mitrals
Posts: 61
Joined: Tue Aug 18, 2015 11:03 am
Delivery Date: 15 Jun 2019
Location: Chicago IL

Re: How is Leaf on snowy hills

Thu Sep 26, 2019 4:53 am

The concept of awd is overrated in urban settings. Living in Chicago and Canada, I can personally vouch that winter tires are the best option to have. Accidents do not happen mainly because you couldn't accelerate fast enough, it's usually you couldn't stop or skid off the road. Best option is an awd with winter tires. However I would take a fwd with winter tires over any awd with all season tires
2012 Leaf SL. 9 Bars 50K miles - 06/15/2019 - Daily driver
2018 Honda Clarity Plug in Touring- Bought 04/26/19 - Daily driver

Previous electric cars:
2013 Leaf SV. Bought with 11 bars and 4K miles.
2013 Cmax Energi.
2013 Fusion Energi Titanium.

powersurge
Posts: 1503
Joined: Wed Oct 21, 2015 10:24 am
Delivery Date: 06 Dec 2014
Location: Long Island, NY

Re: How is Leaf on snowy hills

Thu Sep 26, 2019 6:47 am

LeftieBiker wrote:
Wed Sep 25, 2019 12:15 pm
css28 wrote:
Wed Sep 25, 2019 10:34 am
powersurge wrote:
Wed Sep 25, 2019 10:07 am
...If any front wheel drive can do it, then the Leaf can.. BUT you cannot expect a Leaf to use snow tires... It is counter to the idea of an EV.
I couldn't disagree more strongly. There are some excellent LRR winter tires available these days. I can vouch for the Michelin X-Ice xi3 tires. They have resulted in no lower fuel mileage (this would equate to battery range) than the current all season tires out there.

The post by powersurge is presenting incorrect information. There is NO inherent incompatibility between EVs and snow tires.

Like I said before, this question is not really about if the Leaf will be good up hill, but would any 2WD car do the job for the original question? Of course - you can put on any tires you like...

My comment was that in general EVs and snow tires are not put together due to the higher drag of the tires. If you know of a particular product that I am not familiar with, then I am open to education....

I hate being told that I am always giving incorrect information...

SageBrush
Posts: 4907
Joined: Sun Mar 06, 2011 2:28 am
Delivery Date: 13 Feb 2017
Location: NM

Re: How is Leaf on snowy hills

Thu Sep 26, 2019 7:39 am

powersurge wrote:
Wed Sep 25, 2019 10:07 am
BUT you cannot expect a Leaf to use snow tires...
Nonsense

OP:
A good winter tyre has about twice the grip of an all-season tyre so in terms of traction going up a hill a FWD with snow tyres is about equivalent to an AWD with all-season tyres. If you require AWD and winter tyres to go up your hill then the LEAF would probably fail at the task.
2013 LEAF 'S' Model with QC & rear-view camera
Bought off-lease Jan 2017 from N. California
Two years in Colorado, now in NM
03/2018: 58 Ahr, 28k miles
11/2018: 56.16 Ahr, 30k miles
-----
2018 Tesla Model 3 LR, Delivered 6/2018

SageBrush
Posts: 4907
Joined: Sun Mar 06, 2011 2:28 am
Delivery Date: 13 Feb 2017
Location: NM

Re: How is Leaf on snowy hills

Thu Sep 26, 2019 7:45 am

mitrals wrote:
Thu Sep 26, 2019 4:53 am
The concept of awd is overrated in urban settings. Living in Chicago and Canada, I can personally vouch that winter tires are the best option to have. Accidents do not happen mainly because you couldn't accelerate fast enough, it's usually you couldn't stop or skid off the road. Best option is an awd with winter tires. However I would take a fwd with winter tires over any awd with all season tires
Exactly. I try to remind people that all cars are 4WB: four-wheel brakes. The difference is the tyres
2013 LEAF 'S' Model with QC & rear-view camera
Bought off-lease Jan 2017 from N. California
Two years in Colorado, now in NM
03/2018: 58 Ahr, 28k miles
11/2018: 56.16 Ahr, 30k miles
-----
2018 Tesla Model 3 LR, Delivered 6/2018

SageBrush
Posts: 4907
Joined: Sun Mar 06, 2011 2:28 am
Delivery Date: 13 Feb 2017
Location: NM

Re: How is Leaf on snowy hills

Thu Sep 26, 2019 7:46 am

powersurge wrote:
Thu Sep 26, 2019 6:47 am
I hate being told that I am always giving incorrect information...
.
Then stop.
Or in your case, stop posting
2013 LEAF 'S' Model with QC & rear-view camera
Bought off-lease Jan 2017 from N. California
Two years in Colorado, now in NM
03/2018: 58 Ahr, 28k miles
11/2018: 56.16 Ahr, 30k miles
-----
2018 Tesla Model 3 LR, Delivered 6/2018

WetEV
Posts: 3158
Joined: Fri May 04, 2012 8:25 am
Delivery Date: 16 Feb 2014
Location: Near Seattle, WA

Re: How is Leaf on snowy hills

Thu Sep 26, 2019 7:50 am

SageBrush wrote:
Thu Sep 26, 2019 7:45 am
Exactly. I try to remind people that all cars are 4WB: four-wheel brakes. The difference is the tyres
Almost all cars are TWS. Two wheel steering.

AWD helps you to start and keep moving. Doesn't help you to stop, doesn't help you keep in control, doesn't help you turn.
WetEV
#49
Most everything around here is wet during the rainy season. And the rainy season is long.
2012 Leaf SL Red (Totaled)
2014 Leaf SL Red
2019 eTron Blue

DaveinOlyWA
Posts: 14160
Joined: Sat Apr 24, 2010 7:43 pm
Delivery Date: 16 Nov 2019
Leaf Number: 319862
Location: Olympia, WA
Contact: Website

Re: How is Leaf on snowy hills

Thu Sep 26, 2019 8:30 am

jct974 wrote:
Tue Sep 24, 2019 3:18 pm
Hello,
I am considering purchasing a new Leaf . I live in Rhode Island and live at the top of a steep hill. I am used to buying AWDs due to this issue, and really would like to consider a new Leaf but not sure if it can do the job of getting up and down the hill in snow and ice. Does anyone have any thoughts if a Leaf can handle a steep snowy hill? Any information that people can provide would be greatly appreciated. :D
W/O assistance; VERY bad. But any EV has ultra fine motor control which helps so good snow tires or even Tire socks (which I use since snow is not very common here said after worst Winter in 30+ years of WA rain...)

So it doesn't really take a lot. Would be better if batteries were in the front though.
2011 SL; 44,598 miles. 2013 S; 44,840 miles.2016 S30 deceased. 29,413 miles. 2018 S40; 25,185 miles SOH 92.23%
My Blog; http://daveinolywa.blogspot.com" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

jjeff
Posts: 1951
Joined: Wed Jan 13, 2016 9:10 am
Delivery Date: 13 Jul 2014
Leaf Number: 422121
Location: MSP MN

Re: How is Leaf on snowy hills

Thu Sep 26, 2019 4:11 pm

So does anyone have a suggestion for a good all weather tire? one I could leave on in the summer, preferably one with not too much of a RR hit but I know some would be inevitable over the Ecopias.
Like almost everyone else seems to be saying, the Leaf actually isn't a bad winter weather car(due to it's weight I'd suspect) but the stock Ecopia tires leave something to be desired. Of course it could be worse, my '12 came from CA and came with nice looking almost new tires. Unfortunatly I didn't realize they were summer tires, not all season but true summer tires! OMG they handled like crap in the snow, couldn't even make it up a slight incline and steering and stopping in the snow was almost non-existent. Needless to say this winter I HAVE to replace them. I've toyed with the X-ice 3 Michelin which I've read have quite good LRR and swapping with the summer tires but then I'd have to spend roughly $80/year for tire swap-outs and I don't really want to purchase separate rims, etc. The other option would be better than Ecopia all weather(better than all seasons I've been told??) and just ditch the summer tires(50% worn??). Truthfully our '13 had Ecopia's originally and I replaced them with Ecopia+'s(after only 20k and they were basically bald :x ) and it's "ok" in the snow but there was a couple times last year we couldn't make out our culdesac's slight incline so I'd really like something better. I did purchase some snow chains(more like springs) off Amazon($30) but truthfully the last thing I want to do when it's snowy and yucky out is to crawl on the ground and put on chains, then probably have to remove them a mile later when getting on the bare freeway, naa better tires are probably the ticket.
I was talking with someone in ON CA(Ontario Canada not Ontario Cal) who said all-season tires were illegal to use in the winter :shock: to be in compliance you either had to use winter tires or studs(which they did, fiberglass I believe). I thought that was kind of extreme but I suppose many of the roads were in little populated areas and the OPP didn't want people running off the road or causing accidents.....
2012 SL purchased used 2/'16
2013 S w/QC purchased new
Juicebox Premium 60a L1/L2 EVSE, Ebusbar 16a L1/L2 EVSE
'12 EVSEupgrade'd 20a L1/L2 EVSE, '13 EVSEupgrade'd adjustable 6-20a L2, 6-13a L1 EVSE
Zencar 13, 20, 30a L1/L2 portable EVSE
GE Durastation 30a

JayCan
Posts: 7
Joined: Tue Aug 27, 2019 5:14 am
Delivery Date: 22 Aug 2019
Location: Ontario Canada

Re: How is Leaf on snowy hills

Tue Oct 01, 2019 11:15 am

I live in Kingston ON Canada now but have lived across Canada including both coasts and central/northern areas. I grew up in Manitoba just north of you.
The only province that has mandatory snow tire regulations is Quebec. However, most everyone who drives 2-wheel drive cars in winter conditions installs winter tires if doing a fair bit of city driving. The tires with a winter rating are identified by a snowflake in a mountain-like triangle. The rubber compound is soft so will adhere better in cold, icy conditions. Because the rubber is quite soft, they wear quickly in warm conditions. Most people don't install them until temps don't go above 10C (50F) and take them off early in the spring. Usually, you have a cheap set of alloys or steel rims with the winter tires mounted and not worry about the TPS for the several months you have them on. Popular brands are Michelin Ice-X or Bridgestone Blizzak, but almost every manufacturer makes a winter type.
Mud and Snow (M+S marking) are a good option if you don't get temperatures too much below freezing but want good traction. I have used them on trucks and SUVs before and you can use them year round. They don't have the soft compound, but have a more aggressive pattern for snow. The downside is they have more road noise.
Check local laws for the use of studs in tires. Central and southern Ontario does not allow studs (they are hard on the roads) but northern areas that have less population and are colder and get more snow are allowed to use studs. It differs by area/province. I have used studded snow tires before and they do provide better traction but are NOISY.
There are cheaper brands than the Michelins. I'm trying Sailun Ice Blazer WST1s because of lots of good reviews. Yes, I am swapping out my rims and tires twice a year, but I can do that myself.

Hope this helps!
'15 SL 40k kms, 12 bars

LeftieBiker
Moderator
Posts: 13300
Joined: Wed May 22, 2013 3:17 am
Delivery Date: 30 Apr 2018
Location: Upstate New York, US

Re: How is Leaf on snowy hills

Tue Oct 01, 2019 12:12 pm

We have the Toyo Celsius on the PIP as I've mentioned before. It is a 4 season Winter tire, meaning it is essentially a Winter-biased all-season tire. It is good in snow and the only issue I've had with it is the car's steering doesn't want to self-center any more with them on all 4 wheels. It doesn't resist being centered manually, it just doesn't do it by itself.
Scarlet Ember 2018 Leaf SL W/ Pro Pilot
2009 Vectrix VX-1 W/18 Leaf modules, & 3 EZIP E-bicycles.
BAFX OBDII Dongle
PLEASE don't PM me with Leaf questions. Just post in the topic that seems most appropriate.

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