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Re: PG&E Rates w/ solar & ev

Posted: Fri Sep 30, 2011 1:55 pm
by DeaneG
I went directly from E1 to E9A with net metering for Solar and the Leaf. There wasn't any "reprogramming" charge, they just changed my former smartmeter to a kV2cs. It's definitely net-metering, as I had negative peak-time energy consumption in May and June.

They told me that once I go on a TOU plan, I have to stay on that plan for at least one year (otherwise it would be more cost-effictive to switch in and out with the seasons).

Re: PG&E Rates w/ solar & ev

Posted: Sat Sep 22, 2012 10:23 am
by Spies
This seems to be a good a place as any to ask if anyone with Solar and on E9A with NET metering has been upgraded to a SmartMeter yet?

Supposedly PG&E now has NET SmartMeters available. What I don't know is if they are available with the E9A rate. http://www.pge.com/solarupgrade/

I am looking to have solar installed and operational by Summer next year and it would be nice to have an E9A NET SmartMeter installed at the time. Not only would it allow for energy usage tracking I would also save the $0.21881 a day meter charge.

Re: PG&E Rates w/ solar & ev

Posted: Sat Sep 22, 2012 3:46 pm
by Nekota
Spies wrote:This seems to be a good a place as any to ask if anyone with Solar and on E9A with NET metering has been upgraded to a SmartMeter yet?

Supposedly PG&E now has NET SmartMeters available. What I don't know is if they are available with the E9A rate. http://www.pge.com/solarupgrade/

I am looking to have solar installed and operational by Summer next year and it would be nice to have an E9A NET SmartMeter installed at the time. Not only would it allow for energy usage tracking I would also save the $0.21881 a day meter charge.


I asked same question over a year ago and I did not get an answer yet. From my experience with PGE I would simply go back to the analog meters that are also net meters as they can run backwards and know how to count down. One fellow engineer recently did that since his self installed PV system did not use pressure treated lumber for his backyard installation. And without city permit approval, PG&E would not even look at his system so he went with the mechanical meter and is very happy. I am dismayed at the poor quality of service we get from PG&E along with an almost hostile attitude toward EV's when it comes to rate structure. They are showing some progress if they have a net capable smartmeter.

Re: PG&E Rates w/ solar & ev

Posted: Thu Feb 28, 2013 2:44 pm
by greenleaf
I would like to report that my meter was swapped out for a new SMART meter last week. And today, I am finally able to see for the first time the hourly net household electrical usage on the PG&E website.

Note: I have solar and have been on PG&E's E9A net metering since 2011.

Re: PG&E Rates w/ solar & ev

Posted: Thu Feb 28, 2013 3:33 pm
by oakwcj
I've been on E-9A with solar for almost a year. E-9A is a great rate, because summer peak rates are very high and that is when your system is producing the most kWh. You are credited for production at the retail rate. You are billed each month for the unbundled distribution costs, which comes to about $12. You also receive a NEMS [net energy metering system] statement each month. The statement gets "trued up" at the end of 12 months. If you have a credit, PG&E will not necessarily pay you anything. The most you will get is a payment at its wholesale rate for producing more than you consume. The term is NSC [net surplus compensation]. In my case, I'll have a credit, even though I will have consumed more kWh than I produced. That's because I produced so much at summer peak rates, and consumed so much at off-peak rates. The net metering system is explained quite well at:

http://www.pge.com/myhome/saveenergymoney/solarenergy/nembilling/.

PG&E is going to institute its new EV rate within the next few months. Existing E-9 customers will be grandfathered in, at least until the end of 2014. The new rate may be more advantageous than E-9A if you have solar, because there will be winter peak rate periods and the rate will be even higher. The incentives change radically when you have solar.