jlsoaz
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Re: Drive option that better incorporates neutral/coasting

Sat Jan 05, 2013 5:22 pm

edatoakrun wrote:
If you want to minimize the energy loss to air resistance to travel any given distance over any given time, maintaining as close to constant speed as conditions permit is optimal. And this of course requires using the accelerator/regen pedal.
http://www.mynissanleaf.com/viewtopic.p ... 0&start=90" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Hi - I'm not sure I'm understanding where you are getting this claim from. Is this some sort of common-knowledge firmly-established principle of aerodynamics and physics?

Apart from efficiency considerations, in general, I do agree that introducing wide variance in speed in one's driving is not desirable from a general safe defensive driving point of view.
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DaveinOlyWA
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Re: Drive option that better incorporates neutral/coasting

Sat Jan 05, 2013 5:54 pm

jlsoaz wrote:
edatoakrun wrote:
If you want to minimize the energy loss to air resistance to travel any given distance over any given time, maintaining as close to constant speed as conditions permit is optimal. And this of course requires using the accelerator/regen pedal.
http://www.mynissanleaf.com/viewtopic.p ... 0&start=90" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Hi - I'm not sure I'm understanding where you are getting this claim from. Is this some sort of common-knowledge firmly-established principle of aerodynamics and physics?

Apart from efficiency considerations, in general, I do agree that introducing wide variance in speed in one's driving is not desirable from a general safe defensive driving point of view.
he is talking about driving on a constant velocity trip like a freeway or something. iow, completely different topic. we are talking about city driving, large amounts of stop and go and speed variations.
What a nice way to put things.

I respect the thinking and passion you're putting in to driving the vehicle, but my own goal here is to ask if the efficiency gains you and other pioneers are evidently attaining can be made easier for other drivers
and that is exactly what we are trying to say. Let me emphasize that dead banding could be just as good as neutral, but dead banding requires a lot of concentration and you will slip back and forth from power to regen and every little teeny weeny slip is a loss of range. be it 10 feet or 1000 feet, its still a loss. This conversation has really gone to "how bad is driving in neutral?" as these types of threads always do.

my post was an attempt to emphasize that neutral is not bad because this is quite simply not that kind of car. it does not have a transmission, gears to grind or any of that stuff so all the legacy baggage associated with the "neutral is bad" club does not apply here.
Switching into and out of neutral (whether by switching to R while in forward motion or by holding at N for a couple of seconds) and then switching out of neutral seems a hassle that some won't bother with while a switch or attenuator, or a widened better-defined pedal zone might require less futzing to achieve the same or similar result.
so you think some sort of user settable feature that controls the action of the accelerator is a better idea? this would be something that is changed constantly depending on what kind of driving you plan to do. seems like THIS would be something users would not want to do. I think a "super regen" button on the steering wheel or something might be nice for those fast stops to maximize the recapture of power but other than that, digging into an on screen menu nearly every day to change this?

besides, I am currently driving a car called a Ford Fiesta that has a large dead area on the accelerator . I HATE the feeling. besides, as we all know, the dead band position on the pedal is speed dependent. the faster you go, the more regen is possible which means dead banding is a moving target. another reason why it is simply much more difficult. besides? why not shift? maybe its just me and the fact that I was in my mid twenties before i ever own an automatic transmission car
I didn't realize that your thinking was so focused on this aspect of avoiding using the brake. We had a separate and I think good-looking suggestion for an indicator that helps us know when we are using the friction brake.
That would be a great idea. the Prius has it (called "HSI" hybrid System Indicator) and so do some other EVs but then again, its one more thing to look at instead of the road. once again, my personal feeling is that there is unfounded reasons for resistance to using neutral as a tool.

using neutral to shift allows you to watch the road including lights that may change, how much traffic is piling up in front you, etc. another thing to look at is kinda cool. did it in my Prius all the time. SO probably did too (which could be why she rear ended someone in it)
2011 SL; 44,598 mi, 87% SOH. 2013 S; 44,840 mi, 91% SOH. 2016 S30; 29,413 mi, 99% SOH. 2018 S; 25,185 mi, SOH 92.23%. 2019 S Plus; 7059.6 mi, 95.35% SOH
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KeiJidosha
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Re: Drive option that better incorporates neutral/coasting

Sun Jan 06, 2013 2:55 pm

jlsoaz wrote:
DaveinOlyWA wrote:most of this has probably already been said;

** it might or might not be the same efficiently to "dead band" (driving in gear at zero power use according to energy screen) but facts are , it is A LOT HARDER TO DO. and let me clarify coasting in neutral requires no more effort than shifting into reverse.
Hi Dave: I agree, as the vehicle is presently set up, exact dead-banding is a lot harder (or impossible over long distances). One of the suggestions that was made in this thread that maybe should get some consideration from Nissan is making it so that the dead band range in the pedal is wider and with boundaries (whereas at present there seem to be none). I'm not sure if this is my favorite suggestion for making neutral easier for those of us who are uncomfortable switching the car out of gear.
Active E already does this. It has a Glide detent in the accelerator. You can rent an ActiveE in the bay area to see if it's what you had in mind.
- 2009 BMW MINI E > 2013 Honda Fit EV > 2017 Chevy Bolt EV
- 2013 Ford C-Max Energi > 2020 Jaguar I-Pace HSE

KeiJidosha
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Re: Drive option that better incorporates neutral/coasting

Sun Jan 06, 2013 3:15 pm

walterbays wrote:
Caracalover wrote:It would be great to have a no regeneration switch. With it on you gain no energy, with it off you then gain as much as the modes you are in allow.
I read about one EV with a control on the steering wheel to increase or decrease regen. I don't remember which car it was, but it sounds like exactly what I'd like.
AC Propulsion eBox. A slide control on the right side of the dashboard adjusted the max value of regen.
- 2009 BMW MINI E > 2013 Honda Fit EV > 2017 Chevy Bolt EV
- 2013 Ford C-Max Energi > 2020 Jaguar I-Pace HSE

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