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National Electric Code Article 625 for EVSE

Posted: Mon Jun 28, 2010 11:34 pm
by pgrovetom

Re: National Electric Code Article 625 for EVSE

Posted: Tue Jun 29, 2010 12:51 am
by planet4ever
Well, at first blush that seems to provide a firm answer to one hotly debated topic:
Electric vehicle supply equipment rated at 125 volts, single phase, 15 or 20 amperes or part of a system identified and listed as suitable for the purpose and meeting the requirements of 625.18, 625.19, and 625.29 shall be permitted to be cord-and-plug-connected. All other electric vehicle supply equipment shall be permanently connected and fastened in place.
But that second "or" in the first sentence is bothersome. Subsections 18 and 19 appear to say that only 125v, 15A or 20A can be plug connected, but I didn't see anything about that in subsection 29. Besides, what is the point of identifying those three subsections if they don't enlarge the class of EVSEs allowed to be plug connected?

Re: National Electric Code Article 625 for EVSE

Posted: Tue Jun 29, 2010 1:08 am
by AndyH
Yeah, we've talked about this before on the forum. That's the 2008 code;, so not* the latest.

The SAE, UL, and EVSE manufacturers are working from the latest code and are all uniform in their admonishment that while 120V EVSE can be portable, 240V cannot. Legally.

*Thanks drees. NEC is on a 3-year cycle, not 2. http://www.nfpa.org/aboutthecodes/About ... ?DocNum=70

Re: National Electric Code Article 625 for EVSE

Posted: Tue Jun 29, 2010 10:14 am
by johnr
That's as clear as can be - no portable 240V plugging in. So, the question is, how does Tesla get away with it?

And, can Leaf owners work around this requirement by carrying around some sort of electrical adapter box that's permanently connected to a miniature level 2 charger? People are plugging in their motor homes to 240V outlets at campgrounds all the time. Of course they're not electric vehicles. But, if someone were to plug in their motorhome to a 240V outlet at a campground and the motorhome happened to have an EVSE wired to it, then one could legally charge their Leaf that way. So, maybe there's a way to do this without towing a motorhome behind Leaf :lol: .

Re: National Electric Code Article 625 for EVSE

Posted: Tue Jun 29, 2010 11:38 am
by garygid
I read 625.13, etc., and it appears that neither 625.18 nor 625.19 prohibit 240v plug-in connections.

They say that a 120v system can be made without some of the specified interlocks, but that other systems (like 240v) are required to have the interlocks specified in those sections.

625.29 is for indoor (not outdoor) sites.

If the EVSE is indoors, and the car is outdoors, it is not clear if that is an "indoor" site, but it would appear (to me) that the EVSE is indeed at an indoor site.

Re: National Electric Code Article 625 for EVSE

Posted: Tue Jun 29, 2010 11:47 am
by DaveEV
AndyH wrote:Yeah, we've talked about this before on the forum. That's the 2008 code, so not the latest.
2008 NEC is the latest. The next revision isn't due until next year.

Either way, your local jurisdiction has the final say and will often deviate from the NEC - the NEC is primarily used as a guide and starting point for most regulations.

Re: National Electric Code Article 625 for EVSE

Posted: Tue Jun 29, 2010 11:58 am
by garygid
Also, many states, like CA, are at least several years behind in adopting the NEC, and often make some changes when they do "adopt".

Then, local regulations and "preferences" (and the "interpretations" of individual inspectors) also come into play.

Re: National Electric Code Article 625 for EVSE

Posted: Tue Jun 29, 2010 12:05 pm
by evnow
While this is all true - UL certification matters - even though it is a private company. They go by NEC.

Re: National Electric Code Article 625 for EVSE

Posted: Tue Jun 29, 2010 12:13 pm
by garygid
So, since the 2008 NEC clearly allows indoor-use plug-in 240v EVSEs, why don't we have any?

Re: National Electric Code Article 625 for EVSE

Posted: Tue Jun 29, 2010 12:24 pm
by garygid
Do I need to design and build an indoor-use, plug-in 240v EVSE, with switchable charge rates (up to perhaps 50 amps), and an easy-detach cable as a strain relief, and get it UL "listed" for indoor use only?

And then a set of break-away J1772 fuel-plug cables, 10 to 50 feet long, and have then indoor/outdoor UL listed?

Is the market too small?

Am I the only one thinking that a socket at home, a "covered" socket at work, and another socket at my friends home would give me a LOT of added use from my EV?