RustyShackleford
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dumb question about quick charging

Thu Jun 27, 2019 2:01 pm

I've looked at the manual honest ...

Our new 2018 Leaf SV has the quick charge port; great ! But we just went to a Charge Point station and the equipment there plugs into the smaller J1772 port on the car, not the big quick-charge port. Will it still charge at the quick-charge rate (1hr or so) or will it only charge at the Level2 rate (8 hours for the 40kwh battery) ? I'm thinking the latter - meaning that just because a charging station is publicly (and often freely) available does not mean it's any faster than Level2 (that is, it is not guaranteed to be Level 3).
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goldbrick
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Re: dumb question about quick charging

Thu Jun 27, 2019 2:02 pm

It will charge at the L2 rate, which can vary from one EVSE to another and also often depends on whether or not there is one or two cars plugged into the EVSE, if it has 2 plugs on one pole.

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Randy
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Re: dumb question about quick charging

Thu Jun 27, 2019 2:09 pm

You need to find a DC Fast charger that has a Chademo connector, not the CCS or Combo connector that looks like a J1772 connector with two larger pins at the bottom. Are there any eVgo stations near you? They have some of each connector, but you'll be able to see a Chademo connector at their sites...

RustyShackleford
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Re: dumb question about quick charging

Thu Jun 27, 2019 2:17 pm

Thanks for being gentle, guys. One's initial impression is that all public charging stations are capable of quick charging. No. And it sounds like one of these public L2 stations may not even provide the full 6.6kw rate, especially if two cars are connected.
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davewill
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Re: dumb question about quick charging

Thu Jun 27, 2019 3:01 pm

RustyShackleford wrote:Thanks for being gentle, guys. One's initial impression is that all public charging stations are capable of quick charging. No. And it sounds like one of these public L2 stations may not even provide the full 6.6kw rate, especially if two cars are connected.
Most public J1772 stations provide 30a @ 208 volts for 6.2 kW. Sometimes they will be a full 6.6kW, a few will be limited to 16a or 24a. A very few will be higher amperages like 40a or 70a. There may be a few that share power like you suggest, but most stations with two plugs supply the full power to both. Plugshare.com is the place (and app) that's best for both finding public charging as getting these kinds of details about a site. You also get user feedback about reliability.
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SageBrush
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Re: dumb question about quick charging

Thu Jun 27, 2019 7:41 pm

Check out plugshare.com
The locations specify the charging options, and you can filter by charging type.
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wmcbrine
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Re: dumb question about quick charging

Sat Jun 29, 2019 9:37 am

The vast majority of public charging stations are in fact Level 2, not DCFC. You can see this on PlugShare, where DCFC stations are marked in orange, and others are marked in green. (Turn off "Wall", which are Level 1, for best results -- although the effect is even more pronounced if you don't.)

DCFC equipment is an order of magnitude more expensive than Level 2 EVSEs to install and run, hence its relative rarity.

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SalisburySam
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Re: dumb question about quick charging

Sun Jun 30, 2019 5:04 am

@Rusty, there is another factor to the CHAdeMO-vs.-J1772 (L3 vs. L2) issue: type of current. The wall plug and L2 charging stations are all alternating current suppliers. The vehicle’s J1772 port goes to a device in the vehicle that converts it to direct current which in turn charges the battery. So L1/L2 charges are limited by the vehicle itself and how much current it is designed to accept. This limit has changed over time and model year.

L3 charging stations and the larger port on your vehicle are all direct current and the conversion device in the car is bypassed so the juice is going directly to the battery. Now the amperage/voltage limitation is at the charging station primarily vs. the car in the other scenario.

Lastly the L2/L1 charging stations are all single phase, likely how your home is wired. L3 stations are three phase, more typical of commercial installations and far, far more expensive. The charging station equipment is also more expensive to handle the much-increased current flow safely. For example, you can likely install a 240v charging station in your home for well under $1000 today. Our city installed an L3 station and the costs NOT including permitting and already on city-owned property was just a bit over $25,000. While that was three years ago and included the add-ons for accepting credit cards, installing an L3 station is not an inexpensive proposition.
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lorenfb
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Re: dumb question about quick charging

Sun Jun 30, 2019 9:33 am

SalisburySam wrote: L3 charging stations and the larger port on your vehicle are all direct current and the conversion device in the car is bypassed so the juice is going directly to the battery. Now the amperage/voltage limitation is at the charging station primarily vs. the car in the other scenario.

The vehicle's BMS does the primary control of the charging current.
SalisburySam wrote:Lastly the L2/L1 charging stations are all single phase, likely how your home is wired.
Most all homes are wired for two phase (~ 220V for some applications), and that provides the ability to develop the higher L2 charging power.
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SalisburySam
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Re: dumb question about quick charging

Sun Jun 30, 2019 10:29 am

lorenfb wrote:
SalisburySam wrote:
SalisburySam wrote:Lastly the L2/L1 charging stations are all single phase, likely how your home is wired.
Most all homes are wired for two phase (~ 220V for some applications), and that provides the ability to develop the higher L2 charging power.
Er, no. Two phase hasn't been in use for any but very specialized applications in many decades. Home current is usually a transformer at a telephone pole or on the ground that reduces transmission voltages of 12kv-14kv to two 120v lines and a neutral that connect to your home's meter.
This is the service entrance. These go through the home's meter and to the main load center for the home. This is always where, by code, neutral and grounds may be bonded. This is a single phase system, sometimes called a split phase system because of the two 120v lines. 240v appliances (dryers, electric stoves, ovens, etc.) use two 120v hot lines bridging the current within the device to 240v. This does not make it a two-phase system.
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