GRA
Posts: 12393
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

GCC: EEA: average CO2 emissions from new cars and new vans in Europe increased in 2018

Tue Jun 25, 2019 6:06 pm

https://www.greencarcongress.com/2019/0 ... 5-eea.html
According to provisional data published by the European Environment Agency (EEA), the average CO2 emissions from new passenger cars registered in the European Union (EU) in 2018 increased for the second consecutive year, reaching 120.4 grams of CO2 per kilometer.

For the first time, the average CO2 emissions from new vans also increased. Manufacturers will have to reduce emissions of their fleet significantly to meet the upcoming 2020 and 2021 targets.

After a steady decline from 2010 to 2016, by almost 22 grams of CO2 per kilometer (g CO2/km), average emissions from new passenger cars increased in 2017 by 0.4 g CO2/km. According the provisional data, the upward trend continued with an additional increase of 2.0 g CO2/km in 2018.

Vans registered in the EU and Iceland in 2018 emitted on average 158.1 g CO2/km—2.0 grams more than in 2017. This is the first increase in average CO2 emissions from new vans since the regulation came into force in 2011, following a sharp decrease in 2017.

The main factors contributing to the increase of new passenger cars’ emissions in 2018 include the growing share of gasoline cars in new registrations, in particular in the sport utility vehicle (SUV) segment. Moreover, the market penetration of zero- and low-emission vehicles, including electric cars, remained slow in 2018. With the 2021 target of 95 g CO2/km approaching, much faster deployment of cars with low emissions is needed across Europe, according to EEA.

Many factors affected the increase in CO2 emissions from new vans in 2018, including an increase in the mass, engine capacity and size of the vehicles. The market share of gasoline vehicles also increased, constituting 3.6% of the new vans fleet (2.4% in 2017). The share of zero- and low-emission vans remained at the same level (1.7%) as in 2017. Further efficiency improvements are needed to reach the EU target of 147 g CO2/km set for 2020, EEA said. . . .

Sales of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) and battery-electric vehicles (BEV) continued to increase. With around 150,000 registrations, sales of BEVs increased by 50% compared to 2017. However, the combined share of PHEVs and BEVs in all car sales remains low (2% compared to 1.5% in 2017).

The combined shares of PHEV and BEV sales were highest in Iceland (15%), Sweden (8.4%) and the Netherlands (6.8%). Together with Estonia, Finland and Malta, these were the only countries where the average emissions of new cars decreased from 2017 to 2018. . . .
Related, also GCC:
Electrified vehicles count for 7.1% of new vehicles in Europe in May; SUVs continue to dominate full market
https://www.greencarcongress.com/2019/0 ... -jato.html
Registrations of pure electric, plug-in hybrid and hybrid cars totalled 94,000 units in 18 European markets in May 2019, counting for 7.1% of the total volume, up from 5.3% in May 2018, according to figures from JATO Dynamics.

The majority of registrations came from hybrid vehicles, but the growth was driven by pure electric cars, where registrations jumped from 12,300 units in May 2018 to 22,300 (+81%) last month.

The Renault Zoe was the top-selling electric car in Europe last month, but the Tesla Model 3 continues to lead the year-to-date rankings. However, registrations for the Model 3 fell from 15,755 in March to 3,659 in April, and 2,820 in May. . . .

Overall, the European car market remained stable in May 2019 for the second month in a row. In total, 1.44 million vehicles were registered—a 0.2% increase on May 2018.

The stable results from April and May signify an end to the market’s extended period of decline between September 2018 and March 2019. However, year-to-date figures show 6.91 million vehicles have been registered so far in 2019—a decline of 2% on the same period last year.

SUVs once again drove market growth in May, offsetting the drops posted by the traditional segments. While demand for subcompact, compact, midsize and executive/luxury cars and MPVs fell during the month, demand for SUVs was up by 10% to 534,700 units. . . .
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

Oilpan4
Posts: 1771
Joined: Wed Jan 09, 2019 10:51 pm
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Leaf Number: 004270

Re: GCC: EEA: average CO2 emissions from new cars and new vans in Europe increased in 2018

Sat Jun 29, 2019 5:23 pm

My leaf and it's trailer are my SUV.
"THE ABOVE POST CONTAINS MISLEADING AND INACCURATE INFORMATION. PLEASE CONSIDER IT OPINION, NOT FACT". -someone who I offended and is unable to produce the facts in question.

GRA
Posts: 12393
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: GCC: EEA: average CO2 emissions from new cars and new vans in Europe increased in 2018

Wed Mar 04, 2020 6:26 pm

GCC:
JATO: new car average CO2 emissions highest in Europe since 2014; slow EV uptake insufficient to counter fewer diesels and more SUVs
https://www.greencarcongress.com/2020/0 ... -jato.html


In addition to the European car market recording tepid growth in 2019, CO2 emissions have continued to increase, despite new regulation designed to curtail this, according to JATO Dynamics. Last year, the volume-weighted average CO2 emissions for European markets were at their highest recorded levels since 2014. According to data from JATO Dynamics, the average for the 23 European markets totalled 121.8 g/km under the NEDC regime—the third such annual increase in a row.

Although last year’s average was 1.3 g/km higher than in 2018, the delta was lower than the difference between the 2017 and 2018 results—where the growth was 2.4 g/km.

Despite an increase of EV models contributing positively to emission levels, the move away from diesel had a negative impact, one that the market could not offset.

  • The average emissions of electrified vehicles, was 63.2 g/km, almost half that produced by diesel and petrol vehicles. The problem arose because EVs only accounted for 6% of total registrations, which is not yet a high enough figure to create a positive change.

    —Felipe Munoz
Four of the five major markets in Europe posted higher averages in 2019 than in 2018. Average emissions for Germany, Britain, Italy, and Spain increased, ranging from a rise of 0.8 g/km for Germany to an increase of 3.0 g/km for Italy. This was in part caused by marked changes in attitude and regulations around the use of diesel fuels which has had the unintended consequence of pushing people to drive higher-CO2-emitting gasoline vehicles.

France was the only market to see better results, as its average fell from 112.0 g/km in 2018 to 111.1 g/km last year. Despite this positive change, their emission levels were still higher than the averages they recorded in 2016 and 2017.

Pure electric cars have a 2% market share in France, this being the highest share among all five major markets. France is therefore leading the way in showing how electric cars can have a measurable impact on emissions levels, despite their adoption still lagging behind diesel and gasoline counterparts.

France has seen this higher level of market penetration in part due to the adoption of more affordable cars such as the Renault Zoe, which is soon to be followed by the Peugeot 208-e. . . .

The other markets recording large improvements in emissions levels were Sweden and the Netherlands. The latter reduced its average by 5.9 g/km, in turn becoming the country with the lowest result in the European Union (this excludes Denmark, Portugal and Finland who can’t be compared to other markets as they published WLTP data rather than NEDC values).

The improvement was due to their mix between diesel and pure electric cars. In 2018, for every BEV registered there were 2.3 diesel new cars in the Netherlands; one year later this changed significantly to 1.9 BEVs for every diesel car registered.

Toyota holds its position as the top 20 best-selling brand with the lowest average CO2 emissions in Europe. Alongside this, the Japanese manufacturer also saw the largest decrease since 2018, with its average falling by 2.3 g/km. Toyota’s success is largely based on its popular hybrid range, with registrations making up 60% of the brand total volume in 2019.

In the group ranking, Toyota was a major leader, only behind Tesla. Along with Lexus brand, Toyota posted an average of 99.0 g/km of CO2 in 2019, 14.3 g/km less than the next best in the ranking, PSA. At group level, Nissan Group, Renault Group, Mitsubishi and Suzuki posted average emissions lower than the total market’s average of 121.8 g/km. Volkswagen Group, Europe’s largest maker, recorded an average of 123.6 g/km. . . .

However, the popularity of SUVs is having a negative impact on the average emission levels, and this is evident in the average CO2 emissions when analyzed by segment.

The average CO2 emissions for SUVs was 131.5 g/km, which was higher than emissions posted from city-cars (107.7 g/km), subcompacts (109.2 g/km), compacts (115.3 g/km), midsize (117.9 g/km), and executive cars (131 g/km). In addition to this, SUVs made up 38% of total registrations in EU-18.

  • The SUV segment of the market urgently needs more electrified models. To date, the focus for EVs has been on traditional hatchbacks and sedans, leaving very few choices in the SUV market. If these vehicles want to keep gaining traction and avoid future sanctions, they need to be electrified.

    —Felipe Munoz

There's a list showing the ranking by brand.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 12393
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: GCC: EEA: average CO2 emissions from new cars and new vans in Europe increased in 2018

Wed Jun 10, 2020 5:35 pm

ABG:
Report: Automakers well on their way to missing 2050 climate targets

Lockdowns may help in the short term, but manufacturing is still off-target

https://www.autoblog.com/2020/06/10/aut ... e-targets/
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

Oilpan4
Posts: 1771
Joined: Wed Jan 09, 2019 10:51 pm
Delivery Date: 10 May 2018
Leaf Number: 004270

Re: GCC: EEA: average CO2 emissions from new cars and new vans in Europe increased in 2018

Fri Jun 12, 2020 12:57 am

Are you sure its the Auto makers and not the the people buying them?
"THE ABOVE POST CONTAINS MISLEADING AND INACCURATE INFORMATION. PLEASE CONSIDER IT OPINION, NOT FACT". -someone who I offended and is unable to produce the facts in question.

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