GRA
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Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

IEVS: British Plug-In Electric Car Market Expands: Nears 3% Market Share

Wed Aug 15, 2018 12:32 pm

https://insideevs.com/british-plug-in-market-expands-and-heads-to-3-market-share/

. . . In total, some 4,550 new plug-in cars were registered, which is 26% more than year ago, at market share of almost 2.8% (close to the all-time record of 2.9% in December 2017).

Most of the market and growth comes from plug-in hybrids:

881 BEVs (up 3.6% year-over-year)
3,669 PHEVs (up 33.5% year-over-year)

I don't know how whether U.K. subsidies favor BEVs, PHEVs or are even, but I suspect that the lack of home charging for most British households (80% can't, according to one study I posted here not long ago ) is the reason for PHEVs taking such a large lead there. A PHEV can make use of opportunity charging when it's available, and be driven as a high mpg HEV the rest of the time, gradually increasing the amount of electric operating as more chargers are built.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 9390
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: IEVS: British Plug-In Electric Car Market Expands: Nears 3% Market Share

Tue Sep 04, 2018 2:57 pm

Related, also via IEVS:
Electric Car Sales Drop In UK As False Consumer Concerns Remain
https://insideevs.com/electric-car-sales-drop-in-uk-as-false-consumer-concerns-remain/

The characterization of consumer's concerns as 'false' strikes me as inaccurate. There are undoubtedly some cases where people's opinions are based on incorrect info, but most of the concerns seem to be rational:
Drivers still have concerns over electric car range and charging.

Electric car sales have fallen in 2018, despite government plans to encourage drivers into low-emission vehicles.

Figures released by the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) show that registrations of new electric vehicles (EVs) were lower at the end of July than at the same point in 2017.

By this time last year, 8,554 electric cars had been registered, but so far in 2018, just 8,332 have hit the road – a drop of almost three percent.

The RAC said the result was driven by customers’ concerns about electric cars’ range and the UK’s charging infrastructure.

“These figures show that there are still at a significant ‘sticking point’ for sales of pure EV vehicles,” said the organisation’s spokesperson, Pete Williams. “Drivers tell us that they still have anxiety about their range, the time it takes for them to fully charge and inevitably their price.

“Pure EV sales remain low and many are bought as a second vehicle where drivers choose them for local shorter journeys or for the daily commute while retaining a conventionally fuelled car for long journeys and motorway driving. . . .”

But despite the government’s ambition and the rhetoric surrounding cars and air pollution, the results suggest that the public is not yet ready to ditch petrol and diesel engines altogether.

The SMMT’s July vehicle registration figures showed that petrol- and diesel-powered cars still make up the vast majority of vehicles sold, while “alternatively-fuelled vehicles” with electric or hybrid powertrains make up just 5.7 percent of the 1.5 million cars registered so far this year.

However, those in the halls of power may take some solace from the uplift in plug-in hybrid sales.

Registrations for these vehicles, which have both petrol and electric motors and can drive a short distance (often around 30 miles) on battery power alone, have seen registrations rise by nearly 39 percent so far in 2018.

“Plug-in hybrids represent a realistic alternative to conventional petrol and diesel vehicles, being capable of achieving similar ranges,” said Williams. “Many give the option to operate as an emission-free EV in urban locations, yet retain the comfort factor that they can switch to conventional fuel driving when required and furthermore boost their overall economy. . . .
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

SageBrush
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Re: IEVS: British Plug-In Electric Car Market Expands: Nears 3% Market Share

Tue Sep 04, 2018 7:23 pm

Time will tell if people are using the *EV part of the PHEV or just chose it for the tax benefits. If the destination charging is not as convenient as home charging I expect the cars to run on fossil fuel.
2013 LEAF 'S' Model with QC & rear-view camera
Bought off-lease Jan 2017 from N. California
Car is now enjoying an easy life in Colorado
3/2018: 58 Ahr, 28k miles
-----
2018 Tesla Model 3 LR, Delivered 6/2018

GRA
Posts: 9390
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: IEVS: British Plug-In Electric Car Market Expands: Nears 3% Market Share

Wed Sep 05, 2018 4:56 pm

SageBrush wrote:Time will tell if people are using the *EV part of the PHEV or just chose it for the tax benefits. If the destination charging is not as convenient as home charging I expect the cars to run on fossil fuel.

If the UK expands the use of ULEV-only zones beyond a couple of London boroughs I expect we'll see more and more use of the AER. Of course, they'll need a major increase in destination charging to make it work.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

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