GRA
Posts: 8367
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Hydrogen and FCEVs discussion thread

Wed May 16, 2018 5:28 pm

As a matter of general info, via GCC:
DOE: 10 million metric tons of hydrogen produced annually in the US; 68% for petroleum processing
http://www.greencarcongress.com/2018/05/20180516-doeh2.html

. . . About 21% of the hydrogen is used in the production of fertilizer. Most of the hydrogen produced in the United States comes from steam methane reforming.

There are currently 1,600 miles of hydrogen pipeline in the United States and there are large hydrogen production facilities in almost every state.

There's a map showing production facilities by daily output.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 8367
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Hydrogen and FCEVs discussion thread

Fri May 18, 2018 3:28 pm

Via GCC:
SoCalGas introduces STARS solar hydrogen generation system at California Air Resources Board Symposium
http://www.greencarcongress.com/2018/05/20181518-stars.html

. . . The project is a partnership between SoCalGas, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the STARS Corporation. The generation system uses sunlight to convert natural gas and water into hydrogen and capture the carbon dioxide (CO2) to prevent carbon emissions.

A separate SoCalGas research and development project is studying the production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from carbon captured during hydrogen production. (Earlier post.)

Developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) (earlier post), the Solar Thermochemical Advanced Reactor System (STARS) produces hydrogen through a thermochemical process in which the sun provides thermal energy to break down natural gas and water into hydrogen and carbon dioxide in a steam methane reforming process.

The STARS technology is based on micro- and meso-channel processing technologies (MMPT) that have been demonstrated on a variety of different reactors and heat exchangers for intensifying processing applications. Using MMPT arrangements there are multiple applications under consideration for STARS, including the production of syngas, hydrogen, and methanol, using steam-methane reforming and dry reforming approaches.

Results from extensive testing show STARS can be configured to produce hydrogen and other chemicals without any carbon emissions reaching the atmosphere. These chemicals trap and use the carbon that would otherwise be emitted. The carbon then can be used to make chemicals that become resins and plastic materials.

STARS converts a record-setting 70% of solar energy into chemical energy. . . .

STARS Corporation hopes to have a commercial demonstration operating in one to two years.

This technology is undergoing field testing at San Diego State University’s Brawley campus where it runs on solar and renewable electricity. Currently the system produces about 25 kg of hydrogen per day if operated around the clock using a combination of solar energy and renewable gas or electricity. This is the equivalent of 25 gallons of gasoline or diesel fuel. Research suggests the system could produce 100 kg of hydrogen per day with a more advanced design. . . .
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 8367
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Hydrogen and FCEVs discussion thread

Sat May 19, 2018 4:29 pm

Via GCC:
DOE SBIR/STTR FY18 BES Phase 1 Release 1 awards include 15 for hydrogen and fuel cells
http://www.greencarcongress.com/2018/05/20180519-sbir.html

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has announced the 2018 Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Phase I Release 1 awards, including 15 projects focused on high density hydrogen storage, innovative ionomers (ion-containing polymers) in the catalyst layer, gas diffusion layers, and membranes for electrochemical production of hydrogen. These projects are awarded through the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES). Award winners include:

High Density Hydrogen Storage

    NuMat Technologies: High-Density Hydrogen Storage in Space-Filling Polyhedral Sorbents. The proposed program will develop and demonstrate a new technology for effectively consolidating porous sorbent materials; thus, enabling the high-density storage of onboard hydrogen and bringing the US into the forefront of the global fuel-cell powered vehicle market.

    Nextgen Battery Technologies: High-Density Hydrogen Storage in Space-Filling Polyhedral Sorbents. The proposed program will develop and demonstrate a new technology for effectively consolidating porous sorbent materials; thus, enabling the high-density storage of onboard hydrogen and bringing the US into the forefront of the global fuel-cell powered vehicle market.

    E&G Associates, Inc.: Development of Novel Compaction Regimes for Hydrogen Storage Materials. Current technology for hydrogen storage requires high pressure systems which are too large and costly to be viable for transportation. This Phase I SBIR project’s objective is to develop a compact material based solution, which allows high volume hydrogen storage in a small footprint, making hydrogen powered vehicles more feasible. . . .

Membranes

    Giner, Inc.: Innovative Bilayer Microporous Layer for PEM Fuel Cells. The broad commercialization of fuel cell vehicles requires further cost reduction of the system. One of the approaches is to enhance the fuel cell power density for a given system size, which requires unhindered mass transport at high current operations. The gas diffusion media is a critical component to address the water and mass transport issue. This proposed bilayer microporous layer-based gas diffusion media design with combined pore size gradient and hydrophilic/hydrophobic gradient would enable to achieve these goals.

    Xergy, Inc.: Novel membranes for Electrochemical Hydrogen Compression enabling increased pressure capability and higher pumping efficiency. As part of the infrastructure development for widespread hydrogen utilization, robust low-cost hydrogen compression is required. Xergy/RPI is developing membranes for hydrogen compression to high pressure to address this need. This adaptable membrane chemistry has utility in compression and occupancy sensors which will have a large impact on energy demand.

    Sustainable Innovations: Novel Sulfonated Block Copolymers for Efficient Electrochemical Hydrogen Compression. Sustainable Innovations Inc. (SI), and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) are teaming to evaluate new ionic polymer membranes developed at RPI in SI’s electrochemical hydrogen separation and compression systems with the commercial goal of reducing the cost of hydrogen for industrial and fueling customers. Gaia Energy Research Institute will provide techno-economic analysis of the new membrane manufacturing costs.

The article also lists the awardees in the other two areas.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

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