CharlesinGA
Posts: 52
Joined: Wed Jun 10, 2015 7:14 pm
Delivery Date: 27 May 2015
Location: South of Atlanta in the sticks

Re: EVSE options for 2013+ Leafs

Thu Jun 11, 2015 8:14 am

MikeD wrote:baustin: I notice from your link that GE's DuraStation is ETL listed, but not UL listed, whereas GE's Watt-Station is both UL listed and ETL listed, as are most commercial EVSEs that I am aware of. From a safety standpoint I wonder why.

One further observation is this Installation Guide does not specify the EVSE circuit be a dedicated one, which I suspect is an (unfortunate) oversight. Contrast this rather skimpy 6 page document with the generously detailed 33 page "Installation and Operations Manual" for the VersiCharge.


I just installed a DuraStation from Home Depot, for $399 plus sales tax, free shipping. There are several different listing labs, the fact that some dual listed them and GE did not simply indicates a marketing ploy or lack of it. One listing is just as good as the other. The general public is used to seeing the UL listing label and anything else confuses them, so many manufacturers go to the expense of the UL listing when another listing lab can do the same job for less money. Since the DuraStation resembles a high school shop project anyhow, I doubt GE cared about marketing needs that the UL listing be present.

An examination of the board inside shows that it was originally designed for use possibly in some of the public use charge stations that GE makes. There is a place for an Ethernet connector to be soldered (the connector is not there, but the board is labeled Ethernet, and the holes and circuit traces are there) and there are a couple of other places where "accessories" should be that are not.

The big case doubles as a handy hanging place for the cord, and also allows for lots of room inside for the incoming wires and also for heat dissipation.

Its almost like some GE manager told some engineer to make an inexpensive product as quickly as possible and they grabbed a bunch of off the shelf parts and put one together, drafted some vague instructions and put it out there. I'm actually impressed, it should sell like hotcakes. Only the weenies who grumble about it being too "ugly" to put on the wall of their garage will bypass it and spend more money on something that does the same thing.

Note the instructions don't even tell you what voltage to connect to, since it is to be professionally installed, they expect the installer to figure it out. Mine is in a large metal building in my back yard that I fully wired and equipped myself, with EMT conduit, and this DuraStation is mounted right next to the panel, which is located between a man door and a 12w x 14h glass garage door, so the install was easy. I ordered a J1772 "holster" from a Ebay seller and screwed it to the plywood the Durastation is mounted on and this makes the installation look a little more finished, and keeps the mud daubers out of the connector when it is not in use.

Forgot to mention, since the unit is intended to be hardwired only (anything else would violate the listing) and the ability to step down in output is controlled with a jumper on the motherboard, then GE has the ability to market it as being able to be placed on smaller circuits. Other units such as the Siemens allow you the user to select the step down, and with user controlled adjustments they have to specify the largest possible circuit and not allow anything smaller.

Charles

xmetal
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Location: Sarasota, FL
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Re: EVSE options for 2013+ Leafs

Mon Jul 06, 2015 7:47 am

I just got my 2015 Leaf and wanted a semi-permanent (but easily movable) quick charge solution for my garage, so based on some forum topics here and elsewhere came up with a straightforward solution.

My home has the laundry area in the garage and I had an existing, dedicated, 240v 30-amp plug for my dryer just a few feet from where I'd need to mount the EVSE anyways. I wanted to avoid any major electrical or additions to my main panel, so I got a Clipper Creek LCS-25 with the hardwire option. I then simply ordered a Leviton Nema 10-30 plug from Amazon and wired that onto the hardwire cord. The connection was very simple, just strip a bit of the wire and then screw it into the three terminals of the plug.

This setup works perfectly, I just unplug the dryer at night and plug in the charger. It adds about 25% charge to the battery per hour. For the price it's a great solution for me and I can very easily uninstall it, hardwire it or change the plug type if I decide to. I realize it's not quite as fast as a "full speed" charger on a bigger circuit, but on the whole it was a very cost effective and flexible solution.
Paul
2015 Gun Metallic Leaf S w/ QC
2013 Mazda 5

GlennD
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Re: EVSE options for 2013+ Leafs

Sat Jul 11, 2015 12:31 pm

xmetal wrote:I just got my 2015 Leaf and wanted a semi-permanent (but easily movable) quick charge solution for my garage, so based on some forum topics here and elsewhere came up with a straightforward solution.

My home has the laundry area in the garage and I had an existing, dedicated, 240v 30-amp plug for my dryer just a few feet from where I'd need to mount the EVSE anyways. I wanted to avoid any major electrical or additions to my main panel, so I got a Clipper Creek LCS-25 with the hardwire option. I then simply ordered a Leviton Nema 10-30 plug from Amazon and wired that onto the hardwire cord. The connection was very simple, just strip a bit of the wire and then screw it into the three terminals of the plug.

This setup works perfectly, I just unplug the dryer at night and plug in the charger. It adds about 25% charge to the battery per hour. For the price it's a great solution for me and I can very easily uninstall it, hardwire it or change the plug type if I decide to. I realize it's not quite as fast as a "full speed" charger on a bigger circuit, but on the whole it was a very cost effective and flexible solution.


The dryer outlet works well for many. On a 30A circuit you can charge at 24A. That is pretty close to the Leaf's 27.5A.

This is a great solution for renters or anyone that does not want to have a dedicated line installed.

The main problem is wear and tear on the socket. NEC does not allow a switchbox, only one device connected at a time.

here in Southern California most dryers are gas. If you have an electric outlet it can be dedicated to the EVSE avoiding the socket wear and tear.

The Clipper Creek EVSE is a 20A unit so there is no danger of over loading the circuit and it is plenty for a complete overnight charge. Their model numbers refer to the circuit needed, not the charging current.
2012 Cayenne Red SL traded for:
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Traded for a Cirrus White 2014 Mercedes B (totaled)
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DCelectric
Posts: 8
Joined: Thu Feb 18, 2016 9:39 am
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Tesla and Nissan Leaf EVSE Option

Tue Feb 23, 2016 10:48 am

Hi...We have a Nissan Leaf but will buy a Tesla in 6 months. I want to install a wall mounted charger that works for both Nissan and Tesla. Does anyone the specs I need the electrician to do this installation and EVSE charger (for example, min 40 amps)? I was going to have the electrician install a 240V outlet and then just purchase a plug-in charger but this might not be as efficient (after reading all the other posts/comments in the forum).
Many thanks,Adam
2013 SL Leaf

wmcbrine
Posts: 63
Joined: Sun Aug 09, 2015 3:23 am

Re: Tesla and Nissan Leaf EVSE Option

Tue Feb 23, 2016 12:24 pm

DCelectric wrote:Hi...We have a Nissan Leaf but will buy a Tesla in 6 months. I want to install a wall mounted charger that works for both Nissan and Tesla. Does anyone the specs I need the electrician to do this installation and EVSE charger (for example, min 40 amps)? I was going to have the electrician install a 240V outlet and then just purchase a plug-in charger but this might not be as efficient (after reading all the other posts/comments in the forum).
Many thanks,Adam

Tesla doesn't need an EVSE. Do the outlet thing. You want a NEMA 14-50, with a 50 amp breaker (which you'll only run at 40 amps continuous load).

There's no meaningful loss of efficiency from a plug-in vs. hardwired EVSE, dunno where you got that. Hardwired is sometimes preferred for outdoor installations.

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dgpcolorado
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Re: Tesla and Nissan Leaf EVSE Option

Tue Feb 23, 2016 12:48 pm

DCelectric wrote:Hi...We have a Nissan Leaf but will buy a Tesla in 6 months. I want to install a wall mounted charger that works for both Nissan and Tesla. Does anyone the specs I need the electrician to do this installation and EVSE charger (for example, min 40 amps)? I was going to have the electrician install a 240V outlet and then just purchase a plug-in charger but this might not be as efficient (after reading all the other posts/comments in the forum).
Many thanks,Adam
Any standard J1772 wall mount EVSE will work for the LEAF and the Tesla (with the supplied adapter). While the Tesla will come with a 50 amp (40 amp usable) EVSE they call a UMC, it won't work for a LEAF. So, if you want to install just one device, a standard EVSE of the sort you can get from Home Depot will suffice for both cars. Whether you get an EVSE that is hard wired or plug-in is up to you.

If your electrical panel can handle it, I suggest installing a 50 amp 14-50 receptacle and then getting an EVSE that you can plug-in to that (perhaps with an appropriate adapter) or just hard wire the EVSE to the 50 amp circuit, if you prefer. If you want to charge the Tesla at 40 amps you ought to get an EVSE that is rated for that much current. But when charging overnight, the difference between 24 amps, 32 amps or 40 amps really isn't significant and any of those currents will suffice for both a LEAF or a Tesla. For example:

24 amps x 240 volts = 5.76 kW, or about 6 hours to add 30 kWh to the battery (counting charging losses).
32 amps x 240 volts = 7.68 kW, or about 4½ hours to add 30 kWh to the battery (this is more than the current LEAF models can use since they are limited to 6.6 kW)
40 amps x 240 volts = 9.6 kW, or about 3½ hours to add 30 kWh to the battery (this is near the maximum for a Tesla Model S with a single charger)

How much charge one needs depends on the typical mileage one drives. In mild conditions you might get 3.3 miles/kWh for the Tesla and 4 miles/kWh for the LEAF. For slow speeds or other efficient driving you might get numbers considerably higher (I do). Winter driving and heater use will usually give lower numbers.
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DCelectric
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Re: EVSE options for 2013+ Leafs

Tue Feb 23, 2016 2:57 pm

Wow. Thanks. This is great advice.

I was looking at the JuiceBox Pro. I know it has 40amp which is more than I need for a Leaf but I'm just thinking about future usage. Plus it is not much more than the ClipperCreek LCS-25P, 20 amp, NEMA 14-50 (note: JuiceBox has an offer that prices the Pro to about $550).

Do you have any experience with this company?

Again, thanks for sharing your knowledge and experience.
2013 SL Leaf

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dgpcolorado
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Re: EVSE options for 2013+ Leafs

Tue Feb 23, 2016 3:23 pm

DCelectric wrote:Wow. Thanks. This is great advice.

I was looking at the JuiceBox Pro. I know it has 40amp which is more than I need for a Leaf but I'm just thinking about future usage. Plus it is not much more than the ClipperCreek LCS-25P, 20 amp, NEMA 14-50 (note: JuiceBox has an offer that prices the Pro to about $550).

Do you have any experience with this company?

Again, thanks for sharing your knowledge and experience.
I don't have any experience with them but there are others here who do.

I've been using EVSEupgrade for my LEAF but the early Nissan/Panasonic EVSEs (2011/2012) won't work with Teslas according to EVSEupgrade. So, I put in a 14-50 receptacle and will use that with the Tesla UMC when the car gets delivered (next week, I hope). I expect to trade-in the LEAF because I don't need two cars.
Blue 2012 SV Dec 2011 to Feb 2016
CPO 2014 Tesla S60 Mar 2016
One car, no ICE, at last!

inphoenix
Posts: 249
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Delivery Date: 30 Sep 2015
Location: Phoenix! AZ

Re: EVSE options for 2013+ Leafs

Tue Feb 23, 2016 4:33 pm

DCelectric wrote:Wow. Thanks. This is great advice.

I was looking at the JuiceBox Pro. I know it has 40amp which is more than I need for a Leaf but I'm just thinking about future usage. Plus it is not much more than the ClipperCreek LCS-25P, 20 amp, NEMA 14-50 (note: JuiceBox has an offer that prices the Pro to about $550).

Do you have any experience with this company?

Again, thanks for sharing your knowledge and experience.


I have a JuiceBox Pro 40 and absolutely love it !! A Great product with great customer service.
2014 S/QC - dropped first bar at 28K, second at 32.5K, going back in April '17.
2015 Tesla MS
JuiceBox Pro 40A EVSE

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TonyWilliams
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Re: EVSE options for 2013+ Leafs

Tue Feb 23, 2016 5:29 pm

JESLA is the 40 amp (9.6kW) J1772 / Type 1 premium portable charging cable works at up to full power on every known J1772 equipped vehicle in the world.

Here's a nice article, written by one of our customers:

http://www.wind-works.org/cms/index.php ... 4c0efca8ad

JESLA was designed specifically with the unique 40 amp Tesla onboard charger that is in a Mercedes B-Class ED, Toyota RAV4 EV, and of course Tesla cars, but it also works equally fantastic with cars like the BMW i3, Fiat 500e, Chevy Volt, Kia Soul EV or Nissan LEAF. It is ultra flexible, light weight (only 8 pounds total!), and portable, PLUS it adjusts from 100 to 250 volts and 12 to 40 amps, automatically. You don't have to know anything about electricity and no installation required;

Just Plug-N-Charge(tm)!!!

http://shop.quickchargepower.com/JESLA- ... -JESLA.htm

JELSA ships with NEMA 14-50 and NEMA 5-15 plugs, a padlock, plus a carrying bag. Additionally, you may want to buy the correct plug for your dryer (handy for visiting friends or relatives at their house) or for motel air conditioners:

...........................................VOLTS / AMPS.....kW
NEMA 5-15* ......Standard Outlet.. 120 V / 12 A...... 1.4 kW
NEMA 6-15 .......Air Conditioners.. 240 V / 12 A ..... 2.8kW
NEMA 5-20 ...... Motel A/C .......... 120 V / 16 A....... 1.9 kW
NEMA 14-50*.....RV Parks ........... 240 V / 40 A...... 9.6 kW

*included plugs

http://shop.quickchargepower.com/search ... ds=adapter

**********

Be sure to get a 50 amp circuit installed at your charging location with a NEMA 14-50R receptacle. We sell the receptacle here for just $5.99 (cheaper than Home Depot or Lowes):

http://shop.quickchargepower.com/14-50R ... 14-50R.htm



Thanks,

Tony Williams
R&D Manager
Quick Charge Power LLC

*************

Charge Station Federal Tax Credit

In case you hadn’t already heard the great news, we are pleased to announce you can once again take advantage of a federal tax credit for installing electric vehicle charging stations at your home or business.

Congress has renewed the "Alternate Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit", which provides a tax credit of 30% (up to $1000 credit) of the pruchase and installation cost of electric vehicle charging stattions. The tax credit is valid for all 2016 installations.

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