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DNAinaGoodWay
Posts: 2740
Joined: Mon Dec 17, 2012 1:43 am
Delivery Date: 03 Dec 2012
Leaf Number: 23156
Location: Central Massachusetts

Re: Our solar production

Mon Jan 09, 2017 6:25 pm

Wet and sunny? You must have that ideal of rain mostly at night. I'd like that.

Last year was the first time we produced more power than we used, but just barely. Made 9610 kWh, used 9603. That surprised me.
'12 SL last reading @ 2 yr, 22k, 260 GIDs, 62.35 Ahr

'15 SV w/QC, Mfd 5/14, Leased 8/14, 292 GIDs, 64.38 Ahr when new
@ 36 months, 34k, 270 GID, 57.49 Ahr

'17 Bolt LT



6.72 kW Array

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RegGuheert
Posts: 5548
Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2012 4:12 am
Delivery Date: 16 Mar 2012
Leaf Number: 5926
Location: Northern VA

Re: Our solar production

Tue Jan 10, 2017 6:10 am

DNAinaGoodWay wrote:Wet and sunny? You must have that ideal of rain mostly at night. I'd like that.
I've often thought that would be the ideal, too! But then I realized that would likely cause us to overheat.

I think it was more that we caught enough of the thunderstorms to keep it from getting overly dry this year. Some years those thunderstorms just pass us by every time, sometimes to the north and sometimes to the south.
DNAinaGoodWay wrote:Last year was the first time we produced more power than we used, but just barely. Made 9610 kWh, used 9603. That surprised me.
I'm guessing you do not heat with electricity. We actually heated with wood pellets for about three days over the weekend since it was so cold. Back to electricity now...

In terms of our 12-month running net consumption, we had managed to be barely ahead at the end of November by 80 kWh. But it's been pretty cold since then. Plus January 2016 set production records here, so not much chance of a repeat. As of today, we're net consumers of about 400 kWh over the past 12 months. We still have 1.4 MWh stored up, but I don't expect that to last through February.
RegGuheert
2011 Leaf SL Demo vehicle
2011 miles at purchase. 10K miles on Apr 14, 2013. 20K miles (55.7Ah) on Aug 7, 2014, 30K miles (52.0Ah) on Dec 30, 2015, 40K miles (49.8Ah) on Feb 8, 2017.
Enphase Inverter Measured MTBF: M190, M215, M250, S280

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dgpcolorado
Posts: 2955
Joined: Sat Aug 20, 2011 1:56 pm
Delivery Date: 15 Dec 2011
Location: The Western Slope, Colorado

Re: Our solar production

Thu Feb 02, 2017 2:14 pm

January was unusually cloudy (and warm) here this year. I was not surprised to find that my solar production for the month was the second worst in the 8½ years I have been tracking it, a measly 157 kWh (December 2010 was my record low production). Until the last four days of the month (when the sun finally returned and the weather was clear and cold, as it should be in winter) I had only one sunny and one mostly sunny day! And lots of snow and rain (rain? in January?) and glare ice on my driveway, a first in my 32 years in Colorado. If this is what I can expect from global warming I don't much like it. :(

Code: Select all

Solar production for January:

          Old Panels    Old+New Panels
Jan-09      77 kWh
Jan-10      76 kWh
Jan-11      88 kWh
Jan-12      93 kWh
Jan-13      88 kWh      247 kWh
Jan-14      95 kWh      262 kWh
Jan-15      84 kWh      235 kWh
Jan-16      82 kWh      227 kWh
Jan-17      58 kWh      157 kWh (!)


Image

^ Model S60 and fuel source.

Image

^ Panels in early morning before pulling the snow off of them.

Image

^ My 400 foot driveway before shoveling (the tracks are from a resident mule deer).
Blue 2012 SV Dec 2011 to Feb 2016
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RegGuheert
Posts: 5548
Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2012 4:12 am
Delivery Date: 16 Mar 2012
Leaf Number: 5926
Location: Northern VA

Re: Our solar production

Thu Feb 02, 2017 3:41 pm

Just like dgpcolorado, we also experienced warm and cloudy weather in January. Our system set a new January LOW production record of only 756 kWh. That's even below the partial-month result of January 2011 of 669 kWh (which when multiplied by 1.29 comes to 863 kWh).

The peak production day for January was on the 25th at 64.6 kWh. This falls short of the daily record for January of 69.0 kWh which was set on January 10, 2015 and again on January 18, 2016.

Below are all our numbers for 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017 along with the PVWatts predictions for the old array (PVW42: good through June 2014) and the new array (PVW54: good starting with July 2014):

Code: Select all

Month    PVW42   2011   2012   2013   2014   2015   2016   2017  PVW54  Units
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
January    916    669    869    822    857   1006   1300    756   1229   kWh
February   702    158   1085    866   1054   1361   1192           915   kWh
March      965      0   1350   1152   1113   1547   1498          1240   kWh
April     1465      0   1465   1495   1338   1737   1754          1899   kWh
May       1583      0   1477   1491   1457   2069   1574          2074   kWh
June      1268      0   1478   1368   1521   1585   1932          1666   kWh

Code: Select all

July      1448    595   1395   1406   1880   1823   1887          1902   kWh
August    1442   1347   1447   1333   1794   1887   1932          1875   kWh
September 1209    910   1295   1414   1577   1495   1551          1555   kWh
October   1304    931    981   1034   1258   1415   1593          1713   kWh
November   864    949   1041   1018   1227   1277   1340          1154   kWh
December   820    803    612    669    812    865   1002          1108   kWh
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Totals   13986   6362  14495  14068  15888  18067  18555    756  18330   kWh
Our system has produced 88.191 MWh from installation through the end of January 2017.

Net grid consumption since July 2011 (when PV was turned on permanently and a new electricity meter was installed) has been 14.3 MWh. Solar production during this period was 87.3 MWh meaning total consumption was 101.6 MWh. Solar has provided 85.9% of that total.

During the past 12-month period, production was 18,011 kWh and consumption was 18,184 kWh meaning our system was a net consumer of 173 kWh. Put another way, our system produced 99.0% of our consumption over this period, including driving the LEAF approximately 8500 miles.
RegGuheert
2011 Leaf SL Demo vehicle
2011 miles at purchase. 10K miles on Apr 14, 2013. 20K miles (55.7Ah) on Aug 7, 2014, 30K miles (52.0Ah) on Dec 30, 2015, 40K miles (49.8Ah) on Feb 8, 2017.
Enphase Inverter Measured MTBF: M190, M215, M250, S280

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RegGuheert
Posts: 5548
Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2012 4:12 am
Delivery Date: 16 Mar 2012
Leaf Number: 5926
Location: Northern VA

Re: Our solar production

Tue Feb 28, 2017 7:56 pm

February was fairly sunny and very warm here. Production was decent at 1241 kWh. That result is about 91% of the record of 1361 kWh set in February 2015.

The peak production day for February was on the 13th at 78.7 kWh. This falls short of the daily record for February of 82.4 kWh which was set on February 27, 2015.

Below are all our numbers for 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017 along with the PVWatts predictions for the old array (PVW42: good through June 2014) and the new array (PVW54: good starting with July 2014):

Code: Select all

Month    PVW42   2011   2012   2013   2014   2015   2016   2017  PVW54  Units
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
January    916    669    869    822    857   1006   1300    756   1229   kWh
February   702    158   1085    866   1054   1361   1192   1241    915   kWh
March      965      0   1350   1152   1113   1547   1498          1240   kWh
April     1465      0   1465   1495   1338   1737   1754          1899   kWh
May       1583      0   1477   1491   1457   2069   1574          2074   kWh
June      1268      0   1478   1368   1521   1585   1932          1666   kWh

Code: Select all

July      1448    595   1395   1406   1880   1823   1887          1902   kWh
August    1442   1347   1447   1333   1794   1887   1932          1875   kWh
September 1209    910   1295   1414   1577   1495   1551          1555   kWh
October   1304    931    981   1034   1258   1415   1593          1713   kWh
November   864    949   1041   1018   1227   1277   1340          1154   kWh
December   820    803    612    669    812    865   1002          1108   kWh
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Totals   13986   6362  14495  14068  15888  18067  18555   1997  18330   kWh
Our system has produced 89.432 MWh from installation through the end of February 2017.

Net grid consumption since July 2011 (when PV was turned on permanently and a new electricity meter was installed) has been 14.7 MWh. Solar production during this period was 88.6 MWh meaning total consumption was 103.3 MWh. Solar has provided 85.8% of that total.

During the past 12-month period, production was 18,060 kWh and consumption was 17,948 kWh meaning our system was a net producer of 112 kWh. Put another way, our system produced 100.6% of our consumption over this period, including driving the LEAF approximately 8500 miles.
RegGuheert
2011 Leaf SL Demo vehicle
2011 miles at purchase. 10K miles on Apr 14, 2013. 20K miles (55.7Ah) on Aug 7, 2014, 30K miles (52.0Ah) on Dec 30, 2015, 40K miles (49.8Ah) on Feb 8, 2017.
Enphase Inverter Measured MTBF: M190, M215, M250, S280

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dgpcolorado
Posts: 2955
Joined: Sat Aug 20, 2011 1:56 pm
Delivery Date: 15 Dec 2011
Location: The Western Slope, Colorado

Re: Our solar production

Sun Jul 09, 2017 11:47 am

June was noteworthy here for being even more sunny than usual. My production tied with May 2012 for second place, after June 2011, my best solar month ever.

My 2170 kW of panels produced 365 kWh of electricity last month. This time of the year my panels are at 15º pitch.

I finally washed the accumulated dirt off the panels a few days ago, given the lack of rain to do it. Much as I like having the solar production, I'm hoping for a wet monsoon season to reduce the fire danger in this piñon-juniper-oak forest.


It appears that utilities are being successful in many states in getting net metering killed:

Rooftop Solar Dims Under Pressure From Utility Lobbyists

I am fortunate that the little power co-op — 13,000 meters in four counties — which serves my house, is strongly supportive of renewables, reflecting the wishes of the members/owners.
Blue 2012 SV Dec 2011 to Feb 2016
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GRA
Posts: 7365
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Our solar production

Sun Jul 09, 2017 2:57 pm

dgpcolorado wrote:June was noteworthy here for being even more sunny than usual. My production tied with May 2012 for second place, after June 2011, my best solar month ever.

My 2170 kW of panels produced 365 kWh of electricity last month. This time of the year my panels are at 15º pitch.

I finally washed the accumulated dirt off the panels a few days ago, given the lack of rain to do it. Much as I like having the solar production, I'm hoping for a wet monsoon season to reduce the fire danger in this piñon-juniper-oak forest.

At least you're up higher, they're fairly spread out and most aren't very tall, so you've got a better shot - out here the greatest die off was in the mixed conifer belt (Ponderosa/Jeffrey/Sugar Pine/White Fir/Incense Cedar/Black Oak, lower than you): http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-sierra-dead-trees-20170128-story.html
Even though dead but standing trees pose a greater risk, the forest floor is cluttered with the trunks and branches when they fall, allowing fire to easily connect from tree to tree even if there wasn't all the brush. Last summer at my old Scout camp (5,760+ ft. on the western slope, in the Stanislaus N.F.), what used to be an easy stroll cross country through the forest at any time going back almost half a century, in the the past 5 years has turned into an obstacle course of dead and downed limbs, and it's like that all over the central and southern Sierra.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

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dgpcolorado
Posts: 2955
Joined: Sat Aug 20, 2011 1:56 pm
Delivery Date: 15 Dec 2011
Location: The Western Slope, Colorado

Re: Our solar production

Mon Jul 10, 2017 1:10 pm

GRA wrote:At least you're up higher, they're fairly spread out and most aren't very tall, so you've got a better shot - out here the greatest die off was in the mixed conifer belt (Ponderosa/Jeffrey/Sugar Pine/White Fir/Incense Cedar/Black Oak, lower than you): http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-sierra-dead-trees-20170128-story.html
Even though dead but standing trees pose a greater risk, the forest floor is cluttered with the trunks and branches when they fall, allowing fire to easily connect from tree to tree even if there wasn't all the brush. Last summer at my old Scout camp (5,760+ ft. on the western slope, in the Stanislaus N.F.), what used to be an easy stroll cross country through the forest at any time going back almost half a century, in the the past 5 years has turned into an obstacle course of dead and downed limbs, and it's like that all over the central and southern Sierra.
We have had quite a lot of beetle kill in the montane zone here, albeit not as extreme as the drought kill in much of the California mountains.

The trees on my lot weren't originally spread out. My piñon-juniper-oak forest was very dense on my lot when I built my house; in many places it was too dense to walk through. Counting rings on a couple of medium sized trees in 1999, I came to 100 for both, meaning that the forest on my lot hadn't burned in at least 100 years. I built a concrete and steel house to reduce the fire danger. However, it turns out that windows are a vulnerable point: a very hot fire will pop the windows and the fire will burn the house from the inside out. I have a lot of very large windows for the splendid mountain vistas, so that was a concern.

After seeing the effects of the Los Alamos fire in 2000 — where the piñon fueled fire was so hot that the baked ground became impermeable to water(!) — plus a drought year here circa 2001, I started thinning the forest around my house. Every winter — when the piñon Ips beetle is dormant — I remove some more trees to increase the spacing. [Unlike with well-spaced ponderosas, limbing-up piñons and junipers is useless since they are pretty much all crown and they burn so hot. Nevertheless I have neighbors who limb-up every tree — removing none — and think that they are doing fire mitigation, to my ire — it makes the forest look ridiculous and is utterly useless.]

Over the years I've removed hundreds of trees on my little five acre lot but still have hundreds left. I leave an acre and a half of my favorite old growth forest untouched — if it burns, so be it. From my botanist point of view, thinning the forest has several advantages: the trees that are left, as well as other plants — grasses, forbs and shrubs — get more sun and water, making them healthier; it will slow down the spread of a wildfire; it allows more snow to reach and melt into the ground, rather than evaporating directly from the trees, increasing soil moisture. The better-watered and healthier trees, in turn, are more resistant to beetle kill because trees with good sap pressure can force them out; beetles generally kill already stressed trees.

In addition to improving plant health and the number and variety of meadow plants in the clearings, thinning the forest improves habitat for some wildlife, such as deer (and the mountain lions that eat them), bears, bunnies and the like, but reduces habitat for other critters, such as tree squirrels, woodpeckers and nuthatches. It also reduces the pine nut crop that so many critters depend on (Clark's nutcrackers and piñon jays actually commute in from the mountains for pine nut season in a good year), although healthier piñons will individually produce more pine nuts IME. But fire mitigation is the goal. In a very dense forest, such as mine was, the idea is to remove 70-80% of the trees, which drastically reduces the forest fuel load. Nevertheless, I still have a LOT of trees, they are just farther apart and healthier.

If I pushed the forest far enough back I could be pretty much fire-safe. But I have some 25+ foot piñons near a corner of my house that I haven't been able to bring myself to cut. I put my house where I did in part so I wouldn't have to cut those big and beautiful trees for the views. If I did take out those trees I'm pretty sure my house would survive a wildfire, despite piñon fires being so ferociously hot due to the pitch in them.

Keeps me busy in retirement!
Blue 2012 SV Dec 2011 to Feb 2016
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DuncanCunningham
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Joined: Thu Mar 26, 2015 10:02 am
Delivery Date: 15 Apr 2015
Location: Bountiful, UT

Re: Our solar production

Mon Jul 10, 2017 3:15 pm

i'm new to this solar thing. I got a ground mount system. 24 panels. 12 inverters.

Image

Image

Image

today was cloudy.. so it looks like this at the moment.
Image

Maximum for a day collection (only been up since 23rd June 2017) has been just under 50kWh, seems that everyday so far has been above 40kWh but today might be a sign of things to come with clouds.
Statler: Wake up you old fool. You slept through the show.
Waldorf: Who's a fool? You watched it.

2015 Leaf S (leased until May 2018, Bought out in Jan 2017)
2012 Leaf SL (purchased May 2015)

GRA
Posts: 7365
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Our solar production

Mon Jul 10, 2017 3:37 pm

dgpcolorado wrote:The trees on my lot weren't originally spread out. <snip details>

Thanks for the explanation, and I'm glad to see you're well aware of the ecosystem effects. I've taken various field classes on the ecology of the Sierra, Great Basin and Front Range over the years and have read a fair amount, but I'm just an interested layperson. As such, it's almost heartbreaking to see the extent of dead stands of pines anywhere you go in the mixed conifer belt. While I prefer to do my most of my outdoor recreating in the sub-alpine and alpine zones, I have to drive through the mixed conifer forest to get there, and the sight of expanses of dead trees in every direction is sobering, areas I know really well more so. Anyway, I think we've gone way OT, so my apologies to all for taking us there.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

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