srl99
Posts: 205
Joined: Thu Aug 16, 2012 7:04 am
Delivery Date: 16 Aug 2012

Re: EVSE Installation, Info and Cost Comparison Thread

Mon Aug 20, 2012 11:19 am

Seems like there must be a new wave of EVSEs right around the corner.

The Rav4-EV charges at 40A, and the 2013 Leaf will charge at 32A? (6.6kW), the Ford Focus charges at 32A? (6.6kW) ... aside from the Leviton already announced, is there any info on the next wave EVSEs?

Price/availability of the Leviton 40A EVSE ($1590 and up, for Rav4EV customers - including installation http://toyota.leviton.com/faqs-rav4ev-customers" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;), 30A is a bit cheaper ($1499 and up, includes installation).

Maybe there's a "blow out" coming for the lower amperage EVSEs?

Can we exclude discussion of those vendors whose EVSEs "go to 11" (SPX), in their spec's but not in the real world.

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TimeHorse
Posts: 999
Joined: Thu May 13, 2010 4:40 am
Delivery Date: 02 Nov 2011

Re: EVSE Installation, Info and Cost Comparison Thread

Tue Aug 21, 2012 8:54 am

srl99 wrote:Seems like there must be a new wave of EVSEs right around the corner.

The Rav4-EV charges at 40A, and the 2013 Leaf will charge at 32A? (6.6kW), the Ford Focus charges at 32A? (6.6kW) ... aside from the Leviton already announced, is there any info on the next wave EVSEs?

Price/availability of the Leviton 40A EVSE ($1590 and up, for Rav4EV customers - including installation http://toyota.leviton.com/faqs-rav4ev-customers" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;), 30A is a bit cheaper ($1499 and up, includes installation).

Maybe there's a "blow out" coming for the lower amperage EVSEs?

Can we exclude discussion of those vendors whose EVSEs "go to 11" (SPX), in their spec's but not in the real world.
In my months of researching EVSEs I've only seen one stalwart constant and that's ClipperCreek. That's what the Mini-E used, that's what the Tesla Roadster used, that's what I used. There's a 32A or so version that should support most of the current crop and the CS-100 which I have that is very underutilized on a 2012 Nissan LEAF but could push a 2-Charger Tesla Model S (19kW) to its max running the highest J1772 current allowed, 80A.

Now, most public EVSEs, like the Aeronviron, Coulomb, Blink are as far as I can tell running at about 30A with 24A their actual high. That comes out to 5.76kW which is what we observed when my friend charged his Tesla Roadster at a local Coulomb. So the nirvana of every EVSE supporting 6.7kW or essentially 28A on a 40A circuit (30A couldn't safely run 28A sustained) isn't quite there but for the 2013 LEAF and other 6.7kW chargers that's what you need. For the record, the LEAF's "3.3kW" charger actually accepts a 16A circuit, not a 12A like the Volt though it's charger is rather inefficient so ends up charging the battery closer to 3.3kW not the 3.7kW you read on your EVSE (as told to me by an engineer working on modding the LEAF to support inductive charging).

The point is expect most chargers to be somewhere between 5.76kW and maybe as much as 7.68kW (32A or maybe 36A/8.64kW if the wire gauge is sufficient; that's getting near the limit for sustained current at 40A max) but don't expect everyone to do 6.67kW, alas the future.
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