WetEV
Posts: 3745
Joined: Fri May 04, 2012 8:25 am
Delivery Date: 16 Feb 2014
Location: Near Seattle, WA

Re: 2019 "60 kWh" Leaf e-Plus

Wed Jun 03, 2020 7:05 am

DaveinOlyWA wrote:
Wed Jun 03, 2020 6:55 am
To make a LONG story short. The ideology that charging habits or temperature will significantly change the usable capacity of the pack is simply not possible.
Temperature does temporarily change the usable capacity of the pack. The battery stores less energy when cold, and more when hot. If you do a recharge capacity test, make sure you do it at the same temperature every year.


https://batteryuniversity.com/index.php ... mperatures

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WetEV
#49
Most everything around here is wet during the rainy season. And the rainy season is long.
2012 Leaf SL Red (Totaled)
2014 Leaf SL Red
2019 eTron Blue

DaveinOlyWA
Posts: 14815
Joined: Sat Apr 24, 2010 7:43 pm
Delivery Date: 16 Nov 2019
Leaf Number: 319862
Location: Olympia, WA
Contact: Website

Re: 2019 "60 kWh" Leaf e-Plus

Wed Jun 03, 2020 1:33 pm

Yes there is that and brings up the age old question; if I warm the battery up am I charging it?

The answer is obviously no but a warmer battery provides more energy so... 8-)
2011 SL; 44,598 mi, 87% SOH. 2013 S; 44,840 mi, 91% SOH. 2016 S30; 29,413 mi, 99% SOH. 2018 S; 25,185 mi, SOH 92.23%. 2019 S Plus; 10,081 mi, 95.03% SOH
My Blog; http://daveinolywa.blogspot.com" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

DougWantsALeaf
Posts: 1674
Joined: Fri May 10, 2013 8:21 pm
Delivery Date: 18 May 2013
Leaf Number: 407811
Location: Chicago North Side

Re: 2019 "60 kWh" Leaf e-Plus

Fri Jun 05, 2020 9:15 am

I am just hoping that the quarterly reductions will be coming to an end, and the car moves into the flattened part of the curve.

anyone notice whehter the car charges more fully using L1 vs. L2 charging? Sometimes I have seen the GID level post level 2 charging to 100% stop significantly shorter than with L1. I don't have alot of great data to support, just anecdotal. I don't know if L1 charging allows for better time for the battery to balance.
2019 S Plus (98.6% SOH) & 2019 SV Plus (94.6% SOH) Both Silver
2013 Leaf SV sold 2019
100 Mile Club Member (Number 87)
Max Miles on 13 Leaf: 120 miles
Max Miles on 19 SV Leaf: 242 Highway 4.5 miles/kWh

DougWantsALeaf
Posts: 1674
Joined: Fri May 10, 2013 8:21 pm
Delivery Date: 18 May 2013
Leaf Number: 407811
Location: Chicago North Side

Re: 2019 "60 kWh" Leaf e-Plus

Fri Jun 05, 2020 12:06 pm

Leaf continues to prove its super safe. I wonder where the model 3 shows up in the deaths per million miles.

https://www.torquenews.com/1083/volkswa ... small-cars
2019 S Plus (98.6% SOH) & 2019 SV Plus (94.6% SOH) Both Silver
2013 Leaf SV sold 2019
100 Mile Club Member (Number 87)
Max Miles on 13 Leaf: 120 miles
Max Miles on 19 SV Leaf: 242 Highway 4.5 miles/kWh

salyavin
Posts: 111
Joined: Thu Sep 26, 2019 9:51 pm
Delivery Date: 30 Dec 2019
Leaf Number: 318726
Location: Littleton , CO

Re: 2019 "60 kWh" Leaf e-Plus

Fri Jun 05, 2020 2:15 pm

I bet Tesla is pretty high. The rare battery fire is not a huge thing (none in Leaf that I know about), I'd say most of it for Tesla is people using the self driving inappropriately.

GerryAZ
Gold Member
Posts: 2490
Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2010 6:47 pm
Delivery Date: 12 Jun 2011
Location: Phoenix, AZ

Re: 2019 "60 kWh" Leaf e-Plus

Fri Jun 05, 2020 9:22 pm

DougWantsALeaf wrote:
Fri Jun 05, 2020 12:06 pm
Leaf continues to prove its super safe. I wonder where the model 3 shows up in the deaths per million miles.

https://www.torquenews.com/1083/volkswa ... small-cars
I am not surprised by the results for LEAF. The LEAF is classed as a midsize car and it is much heavier than the average midsize car. The weight distribution is balanced front/rear and side/side which helps with handling and braking to avoid crashes. Also, the large battery mass is directly under the passenger compartment so crash forces are absorbed by sheet metal rather than violently accelerating the passenger compartment. I was amazed how well the 2011 performed when it was rear-ended by a 3/4-ton 4X4 diesel pickup while I was stopped at a traffic light. The back of the LEAF and the front of the pickup absorbed a lot of energy, but I did not feel significant crash force acceleration.

Since weight distribution and overall size are similar, I would expect the Tesla Model 3 to perform well in real world crashes and crash avoidance. The battery mass under the passenger compartment helps in real world crashes, but penalizes EV's during crash testing into fixed barriers.
Gerry
Silver LEAF 2011 SL rear ended (totaled) by in-attentive driver 1/4/2015 at 50,422 miles
Silver LEAF 2015 SL purchased 2/7/2015; traded 8/10/2019 at 82,436 miles
White LEAF 2019 SL Plus purchased 8/10/2019

DaveinOlyWA
Posts: 14815
Joined: Sat Apr 24, 2010 7:43 pm
Delivery Date: 16 Nov 2019
Leaf Number: 319862
Location: Olympia, WA
Contact: Website

Re: 2019 "60 kWh" Leaf e-Plus

Sat Jun 06, 2020 6:53 am

salyavin wrote:
Fri Jun 05, 2020 2:15 pm
I bet Tesla is pretty high. The rare battery fire is not a huge thing (none in Leaf that I know about), I'd say most of it for Tesla is people using the self driving inappropriately.
Not high at all actually. One thing we have to accept that even when abusing self driving, it is still safer than we are. ;)
2011 SL; 44,598 mi, 87% SOH. 2013 S; 44,840 mi, 91% SOH. 2016 S30; 29,413 mi, 99% SOH. 2018 S; 25,185 mi, SOH 92.23%. 2019 S Plus; 10,081 mi, 95.03% SOH
My Blog; http://daveinolywa.blogspot.com" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

WetEV
Posts: 3745
Joined: Fri May 04, 2012 8:25 am
Delivery Date: 16 Feb 2014
Location: Near Seattle, WA

Re: 2019 "60 kWh" Leaf e-Plus

Sat Jun 06, 2020 7:03 am

GerryAZ wrote:
Fri Jun 05, 2020 9:22 pm
I am not surprised by the results for LEAF. The LEAF is classed as a midsize car and it is much heavier than the average midsize car. The weight distribution is balanced front/rear and side/side which helps with handling and braking to avoid crashes. Also, the large battery mass is directly under the passenger compartment so crash forces are absorbed by sheet metal rather than violently accelerating the passenger compartment. I was amazed how well the 2011 performed when it was rear-ended by a 3/4-ton 4X4 diesel pickup while I was stopped at a traffic light. The back of the LEAF and the front of the pickup absorbed a lot of energy, but I did not feel significant crash force acceleration.
Having been rear-ended by a car going fairly fast, I'm also not surprised. I did feel significant acceleration, but it was smooth. Nothing hurt, then or later.
WetEV
#49
Most everything around here is wet during the rainy season. And the rainy season is long.
2012 Leaf SL Red (Totaled)
2014 Leaf SL Red
2019 eTron Blue

salyavin
Posts: 111
Joined: Thu Sep 26, 2019 9:51 pm
Delivery Date: 30 Dec 2019
Leaf Number: 318726
Location: Littleton , CO

Re: 2019 "60 kWh" Leaf e-Plus

Sat Jun 06, 2020 7:11 am

Sorry by high, I mean a high safety ranking, not dangerous.
DaveinOlyWA wrote:
Sat Jun 06, 2020 6:53 am
salyavin wrote:
Fri Jun 05, 2020 2:15 pm
I bet Tesla is pretty high. The rare battery fire is not a huge thing (none in Leaf that I know about), I'd say most of it for Tesla is people using the self driving inappropriately.
Not high at all actually. One thing we have to accept that even when abusing self driving, it is still safer than we are. ;)

DaveinOlyWA
Posts: 14815
Joined: Sat Apr 24, 2010 7:43 pm
Delivery Date: 16 Nov 2019
Leaf Number: 319862
Location: Olympia, WA
Contact: Website

Re: 2019 "60 kWh" Leaf e-Plus

Sat Jun 06, 2020 7:12 am

GerryAZ wrote:
Fri Jun 05, 2020 9:22 pm
DougWantsALeaf wrote:
Fri Jun 05, 2020 12:06 pm
Leaf continues to prove its super safe. I wonder where the model 3 shows up in the deaths per million miles.

https://www.torquenews.com/1083/volkswa ... small-cars
I am not surprised by the results for LEAF. The LEAF is classed as a midsize car and it is much heavier than the average midsize car. The weight distribution is balanced front/rear and side/side which helps with handling and braking to avoid crashes. Also, the large battery mass is directly under the passenger compartment so crash forces are absorbed by sheet metal rather than violently accelerating the passenger compartment. I was amazed how well the 2011 performed when it was rear-ended by a 3/4-ton 4X4 diesel pickup while I was stopped at a traffic light. The back of the LEAF and the front of the pickup absorbed a lot of energy, but I did not feel significant crash force acceleration.

Since weight distribution and overall size are similar, I would expect the Tesla Model 3 to perform well in real world crashes and crash avoidance. The battery mass under the passenger compartment helps in real world crashes, but penalizes EV's during crash testing into fixed barriers.
To add to crashworthiness; If you didn't read the blog, just look at the pix. I was t boned by a large car doing 40+ mph with the initial impact directly on the drivers door. I walked away literally w/o a scratch. (I worked a 10½ shift less than 30 hours later)

What I realized is the extra bracing for the battery pack not only protects the pack but it also protected me. Despite "extensive" exterior damage, the inside damage (minus the air bags) was ZERO.

IOW; side collisions have no crumple zones (which is a VERY good thing!) with the impact shoving me sideways until I hit the curb (the wheel on that side was destroyed) This forced the intruding car to pivot sideways with our cars ending up side by side facing opposite directions. I was literally 5 feet from the other driver.

https://daveinolywa.blogspot.com/2018/0 ... e-all.html
2011 SL; 44,598 mi, 87% SOH. 2013 S; 44,840 mi, 91% SOH. 2016 S30; 29,413 mi, 99% SOH. 2018 S; 25,185 mi, SOH 92.23%. 2019 S Plus; 10,081 mi, 95.03% SOH
My Blog; http://daveinolywa.blogspot.com" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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