Herm
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Location: Timbuktu, Mali

Re: Put some air in those tires!

Sun Apr 07, 2013 8:05 am

You can also tweak tire pressure to adjust handling.. if you want to race but then you are abusing your Leaf. Tires are severely over-engineered when it comes to maximum pressure, you can DOUBLE the max ratings without issues. Many believe the stock OEM Ecrapias have been modified from what you find at tire stores, thinner walls to reduce weight and thus increased advertised range.

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TomT
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Leaf Number: 000360
Location: Foothills of Granada Hills, CA
Contact: Website

Re: Put some air in those tires!

Sun Apr 07, 2013 8:22 am

I would like to see a credible reference for this statement. I seriously doubt you will find anyone anywhere who is an actual tire expert that would even remotely agree with such a concept or notion. To suggest that anyone do so is simply dangerous, ill-advised and foolhardy, and could lead them to serious injury or death! Do not ever exceed the maximum sidewall pressure unless you relish the role of a test pilot...

Herm wrote:Tires are severely over-engineered when it comes to maximum pressure, you can DOUBLE the max ratings without issues.
59,991 miles/12 bars/289 Gids/68.54 AHr/101% SOH/101.64% Hx 7May15 w/ new Lizard (barely made the warranty).
71,770 miles/12 bars/256 Gids/59.04 AHr/88% SOH/87.92% Hx 3Mar16 at lease return.

Now driving a 2016 Volt Premier. Model 3 reserved.

thankyouOB
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Location: Coastal LA

Re: Put some air in those tires!

Sun Apr 07, 2013 8:34 am

Tom,
of course, the idea of doubling your tire PSI is ridiculous and dangerous.
Herm says he lives in Mali.
Everything he says bears the same relationship with reality as that. It is all tongue in cheek.
may reserve/delivery 4/30/11
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ECOtality/LADWP/ Blink 4/4/11
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red SL with etec L3
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TomT
Posts: 10564
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Location: Foothills of Granada Hills, CA
Contact: Website

Re: Put some air in those tires!

Sun Apr 07, 2013 8:49 am

Well, it IS true that I have a hard time taking much of what he espouses seriously! :lol:

thankyouOB wrote:Tom,
Herm says he lives in Mali.
Everything he says bears the same relationship with reality as that. It is all tongue in cheek.
59,991 miles/12 bars/289 Gids/68.54 AHr/101% SOH/101.64% Hx 7May15 w/ new Lizard (barely made the warranty).
71,770 miles/12 bars/256 Gids/59.04 AHr/88% SOH/87.92% Hx 3Mar16 at lease return.

Now driving a 2016 Volt Premier. Model 3 reserved.

Herm
Posts: 3765
Joined: Sun May 23, 2010 3:08 pm
Delivery Date: 29 Aug 2012
Location: Timbuktu, Mali

Re: Put some air in those tires!

Sun Apr 07, 2013 9:42 am

Good luck finding that actually printed somewhere.. your best bet is looking up some obscure Fed regulation on determining the max rating..

thankyouOB
Posts: 3576
Joined: Mon Feb 21, 2011 11:14 am
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Re: Put some air in those tires!

Sun Apr 07, 2013 9:56 am

timbuktu has federal regulations?
may reserve/delivery 4/30/11
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ECOtality/LADWP/ Blink 4/4/11
--
Gardena Nissan, msrp -1k
red SL with etec L3
SOLAR POWERED since 2008

RLewisCA
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Joined: Fri Mar 22, 2013 9:38 am
Delivery Date: 22 Mar 2013
Location: SoCal

Re: Put some air in those tires!

Sun Apr 07, 2013 2:52 pm

I worked in the tire industry for a tire manufacturer in the warranty department for several years, so I do actually have a solid background in this.

Any given tire can be used on any number of different vehicles. These vehicles will almost certainly have a variety of curb weights, max weights, and front/rear weight distributions (within a certain range, of course, if the same tire is used) and different drive systems (front, rear. AWD, etc.). The tire manufacturer may know SOME of the vehicles the tire will be used on when when they design the tire and start manufacturing it, but the tire manufacturer by no means knows ALL of the vehicles the tire will be used on during the manufacturing lifecycle of that particular model/size/speed rating. So, all a tire manufacturer can do is provide information on what it knows for sure - the maximum load the tire can support AND THE TIRE PRESSURE NEEDED IN ORDER TO SUPPORT THAT MAXIMUM WEIGHT. That is the psi that is molded on the sidewall of the tire. It is not a recommended pressure, it is the pressure that is necessary for the tire to support it's maximum weight.

Vehicle manufacturers know what the curb weight of their vehicles are. They know what the maximum weight of their vehicles are. They know what the front/rear weight balance is. They know whether the vehicle is front or rear wheel drive. They know what tire size and speed rating is original equipment on the vehicle. Therefore, it is for the vehicle manufacturer to determine the correct PSI for the front and rear tires so that those tires will support the appropriate weight on the front and rear of the vehicle.

There is a danger is both under-inflating and over-inflating tires on any vehicle. Underinflation will most certainly lead to a buildup of heat at higher speeds and produce much higher failure rates as a result (tread separations, sidewall separations, sidewall blowouts, etc.).

Overinflation will often result in additional cabin noise, as well as inferior cornering, stopping, acceleration and wet performance. Both conditions will likely produce uneven and premature tire wear. Over-inflation in particular will produce premature wear on the center 1/3 of the tread. This can be especially dangerous in wet weather because the car owner may look at the outer tread, see there is sufficient depth to drive safely, however the center of the tread could be almost fully worn, and because the tire is over-inflated, the center of the tread is supporting the most weight and making the most consistent contact with the road.

If driving in wet weather, if the center of the tread does not have sufficient depth to evacuate the water on the road from the tire's surface, this will result in hydroplaning.

The point is - follow the recommended PSI from the vehicle manufacturer, found inside the driver's door jam - not the psi molded onto the sidewall of the tire. Not doing so will most certainly void your tire warranty.

In my years working for a tire manufacturer, I found myself in a position to of having to deny many warranty claims because the owner 'followed the psi molded onto the sidewall of the tire' and not the vehicle manufacture's recommendations, and damage to their tires resulted.
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Nubo
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Re: Put some air in those tires!

Sun Apr 07, 2013 8:09 pm

RLewisCA wrote:...Overinflation will often result in additional cabin noise, as well as inferior cornering, stopping, acceleration and wet performance. Both conditions will likely produce uneven and premature tire wear. Over-inflation in particular will produce premature wear on the center 1/3 of the tread. This can be especially dangerous in wet weather because the car owner may look at the outer tread, see there is sufficient depth to drive safely, however the center of the tread could be almost fully worn, and because the tire is over-inflated, the center of the tread is supporting the most weight and making the most consistent contact with the road.

If driving in wet weather, if the center of the tread does not have sufficient depth to evacuate the water on the road from the tire's surface, this will result in hydroplaning.

The point is - follow the recommended PSI from the vehicle manufacturer, found inside the driver's door jam - not the psi molded onto the sidewall of the tire. Not doing so will most certainly void your tire warranty.


Interestingly, I've read a number of reports of the LEAF OEM tires, at Nissan-recommended pressures, which experienced excessive shoulder wear.
I noticed you're still working with polymers.

Volusiano
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Location: Phoenix, AZ

Re: Put some air in those tires!

Sun Apr 07, 2013 8:15 pm

Nubo wrote:
RLewisCA wrote:...Overinflation will often result in additional cabin noise, as well as inferior cornering, stopping, acceleration and wet performance. Both conditions will likely produce uneven and premature tire wear. Over-inflation in particular will produce premature wear on the center 1/3 of the tread. This can be especially dangerous in wet weather because the car owner may look at the outer tread, see there is sufficient depth to drive safely, however the center of the tread could be almost fully worn, and because the tire is over-inflated, the center of the tread is supporting the most weight and making the most consistent contact with the road.

If driving in wet weather, if the center of the tread does not have sufficient depth to evacuate the water on the road from the tire's surface, this will result in hydroplaning.

The point is - follow the recommended PSI from the vehicle manufacturer, found inside the driver's door jam - not the psi molded onto the sidewall of the tire. Not doing so will most certainly void your tire warranty.


Interestingly, I've read a number of reports of the LEAF OEM tires, at Nissan-recommended pressures, which experienced excessive shoulder wear.
I can back this up. My LEAF's tires barely lasted me 17K miles before I had to replace them due to excessive shoulder wear. I don't drive my LEAF aggressively at all. Had them rotated at 7.5K and 15K per mfg recommendation.

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ebill3
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Location: Puyallup WA

Re: Put some air in those tires!

Sun Apr 07, 2013 8:20 pm

RLewisCA wrote:I worked in the tire industry for a tire manufacturer in the warranty department for several years, so I do actually have a solid background in this.
.......................................(didn't think it necessary to repeat the whole post, but a good read).......................
The point is - follow the recommended PSI from the vehicle manufacturer, found inside the driver's door jam - not the psi molded onto the sidewall of the tire. Not doing so will most certainly void your tire warranty.

In my years working for a tire manufacturer, I found myself in a position to of having to deny many warranty claims because the owner 'followed the psi molded onto the sidewall of the tire' and not the vehicle manufacture's recommendations, and damage to their tires resulted.
Thank you, appreciate your insight. To me, sounds like words to live by.
All electric - red LEAF, green Tesla S. No ICE.

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