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RegGuheert
Posts: 6326
Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2012 4:12 am
Delivery Date: 16 Mar 2012
Leaf Number: 5926
Location: Northern VA

Re: Smelling roses to keep your battery cool

Sat Sep 08, 2018 5:01 am

GetOffYourGas wrote:Assuming you take a route like I-70 to I-64, PlugShare looks pretty sparse right now.
Not only that, but I-64 through WV is a repeating series of long climbs and long descents. I'd want way more than 40 kWh if I were taking an EV on that route.
RegGuheert
2011 Leaf SL Demo vehicle
10K mi. on 041413; 20K mi. (55.7Ah) on 080714; 30K mi. (52.0Ah) on 123015; 40K mi. (49.8Ah) on 020817; 50K mi. (47.2Ah) on 120717; 60K mi. (43.66Ah) on 091918.
Enphase Inverter Measured MTBF: M190, M215, M250, S280

TexasLeaf
Posts: 70
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2018 5:37 am
Delivery Date: 21 Mar 2018
Leaf Number: 303111

Re: Smelling roses to keep your battery cool

Sun Sep 09, 2018 6:42 am

GetOffYourGas wrote:Assuming you take a route like I-70 to I-64, PlugShare looks pretty sparse right now. Electrify America will eventually fill it in, but who knows when.


The Electrify America Cycle 1, which includes several routes between Colorado and Virginia, is suppose to be complete by June of 2019. Considering that EA has only been installing stations since April and already have 12 operational stations with another 52 stations in construction, I fully expect EA to make the June 2019 milestone. Many of the stations between Denver and Chicago, which is the longest CHAdeMO dead spot between Colorado and Denver, are already in construction.

TexasLeaf
Posts: 70
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2018 5:37 am
Delivery Date: 21 Mar 2018
Leaf Number: 303111

Re: Smelling roses to keep your battery cool

Sun Sep 09, 2018 6:50 am

RegGuheert wrote:Not only that, but I-64 through WV is a repeating series of long climbs and long descents. I'd want way more than 40 kWh if I were taking an EV on that route.


You sound like someone that has never driven an electric vehicle in the mountains. Mountain roads are generally a lot flatter than people realize and EVs generally do very well on mountain roads. Anyway, we should probably not be preaching to someone from Denver about driving on mountain roads.

TexasLeaf
Posts: 70
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2018 5:37 am
Delivery Date: 21 Mar 2018
Leaf Number: 303111

Re: Smelling roses to keep your battery cool

Sun Sep 09, 2018 7:06 am

DenverLeaf wrote:I just got my Leaf about a month ago. My Mom live in Virginia, about 1,400 miles. I normally take 3 days traveling straight through. That's about 24-26 hours of driving. Without consideration for heating battery, I'm adding about 15 hours to the trip - just for the hour and a half it takes to charge the car at least 10 times, or another couple of days. Smelling the roses is great, but on a trip like that, I'd rather be smelling the roses with my Mom.
Should I be rethinking taking my new Leaf on a trip like this? Like I said, I'm new to this, so maybe this is something that all EV owners resign to not doing.


I would not discourage you from driving your Leaf from Colorado to Virginia. I am planning on driving my 2018 Leaf from Texas to Colorado at least once a year once the Electrify America stations get built out. But I do think some of your assumptions are unrealistic.

I think you will have to stop at least every 100 miles. So you should expect at least 14 charging stops instead of 10. But you should map out your route using the PlugShare My Trips feature to really see exactly how many stops it will take.

15 hours for charging for 26 hours of driving is probably fine for a winter trip when it's below freezing most of the way. But the battery will charge much slower in the summer months after the first couple of charges. Until you learn more about how to manage your battery temperature, you should assume at least one hour of charging for every one hour of summer driving.

User avatar
RegGuheert
Posts: 6326
Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2012 4:12 am
Delivery Date: 16 Mar 2012
Leaf Number: 5926
Location: Northern VA

Re: Smelling roses to keep your battery cool

Sun Sep 09, 2018 10:53 am

TexasLeaf wrote:
RegGuheert wrote:Not only that, but I-64 through WV is a repeating series of long climbs and long descents. I'd want way more than 40 kWh if I were taking an EV on that route.
You sound like someone that has never driven an electric vehicle in the mountains.
Do I? 'Cause I've been doing it for six-and-a-half years now.
TexasLeaf wrote:Mountain roads are generally a lot flatter than people realize and EVs generally do very well on mountain roads.
It seems you are unaware of the severe brake overheating issues the LEAF has on mountains when regeneration is limited. Given that the 2018 LEAFs tend to limit charging rate drastically, I wonder what happens to regeneration. Perhaps that is not an issue, but I do not know.

But my concern is more related to the challenge that road will pose for the 2018 LEAF with only a 40-kWh battery. The climbs and descents will further increase heating which will make charging times even longer (assuming quick chargers are even available on that route). I don't know of anyone from that area that posts on this forum.
TexasLeaf wrote:Anyway, we should probably not be preaching to someone from Denver about driving on mountain roads.
Why not? He asked for advice and that's what he is getting. Besides, Denver itself is actually fairly flat. You have to go a little to west to the front range before you get mountainous driving in that area.
RegGuheert
2011 Leaf SL Demo vehicle
10K mi. on 041413; 20K mi. (55.7Ah) on 080714; 30K mi. (52.0Ah) on 123015; 40K mi. (49.8Ah) on 020817; 50K mi. (47.2Ah) on 120717; 60K mi. (43.66Ah) on 091918.
Enphase Inverter Measured MTBF: M190, M215, M250, S280

DaveinOlyWA
Posts: 13228
Joined: Sat Apr 24, 2010 7:43 pm
Delivery Date: 16 Feb 2018
Leaf Number: 314199
Location: Olympia, WA
Contact: Website

Re: Smelling roses to keep your battery cool

Mon Sep 10, 2018 6:16 am

High battery temps have not affected my "over the top" regen levels as of yet and yeah, I did Snoqualmie at 128º
2011 SL; 44,598 miles. 2013 S; 44,840 miles.2016 S30 deceased. 29,413 miles. 2018 S40; 11,987 miles, 485 GIDs, 37.6 kwh 110.89 Ahr , SOH 96.00, Hx 115.22
My Blog; http://daveinolywa.blogspot.com" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

SageBrush
Posts: 2800
Joined: Sun Mar 06, 2011 2:28 am
Delivery Date: 13 Feb 2017
Location: Colorado

Re: Smelling roses to keep your battery cool

Mon Sep 10, 2018 6:55 am

TexasLeaf wrote: But the battery will charge much slower in the summer months after the first couple of charges. Until you learn more about how to manage your battery temperature, you should assume at least one hour of charging for every one hour of summer driving.

Yep.
Others have reported an average 30 mph on trips over ~ 150 - 200 miles.
It could be less if the distance between charge stops forces the driver to charge to over 80% SoC
2013 LEAF 'S' Model with QC & rear-view camera
Bought off-lease Jan 2017 from N. California
Car is now enjoying an easy life in Colorado
3/2018: 58 Ahr, 28k miles
-----
2018 Tesla Model 3 LR, Delivered 6/2018

User avatar
RegGuheert
Posts: 6326
Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2012 4:12 am
Delivery Date: 16 Mar 2012
Leaf Number: 5926
Location: Northern VA

Re: Smelling roses to keep your battery cool

Mon Sep 10, 2018 6:57 pm

DaveinOlyWA wrote:High battery temps have not affected my "over the top" regen levels as of yet and yeah, I did Snoqualmie at 128º
O.K. Good to know, Dave.

So it seems they have flip-flopped: In the older vehicles they limited regen to levels lower than the charging rate and on the newer cars they limit the charging rate more than the regen. It's kinda like how the military makes changes. ;)
RegGuheert
2011 Leaf SL Demo vehicle
10K mi. on 041413; 20K mi. (55.7Ah) on 080714; 30K mi. (52.0Ah) on 123015; 40K mi. (49.8Ah) on 020817; 50K mi. (47.2Ah) on 120717; 60K mi. (43.66Ah) on 091918.
Enphase Inverter Measured MTBF: M190, M215, M250, S280

DaveinOlyWA
Posts: 13228
Joined: Sat Apr 24, 2010 7:43 pm
Delivery Date: 16 Feb 2018
Leaf Number: 314199
Location: Olympia, WA
Contact: Website

Re: Smelling roses to keep your battery cool

Tue Sep 11, 2018 5:59 am

RegGuheert wrote:
DaveinOlyWA wrote:High battery temps have not affected my "over the top" regen levels as of yet and yeah, I did Snoqualmie at 128º
O.K. Good to know, Dave.

So it seems they have flip-flopped: In the older vehicles they limited regen to levels lower than the charging rate and on the newer cars they limit the charging rate more than the regen. It's kinda like how the military makes changes. ;)


Well, I blogged about a situation I had with over 98% SOC and still regened at greater than 11 KW.

The whole thing has characteristics of poorly written software... I did a dozen full charges to get a baseline for a new pack and got 12 different results. All done overnight in a garage where the temps varied less than 5º during those charges so... I don't know.
2011 SL; 44,598 miles. 2013 S; 44,840 miles.2016 S30 deceased. 29,413 miles. 2018 S40; 11,987 miles, 485 GIDs, 37.6 kwh 110.89 Ahr , SOH 96.00, Hx 115.22
My Blog; http://daveinolywa.blogspot.com" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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