Page 1 of 3

Battery pack heat pads installation

Posted: Sat Jan 25, 2014 12:16 pm
by Yvesm
Hello to all,

Last spring, I figured that my new to me 2011 Leaf could need help next winter. I do not have a heated garage or even a garage. The car is always outside at home and work. Only plugged in at home

I saw car engine oil pan heat pads many years ago like:
Image

So I figured I could mimic the 300 watts Leaf Winter Package by installing 6 x 50 watts heat pads under the battery pack. Took the task this autumn. Unfortunalty it was freezing and the daylight no longer lasting long enough, I did not take pictures.

I bought 6 pads and a thermal cube that turns On at -18C and turns Off at -12C:
The pads: http://www.amazon.com/Kats-24050-Watt-U ... B000I8YPQ4
And the TC1 switch : http://www.amazon.com/Farm-Innovators-T ... B001ADUKRO
Image

I installed them at about those position (of course, not outside) I removed the plastic covers to stick the pads directly to the battery case:
Image
Image

Here is an other view:
Image

And this. The thermal switch is between the body and the lower plastic undercover (in front of the battery):
Image

Maybe the best image is:
Image

The pad are glued with the sticky side, added some silicon around the pad. I a rectangle of pink fiberglass about 2 cm thick (not compressed) and covered with aluminum tape to cover each pad.

I left the 120 volt plug under the hood. So to connect the heat pads, I connect the car like a gas car: open the hood, connect to the house 120volt outlet and close the hood for the night

The result is:
- Even if connected, above -18C, the pads do not turn On
- At -18C they turn On.
Next is an example for a -27C night and -19C day
- The Thermal switch get heat from being near the battery pack
- In the morning, the pack shows 4 temperature bars
- After the work day, it goes down to 2 bars
- As I drive home, it goes up to 3 bars
- I connect the pads at home and the next morning, it get 4 bars again
- If the temps are above -18, all is like any other day. No heat but I charge at 100%

Next spring, I will set the 120 plug in the front electrical trap, not to have to open the Hood everytime.

My experience is that this is better than the Winter Package. My battery being at a higher temp, I can go farther in really cold days like -20C then I can at warmer temp like -15C

P.S.
-12C is 10F
-15C is 5F
-18C is 0F
-20C is -4F
-27C is -17F

Re: 2011 battery pack heat pads installation

Posted: Sat Jan 25, 2014 12:49 pm
by Yvesm
Having one pad left, I redid a sample install:

Fiberglass insulation, aluminum tape and pad:
Image

The material:
Image

Once glues and taped:
Image

The 120 volts input:
Image

Today, -21C (or -6F) and the battery is warm at 4 bars, guess-0meter at 98 km (or about 60 miles):
Image

Re: Battery pack heat pads installation

Posted: Fri May 23, 2014 5:31 am
by tivollix
Thank you very much for posting these details. I may do the same installation in case we have another harsh winter.

Questions:

1/ Was it easy to remove the plastic battery cover?

2/ What is the maximum temperature of the pad or near the pad? I am concerned with a too big temperature gradient or by battery sensors beeing "fooled" by the heat pad.

Re: Battery pack heat pads installation

Posted: Fri May 23, 2014 7:33 am
by BrockWI
I was thinking about doing something like this as well. My concern would be heating the cells on the inside adjacent to the pad up to much. I was thinking of using the battery warmer ones with a larger surface area http://www.amazon.com/Kats-22200-Watt-B ... ZAR3R3NV5V" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; If I recall correctly those max out at about 75F or 24C I know it would be more difficult to mount them and insulate under them, but I like the idea of lower temps. I am also not sure if they would hold up as well over time.

Thoughts?

Re: Battery pack heat pads installation

Posted: Thu Oct 16, 2014 9:02 pm
by Yvesm
Sorry for late reply.
It is easy to remove the plastic battery covers. Bolts all around.
Heat dissipates on the metal battery casing. Casing not hot when they activate. But they do activate at low temp of 0F. And shuts down at 10F. I never tried at summer temps.
You can try a air dryer of 1500 watts at 0F and you will not see hot air comming out of it. Now these pads add up to 300 wats on a large surface.
I think that a larger battery warmer could isolate the pack in summer and make the temp rize. I chose not to used large one to keep cooling air effect in summer.
The heat from pads in winter temps really dissipates well and slowly to entire pack.

Re: Battery pack heat pads installation

Posted: Fri Oct 17, 2014 5:14 am
by tivollix
Thank you for the reply!

Yvesm wrote:Sorry for late reply.
It is easy to remove the plastic battery covers. Bolts all around.
Heat dissipates on the metal battery casing. Casing not hot when they activate. But they do activate at low temp of 0F. And shuts down at 10F. I never tried at summer temps.
You can try a air dryer of 1500 watts at 0F and you will not see hot air comming out of it. Now these pads add up to 300 wats on a large surface.
I think that a larger battery warmer could isolate the pack in summer and make the temp rize. I chose not to used large one to keep cooling air effect in summer.
The heat from pads in winter temps really dissipates well and slowly to entire pack.

Re: Battery pack heat pads installation

Posted: Tue Oct 21, 2014 4:59 pm
by Yvesm
I am from Laval. If you do this and need help. Let me know

Re: Battery pack heat pads installation

Posted: Tue Mar 31, 2015 12:14 am
by nerys
I really like this!!! very intrigued! do they have these heaters that can run off 240v ? maybe we can tap into power directly from the EVSE so both get power when you plug in the car with the normal 240v evse ??

Re: Battery pack heat pads installation

Posted: Tue Mar 31, 2015 8:36 am
by keydiver
I'm sure that 230/240 VAC heaters are available for international use, but the problem with that would be that as soon as charging stops, the heaters would no longer have power either.

Re: Battery pack heat pads installation

Posted: Tue Mar 31, 2015 12:40 pm
by Nubo
Makes a lot of sense. Curious as to how much energy this consumes. Have you tried measuring the electrical consumption over the course of a cold night?