GRA
Posts: 9215
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: CA. retail H2 fuel stations

Fri May 25, 2018 4:23 pm

The Newport Beach station has been converted to full retail (i.e. the dispensers now accept debit/credit cards) and is now open, #35 (#23 in SoCal). Per the station website and presumably owing to this being one of the early dem/val stations with older tech,
This is a limited performance station. Refueling time will be longer and your range may be less than normal especially after heavy station use. Both dispensers are now operational for H70.
https://m.cafcp.org/content/newport-beach
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 9215
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: California retail H2 fuel stations

Wed Aug 01, 2018 7:39 pm

CARB has now released the
2018 Annual Evaluation of Fuel Cell
Electric Vehicle Deployment &
Hydrogen Fuel Station Network
Development
https://www.arb.ca.gov/msprog/zevprog/ab8/ab8_report_2018_print.pdf?utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery

I'll post highlights after I've read it.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 9215
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: California retail H2 fuel stations

Thu Aug 02, 2018 5:51 pm

Findings from the Executive summary of CARB's 2018 H2/FCEV report @ https://www.arb.ca.gov/msprog/zevprog/ab8/ab8_report_2018_print.pdf?utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery

You'll have to read the report itself for all the details behind the findings.

Finding 1: California’s hydrogen fueling network has continued to mature with growth in the number
of stations, continued emphasis on a fully retail customer experience, and private investment in
station development.

Finding 2: Station development progress in the past year has remained almost completely on-schedule
compared to projections provided a year ago.

Finding 3: Auto manufacturer projections for future FCEV deployments have recovered substantially
from 2017 projections.

Finding 4: CHIT-based analyses provide recommendations for State co-funded hydrogen station location
priorities in markets across California that help meet the 2025 goals of Executive Order B-48-18. These
locations additionally ensure the developing network meets coverage and capacity needs to enable the
2030 goals expressed by the California Fuel Cell Partnership.

Finding 5: Scenario analysis through CHIT demonstrates that a path towards the EO goal of 200 stations
and the CaFCP goal of 1,000 stations can meet the hydrogen coverage, capacity, and convenience
needs of all of California’s communities, identified as Disadvantaged Communities or otherwise.

Finding 6: The pace of station development needed to meet EO B-48-18 should ensure sufficient
hydrogen fueling capacity well into 2025.

Finding 7: Due to the anticipated acceleration in hydrogen fueling network growth, sufficient fueling
capacity and coverage should be available by 2025 to enable FCEV deployments at a rate two to three
times greater than currently-reported plans.

Finding 8: Responses to the Clean Vehicle Rebate Project consumer survey provide valuable insight to
confirm fundamental assumptions and analysis methods in CHIT.

Finding 9: California’s State co-funded hydrogen fueling network is on track to meet or exceed
renewable requirements per Senate Bill 150

Finding 10: Achieving 200 stations by 2025 places California on a path to enable the CaFCP goals of
1,000 stations and 1,000,000 FCEVs by 2030 and requires acceleration of the annual station funding and
deployment rate. CARB recommends that the Energy Commission increases funds to hydrogen fueling
station deployments in its next funding program(s) to the maximum feasible extent.


Conclusions:

Conclusions
The past year has been marked by a significant positive shift in the outlook for FCEV deployment and hydrogen
fueling network development. Multiple analyses and industry commitments are pointing toward a desire for
near-term acceleration to build upon the accomplishments made to date. Within California, this would build
upon observations made only a year ago that the FCEV market had moved out of its pre-commercial phase and
into an early commercial market phase. Sustaining forward progress now requires acceleration, including financial
support and the development of a policy environment that enables growth. The right conditions can enable not
only a viable hydrogen fueling network and FCEV market, but one that is self-sustaining and independent of
ongoing State financial support. Governor Brown’s Executive Order B-48-18 provides guideposts for establishing
these conditions, and the CaFCP Vision for 2030 provides a scenario for ultimate success.

The transition to heightened ambitions for FCEV success is only possible because of the accomplishments
made to date. Hydrogen fueling network development and FCEV deployment in the past year have
maintained pace from previous years’ projections, indicating growing maturity in the hydrogen-powered
transportation system in California. Moreover, it appears that today’s FCEV drivers and the auto
manufacturers who supply the vehicles have been able to make greater use of a more limited network
than was previously envisioned. In 2012, the California Fuel Cell Partnership’s “A California Roadmap: The
Commercialization of Hydrogen Fuel Vehicles” [29] envisioned that a network of 68 hydrogen fueling stations
would need to be in place in order to begin commercial sales of vehicles.

Approximately this number of stations are currently funded, but even with 36 of the 64 open and providing
retail sales of hydrogen fuel to the public, California’s FCEV fleet has managed to grow to thousands of
vehicles. As more vehicles are deployed, the overall station network utilization rate increases, and the
business case for the Open-Retail stations improves. This provides vital proof of the future potential to
continue to improve as station technology develops to allow larger-capacity stations at lower cost, demand
from an ever-growing FCEV fleet becomes firmer, and economies of scale become increasingly apparent.

As the analyses of this report indicate, the culmination of these recent developments is a refreshed vision
of California’s hydrogen transportation future. This new vision builds on the extensive experience gained
within the state and acknowledges the potential for long-term industry development goals. Due to these
demonstrated successes and continued State support, there has been an inflection point in the conversations
around hydrogen fuel and FCEVs within California. The consensus outlook from industry and public
stakeholders is increasingly positive, and California stands well-positioned for FCEVs to step into the role they
must ultimately play in order for the State’s long-term GHG reduction goals to become a reality. . . .
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 9215
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: California retail H2 fuel stations

Sat Aug 11, 2018 10:41 am

Some more quotes from the Executive Summary of CARB's 2018 H2/FCEV report:
Over the past twelve months, there has been a significant
shift in the momentum of California’s hydrogen fueling
station network development and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle
(FCEV) deployment. Growth of the on-the-road FCEV fleet
has continued to accelerate year-over-year, with 4,411 FCEVs
registered to the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) as of
April 4, and the most recent industry estimates indicating a
total of 4,819 vehicles deployed through May of 2018
[1]. The
hydrogen fueling network has gained seven additional OpenRetail
stations, for totals of 36 Open-Retail and 28 additional
funded stations. . . .

The California Energy Commission (Energy Commission) also
accomplished a first-of-its-kind milestone for the State, awarding
grant funding to a hydrogen production facility to supply two
tons per day of 100% renewable hydrogen to California’s growing
network of retail fueling stations
. This project begins to address
the potential gap in hydrogen production capacity identified in
last year’s Annual Evaluation, especially in-state and renewable
hydrogen production capacity.

Projections for FCEVs and hydrogen stations in the future
have greatly increased. In January, Governor Brown issued
Executive Order (EO) B-48-18. Among other provisions, the order sets an additional hydrogen station network
development target of 200 stations by 2025
[2]. This is double the current target in Assembly Bill 8 (AB 8; Perea,
Chapter 201, Statues of 2013) but set only two years later [3]. Meeting this ambitious target clearly requires
accelerated effort on the part of the State to ensure its achievement. The EO additionally sets a target for 5
million ZEVs by 2030; FCEVs are expected to comprise a significant portion of this future ZEV fleet.

Moreover, the public/private California Fuel Cell Partnership (CaFCP) members recently published an equally
ambitious shared vision for the potential growth of the industry to 2030. In their vision, the targets of the
Executive Order are a stepping stone on the path to 1,000,000 FCEVs on the road by 2030, supported by a
network of 1,000 hydrogen stations
[4]. Predicated on the continuing development of regulatory and policy
environments sufficient to sustain this remarkably swift growth, CaFCP members anticipate:

    • diversification of hydrogen and fuel cells into other transportation sectors
    • a retail fueling experience that provides station and network convenience
    on par with today’s gasoline station network
    • hydrogen fuel that is cost-competitive with gasoline on a per-mile basis
    • the potential for increased renewable hydrogen production, and
    • a transition away from government financial support and towards industry financial self-reliance

Accomplishing these goals in such a short period of time also requires a significant change in the pace of
developments going forward, along with combined resolve and commitment from all stakeholders. . . .

Projections for on-the-road FCEV counts now exceed 23,000 in 2021 and 47,000 in 2024.
These projections represent increases over the previously reported data. While the total
number of vehicles projected in the long-term continues to grow, a path towards the goals of
the CaFCP members’ vision has not yet been conveyed through the annual survey process.

    • CARB’s scenario analysis for hydrogen fueling station network buildout in support of the CaFCP
    2030 vision can be used as a reference for evaluating proposed station locations in future funding
    programs. Developing a network similar to this reference scenario ensures balanced growth
    between markets that will need a high density of high-capacity stations to supply overlapping
    coverage and providing initial coverage in markets projected to grow soon after today’s
    first-adopter markets are established. Convenience of station locations on par with today’s
    network of 8,000 gasoline fueling stations can be achieved with 1,000 properly-placed
    hydrogen stations to enable both short- and long-distance travel
    . In addition, the network in
    this scenario is able to ensure nearly every member of a Disadvantaged Community (DAC) has
    convenient access to a hydrogen fueling station near their home by 2030, thereby broadening
    the population for whom a switch to a zero-emission FCEV is a viable transportation choice.

    • Hydrogen station network growth must accelerate between now and 2024 in order to meet both
    the 2025 goals of EO B-48-18 and the 2030 goals of the CaFCP. The required acceleration would
    ensure that hydrogen fueling network coverage and capacity lead FCEV deployment and hydrogen
    demand. Therefore, if the station network goals are met, there will be ample support for auto
    manufacturers to accelerate their FCEV deployment
    plans well beyond the rates reported to date.

    • The projected hydrogen refueling station network will
    continue to meet the minimum renewable
    implementation requirements of Senate Bill 1505
    (SB 1505; Lowenthal, Chapter 877, Statutes
    of 2006) [5]. By 2024, the network will dispense
    hydrogen with at least a 34% renewable
    content and the potential to reach 39% according
    to recent industry stakeholder indications. . . .
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

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