking assist function in the Nexo. . . .

From the Auto Express article:
. . . Impressively, given the size of the hydrogen tanks underneath the floor the NEXO, there’s little compromise to be found in terms of space. Head and legroom in the rear is perfectly good, even for six footers, and while the 471-litre boot isn’t that deep, it’s plenty big enough for most families’ needs. There’s a decent amount of cabin storage, too. . . .

0-62mph is taken care of in a decent 9.7 seconds, and it feels sprightly enough off the line for what’s likely a two-tonne SUV. However, in the same way as a typical EV performance tails off noticeably at motorway speeds. Still, there’s enough poke to satisfy the average motorist.

Our drive of the NEXO consisted mainly of motorway driving, but even on twisting slip roads the weight of the three hydrogen tanks and powertrain was noticeable, with pronounced body lean. But ease off and you’re rewarded with a supple ride thanks to soft, long-travel suspension, and strong refinement marred only by a rustle of wind noise. We’ll have to wait for final production versions to arrive in the UK for a definitive verdict, however. . . .

No prices announced. FWIW, the Forester model I currently drive managed 9.6 sec. 0-60 when tested by C&D, and I've always found that adequate for my needs so this would probably work for me, as long as the passing capability is reasonable at two-lane mountain road speeds, i.e. start speed 20-55 mph, end speed 20 mph higher. The Auto Express article also mentions that the overall efficiency of the stack is 60%, which while not in BEV territory is still well above any ICE - I think the highest efficiency I've seen claimed for a production ICE was 40% recently, but I forget whether it was Toyota or somebody else.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 9505
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Official Hyundai Nexo FCEV SUV

Wed Mar 21, 2018 6:27 pm

Via ABG:
2019 Hyundai Nexo Quick Spin Review | A better hydrogen fuel cell crossover
In South Korea, we test Hyundai's latest hydrogen fuel cell vehicle.
https://www.autoblog.com/2018/03/20/2019-hyundai-nexo-review/

. . . Our first stint inside the vehicle took place in the back seat, where we had plenty of legroom and clean surroundings. The interior was white and grey with matte silver metallic trim. The plastics in the Nexo aren't particularly soft, but somehow Hyundai makes them look premium with fine grains and patterns — one of the tricks Hyundai uses to make its affordable cars feel like higher-end automobiles. We were comfortable back there, especially with rear seat heaters to ward of the winter chill in the Korean mountains as we drove past the Winter Olympics in PyeongChang.

When it came our turn to get behind the wheel, we felt right at home in the comfortable driver's seat. The steering wheel was attractive in its two-tone leather, and smooth to the touch. The digital instrument panel and touchscreen extending to the right of it offered high definition images, crisp colors and ultra-quick response. The overwhelming number of buttons on the center console threw us off, though. It reminded us of a control panel for some sort of spaceship.

Driving across a foreign country, we were put at ease by the robust navigation system. Not only did it show and tell us where to go, it let us know what the speed limit was, and even identified the locations of speed cameras, something the Santa Fe was kind enough to do for us as well. Distances were in the metric system, which took some getting used to, but a shrinking bar on the nav screen helped us count down the actual distance to our next turn. We learned to focus on that rather than the voice telling us to "Turn now," which was always a little too early.

The Nexo wasn't quick, but it was smooth, and the quiet, linear acceleration was satisfying. Most of our driving took place on the highway, so there wasn't of lot of acceleration or braking or cornering . . . For this sort of driving, the quiet, calm Nexo was a pleasant companion.

Nexo is equipped with a number of driver assist features which we found helpful. Adaptive cruise control helped us keep to the speed limit (those cameras are everywhere) and maintain following distance, while the lane minder kept the car stable and centered. When we did go to switch lanes, touching the signal pulled up a camera feed on from the side of the vehicle, showing our blind spot in the center of the instrument, cluster. This is similar to Honda's system, but this covers both sides, the display is better placed, and the picture is more clear and full. In the Nexo, we found it far more helpful than distracting, and we'd like to see it come to more vehicles. . . .
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 9505
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Official Hyundai Nexo FCEV SUV

Sat Mar 31, 2018 3:18 pm

Via IEVS:
Here Is How Hyundai Improved Hydrogen Fuel Cell Cars – Nexo
https://insideevs.com/here-is-how-hyundai-improved-hydrogen-fuel-cell-cars-nexo/

Hyundai highly improved its FCEV compared to the old Tucson FCEV as the new dedicated model can go up to 370 miles (595 km) compared to 265 miles (426 km).

Acceleration from 0-60 mph improved from 12.5 to 9.5 seconds. Nexo’s electric motor is rated at 120 kW and 395 Nm.

The fuel cell is able to provide around 95 kW of power, together with 40 kW from the battery, total output of 135 kW is available . . . .

That "370" miles is estimated, not official EPA. Photos and specs in the article, along with Hyundai's PR fluff. Only thing I don't like about it is that it's considerably larger than the Tucson, which was similar in size to my 2003 Forester (but current Foresters have similar dimensions to the Nexo, as each succeeding Gen. of a vehicle almost inevitably grows). Still no prices, but I think they need to get it down to no more than $50k to allow it to go head to head with the Model 3/Y LR, and preferably $45k or less. I suspect the latter's doubtful. If they can get it to $50k, the infrastructure's there and the company is subsidizing the fuel, I suspect it will outsell the Mirai and Clarity combined here. CUVs are the name of the game these days, and the Nexo improves virtually all of the issues that handicapped the Tucson relative to the other two FCEVs.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 9505
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Official Hyundai Nexo FCEV SUV

Tue Sep 11, 2018 6:10 pm

Via IEVS:
Fully Charged Tries Out Hyundai NEXO Hydrogen Fuel Cell Car
https://insideevs.com/fully-charged-thyundai-nexo-fuel-cell-car/

. . . The NEXO can go up to 600 km (373 miles) on a single tank of hydrogen and, as it turns out in the video, it clears the air from emissions too.

about 370 miles (595 km)
0-60 mph in 9.5 seconds
120 kW and 395 Nm electric motor
fuel cell is able to provide around 95 kW of power, together with 40 kW from the battery, total output of 135 kW is available. . . .

Video link. Robert Llewellyn likes it.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 9505
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Official Hyundai Nexo FCEV SUV

Tue Oct 16, 2018 6:05 pm

Via GCR:
2019 Hyundai Nexo: first drive of 380-mile fuel-cell crossover utility
https://www.greencarreports.com/news/1119347_2019-hyundai-nexo-first-drive-of-380-mile-fuel-cell-crossover-utility

. . . The Nexo gives Hyundai a pair of distinctions: It’s the only hydrogen-powered utility on the market, and its EPA-rated range comes in at 380 miles combined from the 6.3 kg of compressed hydrogen it carries in three tanks. That’s higher than the 366 miles of the Honda Clarity Fuel Cell, the previous range champ among hydrogen vehicles, as well as the 312 miles of the Toyota Mirai. . . .

The 2019 Hyundai Nexo has the upright lines and cargo hatch of a utility, though it lacks the ground clearance and all-wheel-drive option many buyers will expect. In size, it’s a compact crossover roughly the size of the old Tuscon, but its smooth lines and broad-shouldered presence make it look larger and more substantial than the gasoline counterpart. . . .

the Nexo’s fuel-cell stack operates at up to 60 percent efficiency, meaning that proportion of the energy contained in its hydrogen fuel is converted to electricity. The Tucson’s maximum was 55 percent. Cold starts are possible from as low as -22 degrees C (- 8 deg F) [GRA: This is a conversion error. Per the Nexo website, it should be -30 deg. C (-22 deg. F)].

Output of the fuel-cell stack fell slightly, to 95 kw from the previous 100 kw. But for transient power demands, the lithium-ion battery pack delivers up to 40 kilowatts, fully two-thirds higher, enough to power an electric motor with 20 percent higher output, at 120 kw (161 horsepower).

That’s not particularly high for a heavy-ish crossover. But the Nexo did fine around town, with relatively aggressive power tip-in up to 30 mph, and it acquitted itself adequately in fast LA freeway traffic. That’s an area in which the Tucson Fuel Cell was far too slow, almost dangerously so.

Hyundai suggested a 0-to-60-mph acceleration of 9.2 seconds; that meant the Nexo felt adequate, though not particularly lively above 40 mph.
. . .

Could the Nexo be provided with the same acceleration as the 258-mile Kona Electric? We posted the question to Dr. Bo Ki Hong, a fuel-cell research fellow at Hyundai’s R&D group. He smiled, perhaps wistfully, and suggested that such performance might be challenging to achieve.

Remarkably, the Nexo has the best combination of ride and handling among the three current fuel-cell contenders. It’s neither tall nor tippy as some crossovers can be, and while its tires don’t have a ton of grip, the steering is direct and the car remained well-behaved through the twists and turns of Topanga Canyon Road.

By comparison, the Mirai feels remote and numb from the wheel, while the Clarity Fuel Cell’s soft, smooth ride comes at the expense of handling and roadholding. Indeed, the Nexo was fully the equal of the current gasoline Tucson—if not perhaps quite as good as the best-handling compact crossovers, which we’d peg as the Mazda CX-5 and perhaps the Volkswagen Tiguan.

The Nexo is remarkably quiet on the road, with less wind and tire noise evident in the cabin than we had expected. Hyundai focused intently on reducing noise and vibration, it said, fitting triple-layer noise-reducing glass not only for the windscreen but also the front side windows. .
. .

While the Nexo’s load deck is an inch or two higher than other compact crossovers, it’s not particularly noticeable. Cargo volume is 29.6 cubic feet (just slightly less than the 31 cubic feet of the current gasoline Tucson). That’s double the Mirai’s trunk volume, and almost triple that of the Clarity Fuel Cell.

he Nexo’s two trim levels differ considerably in features, options, and even range. The base Nexo Blue is rated at 380 miles, while the higher-spec Nexo Limited is more than 2 tons, cutting its rating to 354 miles.

Its efficiency rating falls as well, from the Blue’s 61 MPGe to 57 MPGe in the Limited. (Miles Per Gallon Equivalent, or MPGe, is a measure of how far a vehicle can travel on the amount of energy contained in 1 gallon of gasoline.) On a 40-mile drive through urban traffic, some freeway, and the twisty canyon road, the trip computer calculated an efficiency of 57.3 MPGe.

Still, as Hyundai’s technology flagship, the Nexo Limited offers features not found on any other Hyundai.

The flashiest of these may be its Remote Self Parking Assist, in which the car can be directed to park itself not only with the driver behind the wheel but also remotely via the key fob, as long as the driver stands within 2 meters (about 6 feet) of the car.

Pressing a button in the console alerts the Nexo to start looking for parking places, both parallel and perpendicular. It will parallel-park itself, or back into perpendicular spaces—the general practice in Asian countries—though it won’t do nose-in perpendicular parking or self-park in angled spaces.

Hyundai has not yet released pricing for the Nexo, nor has it said when the fuel-cell SUV will arrive at California dealers.

That state now has 35 operating hydrogen fueling stations, and is expected to have 59 open by the start of 2020. That’s considerably fewer than the 100 planned for 2020 back in 2013, but it will allow 10,000 or more fuel-cell vehicles to be filled up as required.

As of September 30, just over 4,000 Toyota Mirais and roughly 1,100 Honda Clarity Fuel Cells had been delivered in California—the only state in which hydrogen fuel is commercially available. By comparison, battery-electric and plug-in hybrid vehicle sales over the last 10 years have now crossed the 1-million mark.

It seems safe to dub the 2019 Hyundai Nexo the best of the three hydrogen-powered vehicles now on sale in California. It wins on looks over the bizarre Toyota Mirai and the pudgy, awkward Honda Clarity, as well as for its top range and enjoyable driving feel. . . .

For buyers who want a crossover with no tailpipe emissions directly from the vehicle itself (except water), the Nexo will fit the bill if AWD isn’t a requirement. But it’s sold only in a single state, its range is limited by the sparse fueling infrastructure, and we expect total deliveries only in the low thousands over the Nexo’s lifetime. It’s not a crossover you can drive across the U.S.

We never had any doubt that the world’s largest carmakers could deliver appealing, modern, capable vehicles running on hydrogen. The 2019 Hyundai Nexo raises the stakes in that game, leaving Toyota and Honda with some work to do to catch up on range and design.

As always, the key to the long-term viability of hydrogen fuel-cell cars isn’t the vehicles themselves, but the infrastructure that has to be created from scratch to keep them fueled. For the U.S. overall, that remains a very open question.

The lack of AWD is new info, and disappointing.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 9505
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Official Hyundai Nexo FCEV SUV

Thu Oct 18, 2018 5:42 pm

Via IEVS, Tom Moloughney's take:
2019 Hyundai Nexo Fuel Cell First Drive
https://insideevs.com/2019-hyundai-nexo-fuel-cell-first-drive/

. . . The planned route took us from our hotel through bumper to bumper Los Angeles city traffic for a while, before a stint on the highway, and finally ending up on the winding roads of Topanga Canyon. The Nexo isn’t a quick vehicle, and actually seemed a little slower than Hyundai’s claimed 0-60 time of 9.2 seconds. The Nexo weighs between 3,990 and 4,116 pounds depending on trim, and the motor’s 161 horsepower and 291 pound-feet of torque are adequate while driving around town, but definitely underwhelming at higher speeds.

There really isn’t much oomph at highway speeds when you punch the accelerator, and I asked Dr. Bo Ki Hong, a fuel-cell specialist for Hyundai who was riding along with me in the Nexo, if they could improve the performance. He said that it would be “challenging” to get much more power delivery. It is worth to note that Hyundai did improve the performance of the Nexo over their previous hydrogen-powered offering, the Tucson Fuel Cell. The Tucson needed a full twelve seconds to reach 60 mph.

But it’s not all bad news for the Nexo. Besides the mediocre power, the Nexo is actually a real pleasure to drive. The seats were very comfortable, and I really loved the instrumentation as well as the center console. The driver’s display and the center display screens are connected into one unit, even though they work as two independent screens. I liked the layout, both for display and aesthetics.

It actually felt like I was driving a vehicle from high-end premium manufacturer. To reduce noise, Hyundai used triple-layer noise-reducing glass on the windshield and front windows, and the result is a serene cabin experience. The journalist I was partnered with felt the same way and said Hyundai should rename it the “Chill,” because it was so smooth, quiet and comfortable. The handling was compromised by the low-rolling resistance tires, but the vehicle exhibited very little body-roll and took the winding mountain roads of Topanga Canyon well. . . .

If I were in the market for a Hydrogen fuel cell vehicle, I believe this would be my choice – by a wide margin over the Toyota Mirai or Honda Clarity, both of which I’ve had the opportunity to ride in. The ride quality, comfort, luxury and utility of a CUV make the Nexo the clear fuel cell winner in my book. It’s worlds better than Hyundai’s previous fuel cell offering, the Tucson. The Nexo also has a longer range than the fuel cell offerings from Toyota and Honda, with 380 miles of range compared to 312 for the Mirai and 366 for the Clarity. But the 380 miles of range is only possible with the base trim called “Blue.” The “limited” trim adds weight and larger wheels which reduces the range to 354 miles. . . .

We even had the opportunity to visit an H2 station and refuel a Nexo. The cost of the Hydrogen at this station was $17.50/kg. That means refueling an empty Nexo would cost $110 which divides out to a fuel cost of 29 cents per mile. That’s about three times more than a comparable efficient gasoline crossover would cost to fuel and between five and ten times more than the Kona Electric would cost to recharge, depending on where you live.

To offset the high cost of Hydrogen, Hyundai is giving Nexo owners a credit card that gives them $5,000 of free Hydrogen. Both Toyota and Honda have similar hydrogen subsidy programs for their fuel cell customers. Hyundai hasn’t released pricing for the Nexo, but it is expected to be about $55,000, making it a tough sell when you consider the competition in that price range. . . .

Toyota and Honda both give customers $15k of fuel over three years, so I wonder if the CC that Tom refers to is for just the first year, and the amount gets replenished every year until you reach the end of the third year. Otherwise, it simply doesn't compete. We'll have to wait a bit until we get more official info to clarify this and other questions.


Also IEVS:
Why Hyundai Pursues Hydrogen Fuel Cell Cars
https://insideevs.com/why-hyundai-pursues-hydrogen/

. . . Before we get to their answer, I should mention that – if you put aside the broader, real concerns about EV versus hydrogen technology and infrastructure – the Nexo was the nicer of the two vehicles. The Nexo is a muscular, efficient small crossover with sharp lines, a striking floating canopy, and a high-tech but accessible cockpit. The Nexo was noticeably quieter and more refined than the Kona Electric.

So why power the Nexo or any vehicle with hydrogen? Dr. Bo Ki Hong, a Hyundai fuel-cell research fellow, in his technical presentation, argued that a hydrogen power plant is better suited for larger, longer-range vehicles while battery-powered EVs are a better match for smaller, shorter-range cars. The Nexo has 380 miles of driving range and can be refueled in about five minutes. Dr. Bo said there will be 59 hydrogen stations in operation in California by the end of 2019. . . .

“There’s no doubt that battery technology is advancing,” said O’Brien. “But we know today and from back-of-napkin calculations, that hydrogen has higher capabilities for the foreseeable future.” He said that hydrogen is scalable for any type of vehicle, including buses and trains. Keep in mind that Hyundai also manufacturers commercial vehicles.

Gil Castillo, senior group manager for alternative vehicle strategy for Hyundai, rode with us in the Hyundai Nexo. He echoed O’Brien’s point. “As batteries get better, they make sense for small and medium cars and eventually slightly bigger cars,” said Castillo. “But at some point, especially when you get into heavy-duty vehicles, batteries run into limitations.” He said that the cost, size, and energy curves for both batteries and fuel cells are always changing, so it makes sense to consider both technologies for the full range of vehicles in use. . . .

Castillo said that consumers buy a lot of full-size SUVs and pickups in the United States. “You can serve the majority of consumers with an [GRA: B]EV but not 100 percent of them,” said Castillo. He said that many people who live in multi-family dwellings don’t have access to charging. “We have to develop battery technology because it’s going to play a major role,” he said. “I think fuel cell will not play the major role, but it will be complementary. The goal is to fill the whole spectrum across the entire transportation ecosystem.”
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

Return to “Other Electric Cars & Plug-In Hybrids”