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Re: I Want my (fast) DC!

Wed Apr 20, 2011 9:07 am

Smidge204 wrote:
jimcmorr wrote:So it would seem that it would be possible to have a DC charge station on a single phase supply, though perhaps taking a little longer than 20 to 30 minutes to charge

There's no (technical) reason you couldn't rig an off-board DC charger that ran on single phase power, you just need the appropriate wiring and service size to feed it.

It's all about the coulombs, Jim!
=Smidge=

And the CHadeMo protocol (or how ever that's capitalized) :lol:
2011 Silver SL+QC [Mfg: 11/2010] 36mo/15k LEASE
06Jun2013 Status [28.5 months][34,173 miles][11 bars]
Lost CapacityBar 6/6/13 @34,173 miles while in LEAF Battery Monitor: 83.41%, 71.4F (avg); cool overnight;

jimcmorr
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Re: I Want my (fast) DC!

Wed Apr 20, 2011 9:52 am

LEAFer wrote:
Smidge204 wrote:
jimcmorr wrote:So it would seem that it would be possible to have a DC charge station on a single phase supply, though perhaps taking a little longer than 20 to 30 minutes to charge

There's no (technical) reason you couldn't rig an off-board DC charger that ran on single phase power, you just need the appropriate wiring and service size to feed it.

It's all about the coulombs, Jim!
=Smidge=

And the CHadeMo protocol (or how ever that's capitalized) :lol:



Thanks guys.

When I am able to order my LEAF I may take the challenge and figure out how we might do a QC station on a single phase service.

Many coulombs to you all!

Jim :geek:

Glacier Pearl SV reserved April 25, 2010
Won't be able to order until late this year if I stay in NH :cry:
Trying to get my house sold to move to GA, near our daughter and her family
Jim M
res: 25APR10 #612239F1 Glacier Pearl SV
Ordered: 03Mar12 Cayenne Red SL
VIN: 18747 - pickup: Mon 2Apr12
22Apr14: over 20K mi / lost 1 capacity bar Mar 2014
It isn't 100% electric if you have to put gas in it.

DarkStar
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Re: I Want my (fast) DC!

Wed Apr 20, 2011 10:28 am

LEAFer wrote:And the CHadeMo protocol (or how ever that's capitalized) :lol:

CHAdeMO, but it doesn't really matter... :D
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Reserved: 04/20/10 | Ordered: 10/01/10 | EV Project Blink Installed: 03/22/11 | Delivered: 03/25/11 | VIN: 568

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hill
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Re: I Want my (fast) DC!

Mon Jul 11, 2011 10:00 am

Jimmydreams wrote:I don't understand what more you want Nissan to do. They offer L3 charging on the Leaf.

What about all the people do don't have garages who want a Leaf? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . snip
Sorry for raising a zombie here, but Nissan works with AV ... and AV is working on Chademo builds ... too slow for many. But Nissan CAN do more ... just as Mitsubishi is doing more. If Nissan knew how dedicated the SAE is to making certain that Chademo never takes off, they'd realize its to the benefit of Nissan, that Nissan be VERY involved in Chademo success ... as quick as possible ... just as Mitsubishi seems to realize its importance. Ergo the recent Chademo install here in Orange County. Shame on Nissan that they're letting Mitsubishi's proactive stance pass them by.

edatoakrun
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Re: I Want my (fast) DC!

Thu May 16, 2013 6:52 am

Better late than never, the press release below indicates Nissan may finally understand what seemed obvious to me months before I even got my LEAF, as I wrote in the OP on this thread, that DC chargers drive LEAF sales.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – After the all-electric Nissan LEAF's best sales month ever in March and a 423.5 percent year-over-year sales increase in April, Nissan LEAF continues to make history by crossing the 25,000 sales threshold, reinforcing LEAF's position as the world's best-selling electric vehicle.

"From the beginning our goal with LEAF has been to bring affordable, zero-emission transportation to the mass market in a practical, fun-to-drive package," said Erik Gottfried, Nissan director of electric vehicle (EV) marketing and sales strategy. "With more than 25,000 LEAFs in the U.S. and 62,000 around the world, we're seeing the adoption curve for EVs accelerate, and there is tremendous interest not only on the West Coast but in a number of new strongholds like Atlanta, Raleigh, Denver, Dallas, Chicago, St. Louis and many more."

Nissan LEAF sales have risen steadily since the vehicle's launch and have grown tremendously compared to the previous year with sales jumping several-fold in LEAF's traditionally high-performing markets such as San Francisco—where LEAF was the top-selling vehicle for the Nissan brand in April—Los Angeles, Seattle, Portland and San Diego.

"Pioneering the EV trail with LEAF, we've had the opportunity to evaluate the purchase process of EV buyers. We have maintained an ongoing dialogue with our customers, and through that we've learned just how different the process is for buying a LEAF versus a traditional gas-powered car," said Gottfried. "We've found that customers interested in LEAF come to the showroom exceptionally well educated about the product. Then post-purchase, they stay engaged with us, connect with the LEAF owner community and share their experience broadly, which drives greater interest in LEAF."

"We've also learned how infrastructure plays a role in a consumer's decision to go all-electric," added Brendan Jones, Nissan's director of EV infrastructure strategy and deployment. "We already knew that areas with a higher concentration of EVs would require more charging stations, but trends show that the reverse is also true—a more robust charging infrastructure generates greater interest in EVs and stimulates more EV driving among EV owners."

Nissan continues to make progress with its commitment to enhance the charging infrastructure in the United States and since announcing plans earlier this year to triple the number of quick chargers from 200 to 600, Nissan and its charging partners already have installed about 50 additional units where interest in LEAF and EVs is highest...


http://nissannews.com/en-US/nissan/usa/ ... -milestone

edatoakrun wrote:Posted: Fri Jan 14, 2011 9:59 am

I do not understand Nissan USA's apparent reluctance to contribute to the development of the public fast charge infrastructure.

Billions of dollars have been invested by Nissan in designing and producing the LEAF. IMO the design and concept is far superior to any of the "plug-in" or ICE "conversions" that will enter the market in the next few years. But there is currently a glaring failure in the LEAF concept to any potential American buyer. Nissan is allowing it's EV competitors to beat it up over "range anxiety" and slower level 2 charge times...

Until roadside charging becomes a reality, EV/ICE half-breeds like the Volt will be named "car of the year", and actual EV's will be considered fringe products.
no condition is permanent

thankyouOB
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Re: I Want my (fast) DC!

Fri May 17, 2013 5:29 pm

new QC at Power Nissan in Hawthorne off the 405 in LA County.

available to LEAFs only.
open daily - dont know the closing time each day.
near front of building to left of service entrance.

is this the best place to post this? please include in any compendium.
may reserve/delivery 4/30/11
--
ECOtality/LADWP/ Blink 4/4/11
--
Gardena Nissan, msrp -1k
red SL with etec L3
SOLAR POWERED since 2008

edatoakrun
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Re: I Want my (fast) DC!

Wed Mar 19, 2014 9:17 am

The necessity of public DC on major highways for widespread BEV adoption is universal, as I experienced (yet again, unfortunately) in Chico California last Sunday afternoon, when the only (semi-public) DC in California North of Sacramento was dead.

For the view from GB:

...the focus needs to be squarely placed on the development of a universal charging network that’s as easy to use as our network of petrol stations. People need to know that they will be able to find a charging point quickly and easily when they need one, and that when they do it will be compatible with their car. This is simply not the case in the UK at the moment...

Currently, I believe the biggest need is for development of more mode four chargers (high power DC) along major trunk roads in the UK and in city centres. Mode four chargers can now take PEV batteries to 80 per cent in just 15 in minutes in some cases a greatly reduced time when compared to the slow domestic charges that would typically be done over a number of hours. Expanding the number of mode four chargers would mean that, on the odd occasion a PEV driver needs to make an exceptional journey, they would be able to recharge quickly and efficiently in their driving breaks...


http://www.theengineer.co.uk/opinion/vi ... 08.article
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verobel
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Re: I Want my (fast) DC!

Thu May 08, 2014 6:34 am

I drive my LEAF in Ontario Canada. So far I have used it 98% for commuting to/from work and it works quite well for that. I have ventured out on longer trips (Kingston 85+85 km return) and more recently (Kitchener/Waterloo 300+300 km return). Although I was pleased to be able to do the trip and found L2 chargers at BestWestern Hotels, Nissan Dealers and Some Go-Transit Stations (Whitby), I was very disappointed that the main service centers along our major highway 401 have NO chargers anywhere. In addition, the longer trip took 12 hours! Compare that to the ICE time of around 5.

Surely Nissan and the Province of Ontario could get together and put 2 or 3 L3 charges at all Enroute service centers across the 401. It would probably only take the average Leaf driver 20 minutes to top up his battery to 80% (adding roughly 100 km), giving sufficient energy to make it to the next Enroute station.

Nissan has started to move in the right direction with their one and only L3 charger at Nissan HQ near Pearson Airport. It is a beautiful machine that is amazingly fast. If they could supply say 50 L3 chargers at cost to En route stations in both directions and get the province to install them that would go along way to cleaning Ontario highways, providing some jobs for Electricians (installing), and turning the Leaf from a commuter based vehicle to one that can do trips (at least between major centers). This would probably move sale into the 500-1000 vehicle per year category (worth millions to Nissan). It would start a snowballing effect as more and more consumers would see what a Leaf could do on the highway!

As Leaf sales grow, and more drivers use them on the 401 there will start to be more congestion at the 'electon' pumps. Nissan and the province will have to monitor usage closely (at that point) to insure waiting times to recharge do not exceed 30 minutes; but those are challenges for the future. We need to get highway charging kickstarted today!

edatoakrun
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Re: I Want my (fast) DC!

Tue Apr 14, 2015 2:23 pm

With all due respect, I just don't think Ghohn (or anyone at Nissan NA, apparently) comprehends the present and future experiences of LEAF drivers with DC charging in the USA, and the I for one, am losing my patience.

Yes, if we had more competent and functional governmental agencies, on the local, state, and federal level, we already could have a network of DC charge stations suited to American driving needs, that is dependable 24 hour stations with multi-vehicle charge capability, located at strategic inter-city highway routes, at locations where drivers want to stop for food, drink, and rest during longer trips, just like already exist (to varying extents) in many other advanced economies.

But this is just not happening, in the USA, where for good or bad, we have so largely ceded most economic development questions to corporate control.

What we do have, are nearly all single DC chargers per site, making them unreliable by design, located haphazardly, and where they often are a cash drain for the hosts, rather than a means of attracting revenue through food and beverage sales to those pausing to charge.

Nissan cannot build the US infrastructure itself, but as the largest seller of BEVs in the USA, it is in a unique position to demonstrate the viability of our future DC charging infrastructure nationwide by promoting some number of convenient and reliable charge stations at some number of locations.

As an example, is there anyone who drives the Sacramento-bay area highway 80 route who wouldn't prefer one dependable (with multiple vehicle charge capability) charge station somewhere near the middle of those ~80 miles, to the ~half dozen unreliable single DCs along that route today?

Will scattering another half dozen single chargers on this route, each as likely to be broken or in use as the ones there already (which as of today, seems to be the best we can hope for) really improve your driving experience?

After over four years of USA BEV sales, why has Nissan still not approached a food or beverage chain and offered to promote their mutual profitability, by adding the attraction of DC charge stations (that BEV drivers can rely on, to have multiple DC charge points functional and available, 7/24) at some of the more heavily traveled BEV inter-city routes?

Or does Nissan really want to wait another five or ten years to hit 50,000 USA sales?

Nissan expects Leaf sales to hit 50,000

Ghosn: All we need is EV-charging network

Lindsay Chappell RSS feed
Automotive News
April 13, 2015 - 12:01 am ET

NEW YORK -- Nissan CEO Carlos Ghosn said his U.S. team should be able to raise sales of the electric Leaf to 50,000 a year, up from a little more than 30,000 last year.

But Ghosn also believes that it is not current EV technology or a lack of appeal that is holding sales back -- only the need for a bigger U.S. public battery-charging network.

Ghosn said Nissan is still working toward the first phase of factory capacity for battery modules, produced at its Smyrna, Tenn., assembly plant.

"The basic plan is based on 50,000 cars a year," he said this month at the New York auto show, when asked whether Leaf sales would support Nissan's U.S. investment in EV battery manufacturing.

"Selling 50,000 EVs in North America should not be, in my opinion, a task which is beyond our capacity," Ghosn said. "I feel very good about the capacity we have today."

But he said that more investment in EV-charging facilities is necessary by governments and public-private initiatives.

"As long as you don't have charging infrastructure, you know, we're not going to see a very strong development of the electric car," Ghosn said. "And the countries which are going to have this charging infrastructure are going to see a very big burst of zero-emission" vehicles.

He said the sales outlook is bogged down by two time-consuming obstacles:

1. Governments first must reach the decision to invest in infrastructure, then

2. The infrastructure must be constructed.

"Unfortunately, it's decisions made by government, and execution made by the states, the cities and the communities, which means that we're going to have to be patient," Ghosn said...


http://www.autonews.com/article/2015041 ... -hit-50000
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BernieTx
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Re: I Want my (fast) DC!

Thu Apr 16, 2015 12:54 am

edatoakrun wrote:With all due respect, I just don't think Ghohn (or anyone at Nissan NA, apparently) comprehends the present and future experiences of LEAF drivers with DC charging in the USA, and the I for one, am losing my patience.

Yes, if we had more competent and functional governmental agencies, on the local, state, and federal level, we already could have a network of DC charge stations suited to American driving needs, that is dependable 24 hour stations with multi-vehicle charge capability, located at strategic inter-city highway routes, at locations where drivers want to stop for food, drink, and rest during longer trips, just like already exist (to varying extents) in many other advanced economies.

But this is just not happening, in the USA, where for good or bad, we have so largely ceded most economic development questions to corporate control.


Good post; unfortunately, batteries aren't free, so I expect the 80mile range EV entry model is going to be around for the foreseeable future. And, in many locations, the expensive reliable infrastructure to drive such a limited range EV from city to city may never come to exist. The Leaf and other non Tesla EV's are local cars. Tesla is the only manufacturer selling EVs with >= 200mile range and the Tesla's come with access to a private network of fast chargers. The next gen Leaf isn't announced yet, and the Bolt doesn't go on sale for at least another year. Such 60kwh battery cars will be heavier and more expensive than the 80mile range entry EV models. So we'll get some movement on a more robust DC fast charging infrastructure when those 200mile range EV cars are actually for sale. But it will take time. Ghosn is implying that Nissan isn't aggressively pursuing EV development, perhaps because Nissan isn't making money on them. "As long as you don't have charging infrastructure, you know, we're not going to see a very strong development of the electric car".
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