GRA
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Re: Hydrogen and FCEVs discussion thread

Thu Mar 30, 2017 4:03 pm

Via GCC:
ClassNK releases guidelines for liquefied hydrogen carriers
http://www.greencarcongress.com/2017/03 ... assnk.html

. . . Realizing the practical use of hydrogen, will require economically viable and environmentally friendly production as a secure supply chain to transport hydrogen to the place of consumption. As the most efficient way for long distance and large volume transportation, carriage of LH2 by a ship is anticipated to expand.

Currently, the International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk (IGC Code) outlines safety requirements for gas carriers such as LNG. However, there are no specific requirements defined in the code applicable for LH2 carriers that take into account the hazards associated with the handling and transport of LH2. . . .

ClassNK has developed its Guidelines for Liquid Hydrogen Carriers which provide safety requirements for the design and construction of LH2 carriers. The guidelines consist of safety requirements applicable to LH2 carriers based on the IMO Interim Recommendations, various international standards as well as additional requirements taking specific hazards arising from the handling of LH2 into consideration.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 6970
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Re: Hydrogen and FCEVs discussion thread

Fri Mar 31, 2017 1:38 pm

Both Via GCC:
SoCalGas & UC Irvine show power-to-gas technology able to boost use of intermittent renewable energy significantly
http://www.greencarcongress.com/2017/03 ... 1-p2g.html

Southern California Gas Co. (SoCalGas) announced that new research on power-to-gas technology shows the technique holds the ability to significantly increase the use of intermittent renewable energy. The finding came out of ongoing research conducted at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) and funded by SoCalGas.

Preliminary research findings, announced this week at UCI’s International Colloquium on Environmentally Preferred Advanced Generation (ICEPAG), demonstrated that the campus microgrid could increase the portion of renewable energy it uses from 3.5% to 35% by implementing a power-to-gas strategy.

    The ability to increase the mix of renewables on campus by tenfold is truly significant. With power-to-gas technology, you don’t need to stop renewable power generation when demand is low. Instead, the excess electricity can be used to make hydrogen that can be integrated into existing natural gas pipeline infrastructure and stored for later use. The Southern California Gas Company system alone is made up of over 100,000 miles of pipeline. This study suggests that we could leverage that installed infrastructure for storage and significantly increase the amount of renewable power generation deployed in California.

    —Jack Brouwer, associate professor of mechanical & aerospace engineering and civil & environmental engineering at UCI and associate director of the Advanced Power & Energy Program (APEP) . . . .

A 5% blend of hydrogen in SoCalGas’ natural gas system would provide storage capacity equivalent to $130 billion worth of battery systems if purchased at the US Department of Energy future cost of $200 per kilowatt hour. Renewable hydrogen can also be used in hydrogen fuel cell vehicles or converted to methane for use in a natural gas pipeline and storage system. . . .

The study used data from the UCI campus microgrid, which includes solar panels that produce about 4 megawatts of peak power. Simulations showed that by storing excess solar power on sunny days and using an electrolyzer to produce renewable hydrogen, the microgrid could support an additional 30 megawatts of solar panels. The increased solar deployment raised the fraction of renewable power used on campus from 3.5% to 35%.


HYREADY collaboration supports introduction of power-to-gas H2 into natural gas infrastructure
http://www.greencarcongress.com/2017/03 ... ready.html

The HYREADY joint industry project (JIP), led by DNV GL, intends to encourage the industry to “Be ready for Hydrogen” by developing practical processes and procedures for the introduction of hydrogen to the grid. HYREADY focuses on the consequences of H2 added to natural gas in an existing specific network and on feasible countermeasures to mitigate these consequences.

The intermittent nature of renewable sources such as wind and solar demands large-scale temporal energy storage to balance electricity demand and production. The huge capacity of the existing natural gas grid could play an important role in this balancing, and could also offer additional energy transmission capacity.

Several studies have been carried out on the impact of hydrogen added to natural gas on public safety aspects, the integrity of materials used in the natural gas delivery chain and the performance of end-use equipment. However, concrete engineering guidelines for transmission and distribution system operators on how to prepare their systems for a specific percentage of hydrogen are lacking.

    There is a great deal of industry interest in the maximum percentage of hydrogen that can be added to natural gas. To successfully introduce hydrogen into natural gas grids, the impact and acceptability need to be assessed to evaluate amongst other things, public safety, system integrity, integrity management and energy transport capacity. HYREADY will develop industry guidelines addressing the ‘how-to’ questions for gas system operators so they can be confident both in preparing their natural gas grids for the accommodation of hydrogen and in assessing and managing the effects and possible consequences related to hydrogen injection.

    —Onno Florisson, Principal Consultant and DNV GL project manager
. . . .
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

sparky
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Re: Hydrogen and FCEVs discussion thread

Mon Apr 03, 2017 9:43 am

Daimler Steps Back From Fuel-Cell Car Development
http://fortune.com/2017/04/02/daimler-fuel-cell-car-development/

Daimler AG head Dieter Zetsche said at an automotive summit in Germany this week that hydrogen fuel cells are no longer a major part of the automaker’s plans for the future. ...

...Daimler’s move (perhaps more than Musk’s less-than-objective rhetoric), undermines Toyota’s emphasis on fuel-cell cars in recent years. Toyota's initiative is part of a broader Japanese government plan to create a “hydrogen economy,” but as of February Toyota had only sold 2,840 of its Mirai fuel-cell vehicles worldwide.

GRA
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Re: Hydrogen and FCEVs discussion thread

Mon Apr 03, 2017 3:47 pm

Via GCR, albeit nothing terribly new:
All the challenges for hydrogen fuel-cell cars laid out
http://www.greencarreports.com/news/110 ... s-laid-out

. . . In Japan, an energy group named Iwatani is beginning to build a network of refueling stations, but the process is time-consuming and expensive. Japanese regulations classify hydrogen as an industrial gas, so the refueling stations need to comply with strict safety regulations. Iwatani consequently spends about 500 million Japanese yen (roughly $4.5 million) to build each station, according to the Financial Times (subscription required), which is more than twice the cost of an equivalent site in the United States. . . .


Direct link to the original Financial Times article on which the GCR one is based: https://www.ft.com/content/328df346-10cb-11e7-a88c-50ba212dce4d
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

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TonyWilliams
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Re: Hydrogen and FCEVs discussion thread

Tue Apr 04, 2017 11:41 am

BOOM... large German auto manufacturer drops the hydrogen game:

http://insideevs.com/daimler-to-says-go ... -vehicles/

I'm sure somebody will 'splain us why Daimler / Mercedes Benz is wrong.

GRA
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Re: Hydrogen and FCEVs discussion thread

Tue Apr 04, 2017 3:46 pm

Tony, sparky already covered that two posts up (and beat me to it).
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 6970
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
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Re: Hydrogen and FCEVs discussion thread

Fri Apr 07, 2017 4:15 pm

Via GCC:
Ballard closes transaction with Broad-Ocean for fuel-cell system manufacture & sales in China
http://www.greencarcongress.com/2017/04 ... llard.html

Ballard Power Systems closed the transaction announced in February 2017 relating to technology transfer, licensing and supply arrangements with strategic partner Zhongshan Broad-Ocean Motor Co., Ltd. for the assembly and sale of FCveloCity 30-kilowatt (kW) and 85kW fuel cell systems in China.

In each of the three assembly operation locations, Broad-Ocean plans to engage with local governments as well as with bus and commercial vehicle OEMs for deployment of fuel cell buses and commercial vehicles incorporating Ballard-designed modules manufactured by Broad-Ocean. . . .


Government of Canada awarding $1.625 million for two public hydrogen stations in Toronto
http://www.greencarcongress.com/2017/04 ... adah2.html

. . . Budget 2016 allocated $16.4 million for the deployment of electric vehicle recharging and alternative fuel refueling infrastructure. Once successfully completed, the projects under this funding will establish more than 80 new charging units for electric vehicles, as well as nine natural gas and three hydrogen refueling stations along key transportation corridors.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
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Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
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Re: Hydrogen and FCEVs discussion thread

Sat Apr 08, 2017 2:16 pm

Via IEVS:
Hyundai Hydrogen Fuel Cell SUV Will Have 500 Miles Of Range
http://insideevs.com/hyundai-hydrogen-f ... les-range/
This has previously been mentioned in the thread, and we should undoubtedly multiply that by say .7 to reflect real world U.S. results. There is some further info:

. . . But Hyundai not only wants to lead in range, but also infrastructure. “We want to lead the changes in terms of technology,” said Kim Sae-hoon, who oversees fuel-cell technology at Hyundai. “When there is industrial restructuring and emergence of new technologies, it gives a new opportunity to us.” In total, Hyundai sold just 242 ix35 fuel-cell vehicles last year compared to Toyota’s 2,050 Mirais sold, 1,000 of which were in Japan.

Already the South Korean government has announced a goal of putting more than 10,000 FCVs on the road, exporting 14,000 units, and installing more than 100 charging stations by 2020. A so-called “Hydrogen Council” set up earlier in the year hopes to put those plans in to place with a more than $10 billion investment.

We'll see how much of this actually happens. I'm sure they'll get the cars and buses out in time for the Olympics, but the rest strikes me as being a lot more questionable.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 6970
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Hydrogen and FCEVs discussion thread

Thu Apr 13, 2017 4:30 pm

Via GCC:
NREL sets new world efficiency record for solar hydrogen production: 16.2%
http://www.greencarcongress.com/2017/04 ... -nrel.html

Scientists at the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recaptured the record for highest efficiency in solar hydrogen production via a photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-splitting process.

The new solar-to-hydrogen (STH) efficiency record is 16.2%, topping a reported 14% efficiency in 2015 by an international team made up of researchers from Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, TU Ilmenau, Fraunhofer ISE and the California Institute of Technology. A paper in Nature Energy outlines how NREL’s new record was achieved. . . .

Other methods that use sunlight entail additional loss-generating steps. For example: Electricity generated by commercial solar cells can be sent through power conversion systems to an electrolyzer to decompose water into hydrogen and oxygen at an approximate STH efficiency of 12%. Turner’s direct method set a long-unmatched STH efficiency record of 12.4%, which has been surpassed by NREL’s new PEC cell.

Before the PEC technology can be commercially viable, the cost of hydrogen production needs to come down to meet DOE’s target of less than $2 per kilogram of hydrogen. Continued improvements in cell efficiency and lifetime are needed to meet this target. Further enhanced efficiency would increase the hydrogen production rate per unit area, which decreases hydrogen cost by reducing balance-of-system expenditures.

In conjunction with efficiency improvements, durability of the current cell configuration needs to be significantly extended beyond its several hours of operational life to dramatically bring down costs. NREL researchers are actively pursuing methods of increasing the lifespan of the PEC device in addition to further efficiency gains. . . .
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 6970
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Hydrogen and FCEVs discussion thread

Fri Apr 14, 2017 2:03 pm

Via IEVS:
BMW Launching Low Volume FCEV In 2021
http://insideevs.com/bmw-launching-low- ... fcev-2021/

. . . BMW CEO Harald Krueger didn’t offer specific details about the project, according to BMW Blog, but he said it would be for “larger model series and long distances. . . ."

“However, until 2025 at least costs will remain too high and the hydrogen infrastructure too sparse to allow broad-based market penetration,” BMW development boss Klaus Fröhlich recently said, according to BMW Blog. “By the time the fundamentals are in place, the BMW Group will also have marketable products ready that are attractive to customers. . . .”
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

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