webb14leafs
Posts: 146
Joined: Mon Mar 27, 2017 9:43 am
Delivery Date: 27 Mar 2017

New Tires

Thu Jun 08, 2017 4:52 am

I need to replace the tires on my leaf for the first time. Can I just get any tires that fit, or are there other considerations?

Also, how does the mileage warranty work for a Leaf? I understand that the Leaf wears out tires much sooner than most cars.

Thanks

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DNAinaGoodWay
Posts: 2756
Joined: Mon Dec 17, 2012 1:43 am
Delivery Date: 03 Dec 2012
Leaf Number: 23156
Location: Central Massachusetts

Re: New Tires

Sat Jun 24, 2017 7:11 am

There's tons of tire threads on this forum. Try the search function.
'12 SL last reading @ 2 yr, 22k, 260 GIDs, 62.35 Ahr

'15 SV w/QC, Mfd 5/14, Leased 8/14, 292 GIDs, 64.38 Ahr when new
@ 36 months, 34k, 270 GID, 57.49 Ahr

'17 Bolt LT



6.72 kW Array

NeilBlanchard
Posts: 607
Joined: Sat Oct 11, 2014 5:02 pm
Delivery Date: 14 Oct 2014
Leaf Number: 306278

Re: New Tires

Wed Jun 28, 2017 9:59 am

webb14leafs wrote:I need to replace the tires on my leaf for the first time. Can I just get any tires that fit, or are there other considerations?

Also, how does the mileage warranty work for a Leaf? I understand that the Leaf wears out tires much sooner than most cars.

Thanks


The stock tires are very low rolling resistance, and getting similar tires will help you not take a big hit on the range. (though all new tires have higher RR than old tires.)

How does the mileage warranty relate to the tires?

No, the Leaf is no different on tire wear than any other car.

4CloverLeaf
Posts: 27
Joined: Fri Mar 24, 2017 2:23 pm
Delivery Date: 23 Mar 2017
Location: Colorado

Re: New Tires

Wed Jul 05, 2017 8:41 am

The recommended tire pressure on the Leaf is a little too low which results in increased wear on the outer edges of the tires. Many Leaf owners add a few lbs of pressure to each tire to help the tires live longer.

Mileage warranties on tires are normally not worth the paper they are printed on as the manner in which the car is driven is the biggest factor in wear. If your tires wear out before the warranty period is over, they will just tell you that you drove too aggressively and deny the claim. The warranty is really only from defects not related to wear. Uneducated consumers still buy tires based off them being 60k miles or whatever but that is a basic estimate and inconsistent between manufacturers. You are best served looking at tire reviews and remembering that your tires are the only thing that connects you to the road and are the determining factor in how quickly you can turn or slow down before you lose control. I.e. Don't buy the cheapest tires you can find if you value safety. A car's brakes do not determine how quickly the car can stop, the car's tires do. If you buy junk tires, don't be surprised when your stopping distance is increased and you rear end someone during an emergency stop.

Low rolling resistance tires will increase your car's range but at the cost of traction. Everyone needs to decide for themselves where they want to fall in that trade off. Personally, I much prefer good rubber to an extra five miles of range and happily make the trade off but if range is an actual issue for you, you may not be as willing as I am to forgo low rolling resistance tires.

sub3marathonman
Posts: 306
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2010 11:57 am
Delivery Date: 31 Mar 2012
Location: Bartow, FL

Re: New Tires

Wed Jul 05, 2017 9:03 am

4CloverLeaf wrote:Low rolling resistance tires will increase your car's range but at the cost of traction. Everyone needs to decide for themselves where they want to fall in that trade off. Personally, I much prefer good rubber to an extra five miles of range and happily make the trade off but if range is an actual issue for you, you may not be as willing as I am to forgo low rolling resistance tires.


If the LEAF was an ICE, I would agree with slightly higher rolling resistance, but with the LEAF, there are really only two wear items adding to the cost per mile, the battery (oh, I had to mention it) and the tires. Those extra miles will result in slightly less wear and tear on the battery, which is the by a far margin the major cost of driving the LEAF.

As far as the tires, I'd say Nissan did an excellent job choosing the Ecopias. The OEM ones lasted 45K miles for me, and yes, I kept them at 42 psi, and drove around corners like an old lady. Now with owning the LEAF, I've also concluded that tires will last a lot longer going at 48 mph as opposed to 60+.

I got a replacement set from Tire Rack, and you can then choose a local installer from their website too. I was extremely happy with Cannon Buick here in Lakeland, but of course that only helps somebody close here in Central Florida.

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Randy
Moderator
Posts: 2064
Joined: Thu Apr 22, 2010 12:29 pm
Delivery Date: 04 Jan 2011
Leaf Number: 0191
Location: San Diego, CA

Re: New Tires

Wed Jul 05, 2017 11:08 am

For my second set of LEAF tires, I bought another set of Bridgestone Ecopias from Discount tire when my car had 25,000 miles, and even with increased pressure of 45 psi to avoid front wear, they only lasted until 50,000 miles.

Discount Tire gave me pro-rated warranty credit when I bought my third set of tires. I did have to pay standard installation costs, which would have been the same at 25,000 miles of wear or 50,000 miles of wear. So from that standpoint, it does cost the customer a little extra money to buy new tires even under warranty...

But to counter the post above, they made no effort to deny my warranty on the tires. I had them rotated promptly and wear was even on all 4. While the Ecopias do provide that low rolling resistance that we enjoy for maximum mileage, they just don't last that long on the LEAF....

eatsleafsandshoots
Posts: 71
Joined: Wed Oct 16, 2013 5:23 pm
Delivery Date: 16 Oct 2013
Location: Denver, CO

Re: New Tires

Wed Jul 05, 2017 12:09 pm

The Ecopias suck if you like twisty roads and taking them at speed. The shoulders wear down in just a few thousand miles on rough, twisty CO mountain roads.

There are other LRR tires with better durability.

4CloverLeaf
Posts: 27
Joined: Fri Mar 24, 2017 2:23 pm
Delivery Date: 23 Mar 2017
Location: Colorado

Re: New Tires

Wed Jul 05, 2017 2:28 pm

sub3marathonman wrote:
If the LEAF was an ICE, I would agree with slightly higher rolling resistance, but with the LEAF, there are really only two wear items adding to the cost per mile, the battery (oh, I had to mention it) and the tires. Those extra miles will result in slightly less wear and tear on the battery, which is the by a far margin the major cost of driving the LEAF.


The cost of the small percentage extra wear on the battery can't ever come close to the cost of fixing me if I am ever in a crash. I value my safety much higher then some additional wear on my battery. Plus, my battery came with a warranty where my neck does not.

There is no way around the trade off. If you want the highest possible range, you are going to sacrifice traction. How much range and traction a person wants is their own decision and there is no right answer that applies to everyone. I do know that most of the time EVs go out to drive they don't need their maximum range or the maximum traction so...

MalcolmReynolds
Posts: 51
Joined: Sat Jun 10, 2017 10:39 am
Delivery Date: 04 Jul 2017

Re: New Tires

Wed Jul 05, 2017 6:13 pm

If you have an ECO, LRR focus and want every mile you can get out of your battery then here are a few things I pay close attention to on the LRR tires.

List in no particular order:
1. The weight of the tire, the lighter the weight the better.
2. Look for the narrowest tread pattern. The larger the contact patch on the ground the more resistance, and also a larger frontal area increase the aero drag.
3. Look for tires that will allow higher max PSI. I tend to run my tires at the max sidewall pressure for the lowest resistance and better tire wear.
4. Pay attention to the tire diameter. If the tire you are looking at is larger in diameter than the stock tires then your speed and odometer readings will be affected and it may appear you are getting more or less miles per charge than before. It is a good idea to use a GPS and known distance mile markers to evaluate how close your speed and distance are with any new tire.
5. Of course look for tires that advertise they are a LRR tire, however that does not mean they will measure up to the stock tires in miles/kilometers per charge. The other factors we just listed will come into play.
6. Look for larger numbers for the UTQG which will typically indicate longer tire wear as well as possibly better performance.

Right now just based on the specs I can see on Tire Rack for my 2013 SL and tires with an ECO focus so far the specs would lead me to believe that the the Ecopias are still at the top with a 6.8" tread width, 22lbs per tire, 50psi max tire pressure, and a UTQG of 640 which isn't great, but given it's competitors it looks like it will be good enough. Next behind that it appears the Firestone Champion Fuel Figher may be a decent LRR challenger with a 6.9 tread width, 50psi, 22lbs, 817 rpm, and a UTQG of 600 which isn't as good as the Ecopias. But it looks like that tire should come very close in ECO performance to the Ecopias.

Most of the other tires in the list have a much wider tread pattern, some weigh more, and there are other clues that they are probably better performers than the Ecopias or the Champions, but they appear to be sacrificing that ultimate fuel economy badge. So based on what I can see so far it appears the Ecopias still have the lead for fuel economy. At least of those tires that Tire Rack is spitting out for tires that fit my SL.
=======================================
"Serenity" 2013 SL 12 bars 39k+ miles and counting
Zencar 32a EVSE

Jedlacks
Posts: 149
Joined: Sun Dec 14, 2014 12:10 pm
Delivery Date: 29 May 2016
Location: Kennesaw, GA

Re: New Tires YMMV

Wed Jul 05, 2017 6:49 pm

I had LRR tires on my Volvo up to a year ago when I sold it.

The Volvo weighed about 3,232 lbs (wikipedia)
The Volvo used 195/60 15 tires

My SV Leaf weighs 3,291 lbs (wikipedia)... I'm too lazy to go to the garage.
The Leaf uses 205/55 16 tires

Comparing the two cars that are similar in weight and a little different in tire size are not apples to apples, but I cannot say that people should feel unsafe driving the Leaf like a commuter car. If you treat it like a "Hot Hatch" you will have issues beyond tire life. Are the factory Ecopias the best tires out there? I don't know, because I have 31,000 on mine and I think they will last to 40,000+ before the wear bars are exposed.

If you do "spirited" driving you will wear the all tires down.
2015 SV QC/LED
Juicebox 40A

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