There are a bunch of types of lithium batteries what type is a given 12v?

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Bombastinator2

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There are several rechargeable types i know of that are currently for sale (and more that are still being researched and are currently vaporware) they include:

li-ion itself has many variants which kind of run the gamu t. They include:
LiPO, unknown
NiMH, variants are minor
Lifpo, also a few minor variants
Litio3 (or LTO) unknown

There’s also:
Lead acid, not really any variants, (or a bunch depending on how granular you want to get)
Nicad, unknown

When someone is talking about a lithium 12v they are likely talking about one of the first four, but which one? I would kind of assume litio3, as it has the most charge cycles and temperature resistance, but it’s pricey (not sure why) and they will all theoretically do it, so i just don’t know.
 
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I can't speak to any of the others. but NiMH, nickel-metal hydride, is not a lithium-ion battery type at all. It has a cell voltage of about 1.2 V and is a greatly improved successor to NiCd or Nicad, nickel-cadmium: longer working life, higher capacity, and contains no toxic cadmium.
 
When someone is talking about a lithium 12v they are likely talking about one of the first four, but which one?
None of those: when people talk about a Lithium 12v starter battery they are typically talking about LiFePO4 (Lithium-Iron-Phosphate).
See my sig; there are some good Lithium threads on the forum (add my name to the search).
 
I can't speak to any of the others. but NiMH, nickel-metal hydride, is not a lithium-ion battery type at all. It has a cell voltage of about 1.2 V and is a greatly improved successor to NiCd or Nicad, nickel-cadmium: longer working life, higher capacity, and contains no toxic cadmium.
Argh. I thought inr was a variant of NiMH, rather than li-ion. Now I don’t know. If NiMH is a variant of NiCad, what is INR?
 
None of those: when people talk about a Lithium 12v starter battery they are typically talking about LiFePO4 (Lithium-Iron-Phosphate).
See my sig; there are some good Lithium threads on the forum (add my name to the search).
LiPO4 is a variant of LiPO. There was a LiPO3 too,or o I thought. I am getting LiFePO and LiPO confused. Which was dumb. I will add LiFePO to that list. Derp, and thx.
 
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I thought the PO in LiPO was polymer not phosphate. Are LiFePOs lithium iron phosphate polymer? Or are LiPOs lithium phosphate? Or is LiFePO more accurate as LiFePo? Or am I just messing it up again?
 
Googling.
IMR is more properly Li-Mn
ICR is Li-Co
INR is Li-NiMnCoO2

Which are all Li-ion

Before there was LiFePO4 there Was LiFePO3 and LiFePO2 though I thought, so LiFePO4 would be a minor varient of LiFePO then. Is this also wrong? I’m getting the impression that it is because I’m not seeing any reference to em. I thought I remembered seeing a LiFePO2 &3 though. Argh. I don’t know what the 4 stands for I’ve seen it “4” and “₄” though
 
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I thought the PO in LiPO was polymer not phosphate. Are LiFePOs lithium iron phosphate polymer? Or are LiPOs lithium phosphate? Or is LiFePO more accurate as LiFePo? Or am I just messing it up again?
LiPo doesn't not equal LiFePO.
Lithium Polymer (LiPo) batteries are used in RC planes/boats/cars/etc. They are very light with a very high energy density...and catch fire very easily (also very sensitive to charging algorithms).
 
LiPo doesn't not equal LiFePO.
Lithium Polymer (LiPo) batteries are used in RC planes/boats/cars/etc. They are very light with a very high energy density...and catch fire very easily (also very sensitive to charging algorithms).
My memory is it’s one of the older chemistries, and is both cheap and energy dense, plus it has the unique ability that it can be formed into almost any shape. It’s what’s in almost everything these days. Ear pods, laptops, etc.. it’s got some problems though, one of which is that it has to be managed constantly, or boom. I worry that discarded Lithium polymer batteries are going to be a serious problem eventually. They’re sort of tiny incindiary bombs that go off when their containment is breached. They’re also sometimes referred to as “bag batteries” because their containment system includes a folded bag to capture gas. If the bag isn’t big enough(or gets a hole worn in it) and the thing starts outgassing one gets highly flammable gas leaking somewhere. They creep me out a bit.
 
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LiFePo4 batteries have been around for many years, under names like "Lithium Iron" and lately, the alias "LFP."Until fairly recently, the combination of their high price and low energy density (in comparison to other lithium chemistries) have made them a niche battery. Now, though, with somewhat higher energy density and a safety record that has caught the attention of those concerned about thermal runaway in other lithium types, LFP batteries are turning up in home energy storage systems, and even in Teslas - primarily Chinese market models. I've switched to them in my electric-assist bikes, and I'm hardly alone...
 
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My memory was there was a capital D at the end before the number on the 2 and 3. It might be a yet different chemistry. They were being sold as rechargeable double As or something. There is a “lifepod” but it has something to do with water and is a safe or some type of safety gear or something. It actually uses LiFePO4 batteries. I do wish I knew what the number on the end stood for. It could just be 4 oxygens, but I don’t know. Anyway asked and answered though. The batteries being referred to are at least usually lithium iron.
 
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123s are kind of like half a 14500 or an 18650. They still make em. I’ve seen people use them in devices where they wanted twice as much power. They’d use two of those instead of one of the other
 
Have at it for an education. Good resource on all types of batteries.
https://batteryuniversity.com/article/bu-205-types-of-lithium-ion

123 were a brand if LiFePO4. They came in 14500 and 26650 size. I still have a couple very old 123 in flashlights.
Safer lithium tech, but much lower energy density and somewhat lower voltage.
i was under the impression 123 was a form factor not a brand or a chemistry. I used them around 2010 for ecigs. Some still do to turn single tube mods like provaris into double battery 7v mods. It may be that 123 became a form factor because of devices built for 123s. I know I had some that were IMR because they had it written on it, though that may have been the manufacturer (yay 3 letter acronyms :/) I’m not sure how current batteryuniverrsity is. This stuff has been changing as fast as microcomputers lately. There was a company in Asia somewhere that had their factory burn down which affected supply. This was long before covid. The same sort of thing happened to latex matreses which was eventually fixed so latex mattresses are back. So you might be able to get new batteries for your flashlights and they will shine brighter.
This sort of thing caused some deaths with ecigs. Old 18650s didn’t have enough energy in them to breach a containment cylinder so there were mech mods made for a while that were basically containment cylinders. New batteries came out though in the same form factor that were a lot more powerful and did. This was catastrophic because what they would do is build up pressure then rupture which more or less turned them into grenades complete with flying metal (along with the burning lithium). New chemistry batteries that fit in old devices can be quite dangerous.
 
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