LeftieBiker
Posts: 9384
Joined: Wed May 22, 2013 3:17 am
Delivery Date: 31 May 2013
Location: Upstate New York, US

Re: 2018 LEAF Drive Review

Tue Jan 30, 2018 5:11 pm

E-Pedal is good for urban driving, but on the highway it will waste energy. That's why I'm asking how much regen there is in the D and D-Eco modes with e-Pedal off.
Scarlet Ember 2018 Leaf SL W/ Pro Pilot
2009 Vectrix VX-1 W/18 Leaf modules, & 3 EZIP E-bicycles.
PLEASE don't PM me with Leaf questions. Just post in the topic that seems most appropriate.

GRA
Posts: 9243
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: 2018 LEAF Drive Review

Tue Jan 30, 2018 6:02 pm

LeftieBiker wrote:How does the regen level compare to the current Leaf in D and in Eco?

Can't say how it compares to the old LEAF, but the regen level is -0.20g in "E-pedal" per MT's comparo with the Bolt and Model 3: http://www.motortrend.com/cars/tesla/model-3/2017/the-automobile-2-0-chevrolet-bolt-ev-premier-vs-nissan-leaf-sl-vs-tesla-model-3-long-range/
The Bolt's slightly stronger in 'Low' (-0.21g), -0.26g 'Low + paddle', and -0.19g in 'Drive'. The Model 3 has considerably less decel, -0.09g in 'low regen,' -0.16g in 'high regen'.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

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RegGuheert
Posts: 6319
Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2012 4:12 am
Delivery Date: 16 Mar 2012
Leaf Number: 5926
Location: Northern VA

Re: 2018 LEAF Drive Review

Tue Jan 30, 2018 7:31 pm

GRA wrote:
LeftieBiker wrote:How does the regen level compare to the current Leaf in D and in Eco?
Can't say how it compares to the old LEAF, but the regen level is -0.20g in "E-pedal" per MT's comparo with the Bolt and Model 3: http://www.motortrend.com/cars/tesla/model-3/2017/the-automobile-2-0-chevrolet-bolt-ev-premier-vs-nissan-leaf-sl-vs-tesla-model-3-long-range/
The Bolt's slightly stronger in 'Low' (-0.21g), -0.26g 'Low + paddle', and -0.19g in 'Drive'. The Model 3 has considerably less decel, -0.09g in 'low regen,' -0.16g in 'high regen'.
Is there any way to know how much of the E-pedal deceleration is coming from regen versus friction braking? Also, I wonder how much of the regen in a new LEAF 2 will go away as the battery degrades. Will it all go away eventually?
RegGuheert
2011 Leaf SL Demo vehicle
10K mi. on 041413; 20K mi. (55.7Ah) on 080714; 30K mi. (52.0Ah) on 123015; 40K mi. (49.8Ah) on 020817; 50K mi. (47.2Ah) on 120717; 60K mi. (43.66Ah) on 091918.
Enphase Inverter Measured MTBF: M190, M215, M250, S280

DaveinOlyWA
Posts: 13212
Joined: Sat Apr 24, 2010 7:43 pm
Delivery Date: 16 Feb 2018
Leaf Number: 314199
Location: Olympia, WA
Contact: Website

Re: 2018 LEAF Drive Review

Wed Jan 31, 2018 8:16 am

RegGuheert wrote:
GRA wrote:
LeftieBiker wrote:How does the regen level compare to the current Leaf in D and in Eco?
Can't say how it compares to the old LEAF, but the regen level is -0.20g in "E-pedal" per MT's comparo with the Bolt and Model 3: http://www.motortrend.com/cars/tesla/model-3/2017/the-automobile-2-0-chevrolet-bolt-ev-premier-vs-nissan-leaf-sl-vs-tesla-model-3-long-range/
The Bolt's slightly stronger in 'Low' (-0.21g), -0.26g 'Low + paddle', and -0.19g in 'Drive'. The Model 3 has considerably less decel, -0.09g in 'low regen,' -0.16g in 'high regen'.
Is there any way to know how much of the E-pedal deceleration is coming from regen versus friction braking? Also, I wonder how much of the regen in a new LEAF 2 will go away as the battery degrades. Will it all go away eventually?



LEAF Spy should give us that info although its not all that certain that LEAF Spy will be available on the 2018. I reported that Nissan had taken steps to lock down the CAN BUS based on failures from another model when plugging in OBD devices by my local LEAF Tech last Summer.

But others stated that what LEAF Spy did was not as invasive and it would still work and Jim did post a shot of of a 2018 he plugged into so hoping LEAF Spy continues!


As far as long term degradation? That is anyone's guess. IMM, there never was a reason for it to go away under any level of degradation so I doubt its a physical barrier; simply a SW misstep.
2011 SL; 44,598 miles. 2013 S; 44,840 miles.2016 S30 deceased. 29,413 miles. 2018 S40; 11,987 miles, 485 GIDs, 37.6 kwh 110.89 Ahr , SOH 96.00, Hx 115.22
My Blog; http://daveinolywa.blogspot.com" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

simply
Posts: 16
Joined: Wed Feb 07, 2018 5:08 pm
Delivery Date: 07 Feb 2018
Leaf Number: 301514

Re: 2018 LEAF Drive Review

Thu Feb 15, 2018 9:35 am

--- CAVEAT ---
I really enjoy the new 2018 leaf and I am a loyal Nissan Leaf driver, I also really enjoy the tech of Tesla's autopilot and was hoping to see a few of the features mentioned below included in the ProPilot.

I took delivery of a blue 2018 SL leaf February 7th in Northern Virginia. I have only driven leafs as my daily car since May 2013.

ProPilot:

I have used Turo to rent three different Teslas to drive from DC to New Jersey. I am a huge fan of Tesla's auto pilot. A few point have come to mind in the 300 ish miles i have driven so far with the ProPilot in my vehicle.

ProPilot does not pick up turn lanes that it comes upon. For instance if you are driving on a highway at 65 miles an hour and you come up on a right hand or left hand turn lane the auto steering turns off because it isn't able to sense the the solid line just switched to dotted. The auto steering will turn back on once you are back to solid lines.

ProPilot does not change lanes! This sounds ridiculous to some but I really really enjoy Tesla's lane changing ability and it's ability to re-find the lane markers. When I turn on my turn signal to change lanes with ProPilot that auto steering turns off.

The adaptive cruise turns off in stop and go traffic. I am having to preemptively press the "RES" button to have the adaptive cruise start again. I sat in an hour of stop and go with the Tesla on route 78 once and never had to re-engage the autopilot
All Lease Leafs
2013-2015 White Pearl SL - 18,000miles/year - $377 per month $0 down
2015-2018 Blue S - 12,000miles/year - $255 per month $0 down
2018 Blue SL - 15,000miles/year - $533 per month $0 down
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TheLostPetrol
Posts: 47
Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2017 8:19 am
Delivery Date: 21 Feb 2018
Leaf Number: 307105
Location: Greater Chicagoland

Re: 2018 LEAF Drive Review

Thu Feb 15, 2018 5:24 pm

simply wrote:I took delivery of a blue 2018 SL leaf February 7th in Northern Virginia. I have only driven leafs as my daily car since May 2013.

ProPilot:
...
The adaptive cruise turns off in stop and go traffic. I am having to preemptively press the "RES" button to have the adaptive cruise start again. I sat in an hour of stop and go with the Tesla on route 78 once and never had to re-engage the autopilot

In comparison, I find I appreciate the Prius Prime's adaptive cruise control most in stop-and-go traffic. It will "adapt" all the way down to something like 1 MPH. If it comes to a complete stop, you do have to manually intervene by tapping the throttle when you want to resume moving.
2017-12-16 New Prius Prime
2018-02-21 Used 2015 LEAF SV Mfd 2014-07 In-service 2015-02-27
Date mi AHr SOH Hx QC L1/L2
2018-02-21 26,938 60.22 96.98% 90.73% 1 988
2018-07-01 31,601 58.05 93.48% 87.03% 11 1223
2018-10-01 35,428 55.63 89.58% 82.13% 16 1440

DaveinOlyWA
Posts: 13212
Joined: Sat Apr 24, 2010 7:43 pm
Delivery Date: 16 Feb 2018
Leaf Number: 314199
Location: Olympia, WA
Contact: Website

Re: 2018 LEAF Drive Review

Thu Feb 15, 2018 5:29 pm

TheLostPetrol wrote:
simply wrote:I took delivery of a blue 2018 SL leaf February 7th in Northern Virginia. I have only driven leafs as my daily car since May 2013.

ProPilot:
...
The adaptive cruise turns off in stop and go traffic. I am having to preemptively press the "RES" button to have the adaptive cruise start again. I sat in an hour of stop and go with the Tesla on route 78 once and never had to re-engage the autopilot

In comparison, I find I appreciate the Prius Prime's adaptive cruise control most in stop-and-go traffic. It will "adapt" all the way down to something like 1 MPH. If it comes to a complete stop, you do have to manually intervene by tapping the throttle when you want to resume moving.


LEAF is same way. It will come to a stop and resume set following distance but it times out after 5 seconds or so and needs to be "tapped" to get going again.
2011 SL; 44,598 miles. 2013 S; 44,840 miles.2016 S30 deceased. 29,413 miles. 2018 S40; 11,987 miles, 485 GIDs, 37.6 kwh 110.89 Ahr , SOH 96.00, Hx 115.22
My Blog; http://daveinolywa.blogspot.com" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

GRA
Posts: 9243
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: 2018 LEAF Drive Review

Mon Feb 26, 2018 5:23 pm

Via GCR:
2018 Nissan Leaf electric car: four-day winter road-trip review
https://www.greencarreports.com/news/1115391_2018-nissan-leaf-electric-car-four-day-winter-road-trip-review

. . . We spent four days with a 2018 Leaf SL, the top-of-the-line version, and put 442 miles on the car. Our travels included not only our usual New York City-to-Catskill Mountains round trip, but also a road trip from NYC to Philadelphia and back.

Higher speeds cut into rated range, and to add to the challenges, we tested the car in February in the Northeast, with average temperatures of 40 to 45 degrees F. In other words, we didn't baby the car, but drove it the way we'd expect to drive any other car.

On our first highway leg, at night and starting with an indicated 99 percent of range—or 165 miles in Eco mode—we chewed up 108 miles of range covering just 66 miles at highway speeds around 70 mph, with one seat heater on, and only intermittent use of cabin heat.

That led to a relatively speedy decision to fast-charge the car every 60 to 80 miles as convenient, so as not to induce anxiety.

We expected to do so four times, once each up and back to the mountains and again to and from Philadelphia. A frustratingly defective fast-charging site, however, ended up requiring a fifth stop. . . .

Our fast-charging (all done at dual-standard stations) was split between Greenlots, which operates the fast-charging stations at rest stops on Interstate 87 between New York and Albany, and EVgo, which runs those at New Jersey Turnpike travel plazas.

Greenlots was fine in two out of three tries, delivering 17.7 kilowatt-hours in 33 minutes and 20.2 kwh in 42 minutes at the working stations.
The site at the Ulster Travel Plaza, however, gave us only 11.6 kwh in 53 minutes, not enough to complete our trip. Thus far, we've received nothing more than an auto-response to our complaint to Greenlots about what is clearly a defective station.

The two EVgo sites in New Jersey offered pair of stations apiece, adjacent to several Tesla Supercharger stations, and had the added benefit of not being located next to Dumpsters as the Greenlots stations on the New York State Thruway tended to be.

The EVgo fast-charging was free, through a card provided to new Leaf buyers. The Greenlots stations required an account with the company, though that was easy to set up via mobile phone, and the company's app can be used to start a charging session thereafter. . . .

Our level of charge varied from 99 percent to a low of 21 percent (with an indicated 32 miles left), and overall efficiency was decent if not stellar.
According to the Leaf's trip computer, our total of 442 miles were covered at an energy-usage rate of 3.4 miles per kwh. That's lower than the 4.0 miles per kwh we achieved in a 2017 Chevrolet Bolt EV, but that car was tested in temperate California without need for seat heaters or cabin heat.

Moreover, the Bolt's battery didn't have to cope with temperatures and cold soaks near freezing. . . .

    The "e-Pedal" that allows one-pedal driving works superbly, and may be the most predictable among the BMW i3, Chevy Bolt EV, and Tesla Model 3. However, we had to learn to turn it on every time we powered up the car, because—unlike the Eco setting—it's not retained by the car when you turn it off. Very annoying.

    The Eco setting is a tad sluggish but not nearly as grim and frustrating as on some other cars; it appeared to add 6 to 8 percent to the indicated range

    The 2018 Leaf has enough power that it's almost perky in Normal setting, and only somewhat slow in Eco, though it's still no Bolt EV

    The heated seats take a long time to power up, and aren't really sufficient after a cold start, and the steering-wheel heater is anemic at best
    The heat pump that powers cabin heat, however, had less effect on range than anticipated (a decrease of just 5 to 9 miles when we turned it on) and we found that 10 minutes or less was enough to warm the car acceptably, at least in front. . . .
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

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