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Re: 30A Circuit Breaker tripped on Nissan Leaf

Posted: Wed Sep 05, 2012 1:35 pm
by camasleaf
If the house is wired to share neutrals then modern loads that create harmonics can overload the neutral and cause fires. Have a well-qualified electrician look at your situation.
There is very good reason NEC does not allow shared neutrals anymore.

As for the 30A breaker tripping on overload at 25A, it should not happen on a normal breaker, ... but it could on an old breaker.

Re: 30A Circuit Breaker tripped on Nissan Leaf

Posted: Wed Sep 05, 2012 7:17 pm
by MikeD
camasleaf: I personally would agree that "shared neutrals" should be avoided for several very good safety reasons that I won't go into. However, as I read the 2008 NEC (Article 210.4), shared neutrals are allowed. Was there a change in the 2011 NEC?

Re: 30A Circuit Breaker tripped on Nissan Leaf

Posted: Wed Sep 05, 2012 7:31 pm
by cwerdna
FairwoodRed wrote:You don’t happen to live in the Seattle area do you?
Yet another reason why the location field should be mandatory.

Re: 30A Circuit Breaker tripped on Nissan Leaf

Posted: Thu Sep 06, 2012 9:08 am
by FairwoodRed
cwerdna wrote:
FairwoodRed wrote:You don’t happen to live in the Seattle area do you?
Yet another reason why the location field should be mandatory.
I don't mind asking the question when I want to know. I much prefer each person being able to chose how much information to share, rather than being forced to share regardless of personal want or need. I vote for personal choice!

Re: 30A Circuit Breaker tripped on Nissan Leaf

Posted: Thu Sep 06, 2012 1:05 pm
by camasleaf
MikeD wrote:camasleaf: I personally would agree that "shared neutrals" should be avoided for several very good safety reasons that I won't go into. However, as I read the 2008 NEC (Article 210.4), shared neutrals are allowed. Was there a change in the 2011 NEC?
I was missinformed it is still alowed in 2011 NEC.

I had a NEC class early this year, and I clearly remember the instructor saying that it was not allowed anymore.

Re: 30A Circuit Breaker tripped on Nissan Leaf

Posted: Thu Sep 06, 2012 10:20 pm
by garygid
Or, the breaker is bad, and needs to be replaced.

Re: 30A Circuit Breaker tripped on Nissan Leaf

Posted: Fri Sep 07, 2012 12:43 am
by planet4ever
Even if a breaker is bad, replacing it is not the answer. A 240v circuit should never have 120v taps for garage door openers, solar water heater controllers, sensor lights, and wall plugs. yorkhung needs a 240v circuit which is only used to charge the LEAF.

Ray

Re: 30A Circuit Breaker tripped on Nissan Leaf

Posted: Fri Sep 07, 2012 3:05 am
by pchilds
This garage looks like the one in a house I owned. If the wiring has cloth insulation, you need to get the house rewired, before it burns down. I would guess there have been a lot changes to the wiring in the 50+ years this house has been in use. My guess would be that a sub panel being run off the dryer breaker. My house had one circuit feed from two breakers in two different panels. Old houses are so much fun.

Re: 30A Circuit Breaker tripped on Nissan Leaf

Posted: Fri Sep 07, 2012 11:12 am
by Nubo
I don't know what to make of this thread. On the one hand the OP reports they studied Electrical Engineering. On the other hand the circuit is popping from a 16A load and they talk about swapping the 30A breaker with a 70A. And then that picture! :o.

I don't fancy myself as an electrician by any means and I had a lot of questions here when trying to plan my own EVSE installation. But this really is out there.

Either the OP was having a little fun with us, or I'm worried since they haven't been back for awhile!!

Re: 30A Circuit Breaker tripped on Nissan Leaf

Posted: Fri Sep 07, 2012 12:12 pm
by gfederas
I am not an electrician, but when my home was remodeled in 2000, it required a main panel upgrade. I understand that under current code each major appliance requires it's own dedicated breaker. i.e., AC, refrigerator, range/oven, microwave, electric water heater, washer, dryer, etc. There is also a limit to how may plugs can be wired onto a single breaker. It makes sense that 120V circuits have breakers separate from the 240V circuits. A qualified electrician would be familiar with all current codes and can remove any immediate fire hazards, and re-wire the home to current safety standards. Of course, you should get multiple bids from several electricians to perhaps save some money, but every electrician that sees your wiring would come to the same conclusion - it's a fire waiting to happen. I wouldn't sleep at night knowing what you've shared about your electrical wiring. We wouldn't want the next newspaper headline telling the story of how another EV household burned down.