powersurge
Posts: 714
Joined: Wed Oct 21, 2015 10:24 am
Delivery Date: 06 Dec 2014
Location: Long Island, NY

Re: Univ of Utah studies find up to 27 seconds of mental distraction for drivers after using new hands-free technologies

Fri Jan 27, 2017 8:58 am

Let's agree on something... the term "distracted" is not a measurable term... We have been listening to the radio, music, news, and talk radio since there have been radios on cars... Saying that listening to the radio or audio tapes is dangerous is BS...
The REAL danger are the stupid people who drive on the highway, or even regular roads while looking down away from the road to text, dial, or work their ever-growing dashboard TV screens... They kill people because they are moving at highway speeds and are not looking at the road for long periods of time.

That original article was really bad research that people will latch on. I am sure that some have found that water and air are bad for your health...

GRA
Posts: 7359
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Univ of Utah studies find up to 27 seconds of mental distraction for drivers after using new hands-free technologies

Fri Jan 27, 2017 3:54 pm

powersurge wrote:Let's agree on something... the term "distracted" is not a measurable term... We have been listening to the radio, music, news, and talk radio since there have been radios on cars... Saying that listening to the radio or audio tapes is dangerous is BS...
The REAL danger are the stupid people who drive on the highway, or even regular roads while looking down away from the road to text, dial, or work their ever-growing dashboard TV screens... They kill people because they are moving at highway speeds and are not looking at the road for long periods of time.

That original article was really bad research that people will latch on. I am sure that some have found that water and air are bad for your health...
Join the campaign to ban Dihydrogen Monoxide!
Dihydrogen Monoxide (DHMO) is a colorless and odorless chemical compound, also referred to by some as Dihydrogen Oxide, Hydrogen Hydroxide, Hydronium Hydroxide, or simply Hydric acid. Its basis is the highly reactive hydroxyl radical, a species shown to mutate DNA, denature proteins, disrupt cell membranes, and chemically alter critical neurotransmitters. The atomic components of DHMO are found in a number of caustic, explosive and poisonous compounds such as Sulfuric Acid, Nitroglycerine and Ethyl Alcohol. . . .
http://www.dhmo.org/facts.html

;)
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 7359
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Univ of Utah studies find up to 27 seconds of mental distraction for drivers after using new hands-free technologies

Thu Oct 05, 2017 3:35 pm

A follow-on to the study in the topic title, via GCC:
Univ. of Utah study finds many infotainment systems too distracting to be used when vehicle in motion
http://www.greencarcongress.com/2017/10/20171005-utah.html

Many of the infotainment features in most 2017 vehicles are so distracting they should not be enabled while a vehicle is in motion, according to a new study by University of Utah researchers. The study, led by University of Utah Psychology Professor David L. Strayer, found In-Vehicle Information Systems take drivers’ attention off the road for too long to be safe.

The study, conducted the study for the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, reviewed infotainment systems in 30 different 2017 vehicles. Participants were required to engage in four types of tasks using voice, touch screen and other interactive technologies. The tasks were to make a call, send a text message, tune the radio or program navigation while driving.

The team developed an advanced rating scale to measure which tasks were most distracting, how they affect visual, cognitive and manual demands on drivers and whether interactions were easier to perform in some vehicles than others. The scale ranged from low to very high demand; low demand is equivalent to listening to the radio, while very high demand is equivalent to balance a checkbook in your head while driving, according to AAA.

The researchers found drivers using features such as voice-based and touch-screen technology took their hands, eyes and mind off the road for more than 24 seconds to complete tasks.

Previous research from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration found that the risk of a crash doubles when a driver takes his or her eyes off the road for two seconds. . . .

In the new study, [b]programming navigation was the most distracting task
—taking drivers on average 40 seconds to complete. When driving at 25 mph, a driver can travel the length of four football fields during the time it could take to enter a destination in navigation—all while distracted from the important task of driving.

Text messaging was the second most distracting task; audio entertainment and calling and dialing were the easiest to perform and did not significantly differ in overall demand.

The researchers also found surprisingly large differences between vehicles as far as workload required to operate the systems. None of the 30 vehicle infotainment systems produced low demand, while 23 systems generated high or very high levels of demand on drivers.

The researchers found that most infotainment systems tested could easily be made safer by simply following clearly stated federal recommendations such as locking out text messaging, social media and programming navigation while the car is in motion. In 2012, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) released a set of voluntary safety guidelines advising automakers to block access to tasks when vehicles are not parked. . . .

There are charts showing the vehicles tested as well as their distraction levels.

The full AAA report (104 pages) can be found here:
Visual and
Cognitive Demands
of Using In-Vehicle
Infotainment Systems
https://publicaffairsresources.aaa.biz/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/CDST_Final_Report.pdf
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

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