philip
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Delivery Date: 25 Aug 2015
Leaf Number: 327341
Location: El Cajon, CA

Re: SDGE TOU vs Tier Pricing

Thu Jul 11, 2019 1:25 pm

SageBrush wrote:0.3*365*10 = $1100 per kWh of battery


Is the 10 an assumed 10 year battery life? Are storage manufacturers guaranteeing that with daily cycling? Will a 1kWh battery new still be a 1kWh battery in 10 years?

The TOU spread in San Diego isn't that high for 7 months of the year, it's only a couple cents on most TOU plans, and .17 on EV-TOU-5. The 5 summer months get you .29 on the EV-TOU-2 and .44 on EV-TOU-5.

In any case, there are likely some interconnect rules that will disallow this sort of thing, this is California after all where posting on a forum is known to cause cancer....
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SageBrush
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Delivery Date: 13 Feb 2017
Location: Colorado

Re: SDGE TOU vs Tier Pricing

Thu Jul 11, 2019 1:33 pm

philip wrote:
SageBrush wrote:0.3*365*10 = $1100 per kWh of battery


Is the 10 an assumed 10 year battery life?.

Yes.

I'd presume some degradation that is not covered by warranty, but then again the battery does not self-destruct on its 10th anniversary. 10 years of full use is a conservative estimate. The smart move would probably be to hedge the battery by charging to 95% of allowable SoC daily. That type of behavior in a Tesla car leads to remarkably little degradation over time.
2013 LEAF 'S' Model with QC & rear-view camera
Bought off-lease Jan 2017 from N. California
Car is now enjoying an easy life in Colorado
03/2018: 58 Ahr, 28k miles
11/2018: 56.16 Ahr, 30k miles
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davewill
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Location: San Diego, CA, US

Re: SDGE TOU vs Tier Pricing

Thu Jul 11, 2019 5:12 pm

LeafPowerIsIxE wrote:As far as the EV-TOU5 rate plan, is this valid for my entire house? I have 2 meters in my home, one for the EV and the other for the residential power. Can I put my entire house on the EV-TOU5 plan? In my case, this would be cost effective at 9 cents per KWH.

Yes. EV-TOU5 is a one meter plan. I delay my dishwasher (and both EVs obviously) until after midnight, and do all the laundry on weekend mornings to take advantage.

The one thing that stumps me is the spa pump. If I run it at night, then the solar heating doesn't work, so I have to run it during the day. At least I have can have it finish before peak time starts.
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Randy
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Leaf Number: 0191
Location: San Diego, CA

Re: SDGE TOU vs Tier Pricing

Thu Jul 11, 2019 8:23 pm

johnlocke wrote:I don't know your specifics but when I installed in 2011 the grandfathering rule was for 20 years not 5. I can change voluntarily to another rate plan but if I do that I might not be able to revert back afterwards. In the meantime, SDG&E can't force me to change rates. Standard TOU rates would save me $50 a year if I believed SDG&E rate calculator. Every other rate structure would cost me significantly more than my current plan. Last year I actually ended up with a credit balance after the EV Credit, climate credit, and Reduce Your Use credits. I'm pretty sure that TOU rates won't benefit me in any meaningful way. I doubt that anyone really reduces their costs under TOU.


Just saw this, john.

To clarify, there are two different grandfathering periods at play with solar systems.

The first one is 20 years of guaranteed NEM participation when you first install solar. You won't lose that privilege for 20 years. This has nothing to do with pricing, just your ability to export excess energy.

The second grandfathering period is for 5 years, and that starts when your system is installed. This grandfathering lets you keep the legacy TOU periods (noon to 6pm peak time). In fact, the grandfathered version of the EV-TOU2 rate is called GEV-TOU2, and you might see that on your bill. After your 5 years is up, then you are moved to the non-grandfathered version of the rate with the new TOU periods (EV-TOU2).

Neither one of these grandfathering periods has anything to do with price...I hope that helps to clarify things....

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