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paulgipe
Posts: 370
Joined: Sat Aug 02, 2014 4:23 pm
Delivery Date: 20 Oct 2014
Leaf Number: 311200
Location: Bakersfield, CA 93305
Contact: Website

Trip Report: Bakersfield to Tehachapi, California

Mon Feb 23, 2015 11:31 am

On February 15 we drove our Leaf to Tehachapi from Bakersfield, California.

We’d been planning this trip for some time. The Friday before, we had driven our Prius to Tehachapi to talk to the owners of the Mountain Valley Airport and RV Park about charging the Leaf once we got there.

There’s no public charging between Bakersfield and Mojave. It was a blank spot on http://www.Plugshare.com" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;. If we could make it to Tehachapi and charge at the RV park, we could open another route, albeit 30 miles longer, from the San Joaquin Valley to the Los Angeles Basin.

While one can over-think something like this, a trip from Bakersfield to Tehachapi in a Nissan Leaf for a newbie to EVs does call for caution. We’ve only had the car for some three months and the farthest we’ve driven was 25 miles with a modest climb of 2,000 feet.

Pioneers like San Diego’s Tony Williams have driven Leafs places few thought possible. Others too have pushed the boundary. John Rowell (aka JohnR) drove his Leaf all the way to the end of the road in Mineral King Valley of Sequoia National Park from his home in Exeter—and back. That was no small feat. He followed that with a trip up to Camp Nelson, also in the Sierras. Dave Laur in Olympia, Washington, and Randy in Fresno have all documented their road trips in Leafs. There are many others, those who've taken their Leafs up to Lassen National Park, and to Lake Arrowhead and Big Bear.

To my knowledge, however, no one had gone over the Tehachapi Pass from the San Joaquin Valley in a Leaf. If they have, they haven’t reported it.

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It’s easy enough to find the distance to the RV Park at the glider port. And it’s easy enough to estimate what the Leaf will do on level ground. Drivers of Leafs do these kinds of calculations every day in their heads.

Getting up the mountain was something altogether different. That was the rub.

I turned to two sources for estimating what it would take to get to Tehachapi: the Nissan Leaf Range Chart by Tony Williams, and EV Trip Planner, an online estimator.

Williams assumes that 1 fuel bar is used for every 1,000 feet of elevation gain. His chart also gives estimated consumption at various constant speeds driving on the level.

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EV Trip Planner was designed for Teslas, but they have a beta test for estimating the Leaf’s energy consumption. Their calculations are all hidden behind a screen, but they allow you to print to a spreadsheet so you can see their assumptions on speed and elevation and their conclusions by route segment.

Using both systems, I estimated we should arrive with about 20% State of Charge (SOC) remaining or about two fuel bars if we drove conservatively.

Note that the number of kWh and bars consumed varies with the assumptions used. These are only approximations.

I topped up our Leaf before we departed, a technique others have used to maximize the charge in the traction batteries.

We set out mid-morning in Eco Mode and we drove very conservatively. (I had visions of being stopped alongside the road with tractor-trailers roaring past as AAA tried to pick up our Leaf from the emergency lane.)

This isn’t our normal style. The Leaf is fun to drive—once you turn Eco Mode off—and we’d usually drive faster. When I was commuting to Tehachapi, I’d typically find myself in the left lane passing the trucks as they ground up the hill in low gear.

We drove the first 15 miles on surface streets as we do normally for the trip to Tehachapi. On this leg it was easy to keep the speed under 45 mph.

Then we had to enter Hwy 58, the main route over the pass, and the fun began. The route isn’t one long ascent. There are several descents mixed in just to make it interesting when you’re trying to pace yourself with the truck traffic.

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All told, we would need to climb nearly 4,200 feet over 35 miles to reach the summit.

At the first significant grade, mile 20, we got behind a truck and followed it. The intent was to let the speed drop to that of the truck as it crawls up the mountain, extending our range. Another advantage is that most drivers can easily see a big rig in the slow lane and will change lanes to avoid it, lessening the risk of being rear-ended.

For the most part, this worked fine. Occasionally it was necessary to enter the fast lane and pass a truck that was crawling along. In one instance the truck driver misinterpreted what we were doing and moved into the passing lane so we could pass on the right. It didn’t make sense, but we took the hint and sped ahead.

We passed the halfway point, and then the three-quarters mark where the grade began to lessen. Then we closed on the last segment before entering the Tehachapi Valley. It looked like we’d make it with capacity to spare.

We pulled into the glider port on the south side of Tehachapi just off Highline Road with 30% State of Charge, and when we reached the RV park it dropped to 29%.

For an EV with 21 kWh of usable storage, we consumed nearly 15 kWh for the trip to Mountain Valley RV Park. We had four fuel bars left on the “gas” gauge. We’d done better than either estimate, but that could have been the result of driving so conservatively.

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We checked in, took our portable EVSE Upgrade out of the trunk, and plugged it in to the NEMA 14-50 receptacle at the campsite’s electrical hookup.

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The pedestal also has a TT-30 receptacle, but we planned to charge at 240 volts. The EVSE Upgrade pulls 16 amps to charge the Leaf at more than 3 kW. So we’d gain about 3 kWh for every hour of charging.

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We had lunch at the Raven’s Nest, and enjoyed the sunshine, clear air, and springtime weather while charging for three hours. That gave us more than enough to make it back to Bakersfield.

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It was a gorgeous day and we took the time to watch the gliders taking off and landing.

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The weather was so nice, it was difficult to leave. We paid our $10 to charge and packed up. In the three hours we’d raised our charge from 29% to 88%. This raised the fuel bars from four to nine.

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The trip down was uneventful. We had plenty of charge so we kept with traffic. The day had gone so well that we stopped off and took in a folk music concert on the way back. When we got home we had 49% State of Charge and six fuel bars remaining.

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While our consumption on the trip up was more conservative than either estimate, our more aggressive driving on the way down put us much closer to our projections.

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The trip was a success. From the glider port it’s about 50 miles to the Antelope Valley Nissan’s DC quick charger. From there, it should be a routine drive of 55 miles into the LA Basin on an 80% charge.

This opens a new door to Los Angeles. The previous route down Hwy 99 or I-5 over the “Grapevine” necessitates charging at a truck stop near Frazier Park, not the most pleasant place to spend several hours before going over the summit. Once on the other side of the Tejon Pass it’s necessary to stop at the L2 chargers in Valencia. There are no DC quick chargers on this route until the LA area, not even at the Nissan dealer.

We put Mountain Valley RV Park on Plugshare. Jane and Larry Barrett would be happy to entertain more EV drivers crossing the Tehachapi Pass.

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We’re going to try this route again at more normal speeds and measure the consumption. Then we’ll try it with the Eco Mode off and see how we do. Finally, we'll try the whole route to Los Angeles.

If someone has done this route already, please let me know. We’re organizing here in Bakersfield to get either some L2 stations or better yet a DCQC station.

This article also appears in an edited form on my web site http://www.wind-works.org" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; under News & Articles on Electric Vehicles.
Bakersfield, California
2017 Bolt LT with DCFC, leased 11/09/17
2015 Nissan S with QC, leased, returned
2013 Chevy Volt Premium, used 10/3/16, sold
http://www.wind-works.org

mbender
Posts: 824
Joined: Sun Apr 21, 2013 8:11 am
Delivery Date: 31 Aug 2014
Leaf Number: 309606
Location: The Great California Delta, and environs

Re: Trip Report: Bakersfield to Tehachapi, California

Mon Feb 23, 2015 3:25 pm

Thank you for the write-up. I hope to make the trip to LA sometime this year and will probably go this route.

A few "simple" questions:
  1. With a full 'tank' and consistently conservative driving, do you think you could make it from Bakersfield to Antelope Valley Nissan without stopping (to charge) in Tehachapi at all? With 24 miles left in Tehachapi and downhill much of the way, it seems that it might just be possible.
  2. And if not to all the way to Palmdale, then maybe to Lancaster, ~10 miles earlier? Plugshare now shows a quick charger at the Museum of Art and History there.
  3. You mention trying to get a DCQC in Bakersfield. Here too, there is one listed on Plugshare, at Bakersfield Nissan. Did you mean more DCQCs, or is the one at Bakersfield unreliable and/or inaccessible at times that you would make this trip?
Otherwise, great info. I'm hoping that EVGo will put a quick charger near Hwy 138 and Hwy 5 (Lebec?) in the near future, which would make all of this digression unnecessary! (Not that Tehachapi isn't a nice place. :))
I think I just felt my paradigm shift.

2012 SL (One of the colors): 2-year lease, 2012+,
2015 S w/QC (A different color): 3-year lease, 2014+,
2017 SV (Same color as 2015 S): 3-year lease, 2017+, lower monthly than either above(!)

User avatar
paulgipe
Posts: 370
Joined: Sat Aug 02, 2014 4:23 pm
Delivery Date: 20 Oct 2014
Leaf Number: 311200
Location: Bakersfield, CA 93305
Contact: Website

Re: Trip Report: Bakersfield to Tehachapi, California

Mon Feb 23, 2015 6:36 pm

1. I don't think you can make it to the Antelope Valley on that one charge. I wouldn't try it. Tony Williams and others may chime it, but that's more than I'd try.

2. It's pretty level once you leave the pass it's a good 50 miles. You might make one of the two L2 charge stations in Mojave. That might be doable, but unlikely either Lancaster or Palmdale.

3. Yes, there's a DCQC at the Nissan in Bakersfield, but that's not enough. We need one either at the base of the Grapevine (I-5) or at the base of the Tehachapi grade (Hwy 58) or in Tehachapi itself.

5. I just learned today that by mid summer there with be a Chargepoint L2 station in Tehachapi at city hall. (I assume its an L2, no one seems to now for sure.;)

There is a rumor that there could be a DCQC going it at the Grapevine--again that's just a rumor.

Paul
Bakersfield, California
2017 Bolt LT with DCFC, leased 11/09/17
2015 Nissan S with QC, leased, returned
2013 Chevy Volt Premium, used 10/3/16, sold
http://www.wind-works.org

User avatar
paulgipe
Posts: 370
Joined: Sat Aug 02, 2014 4:23 pm
Delivery Date: 20 Oct 2014
Leaf Number: 311200
Location: Bakersfield, CA 93305
Contact: Website

Re: Trip Report: Bakersfield to Tehachapi, California

Mon Feb 23, 2015 6:42 pm

As an addendum. A number of people have gone over the grapevine and their reports are on this forum.

One Bakersfield Leaf owner has posted on plugshare.com the truck charging pedestals at the Flying J truck stop in Lebec. Quite a number of others have charged there for the trip over the grapevine using the Shorepower.com 208 (240?) V, NEMA 14-50 outlets on the pedestal.

We plan to try that leg on Friday for an even in Frazier Park.

Paul
Bakersfield, California
2017 Bolt LT with DCFC, leased 11/09/17
2015 Nissan S with QC, leased, returned
2013 Chevy Volt Premium, used 10/3/16, sold
http://www.wind-works.org

DesertSprings
Posts: 158
Joined: Wed Dec 03, 2014 4:40 pm
Delivery Date: 21 Dec 2014
Leaf Number: 319100
Location: Southern California

Re: Trip Report: Bakersfield to Tehachapi, California

Tue Feb 24, 2015 11:49 am

That's awesome of you. I won't even make the drive into Los Angeles from the IE, because I've found so many DCQC tend to not work when you get to them.

User avatar
paulgipe
Posts: 370
Joined: Sat Aug 02, 2014 4:23 pm
Delivery Date: 20 Oct 2014
Leaf Number: 311200
Location: Bakersfield, CA 93305
Contact: Website

Re: Trip Report: Bakersfield to Tehachapi, California

Tue Feb 24, 2015 1:15 pm

Yes, I've followed that problem on this forum and on plugshare.com too. It's worrisome. But others do use them and report for the most part they're working.

Paul
Bakersfield, California
2017 Bolt LT with DCFC, leased 11/09/17
2015 Nissan S with QC, leased, returned
2013 Chevy Volt Premium, used 10/3/16, sold
http://www.wind-works.org

MichaelBornstein
Posts: 43
Joined: Fri Jan 24, 2014 2:03 pm

Re: Trip Report: Bakersfield to Tehachapi, California

Tue Feb 24, 2015 4:27 pm

paulgipe wrote: Shorepower.com 208 (240?) V, NEMA 14-50 outlets on the pedestal.
Last time I looked, they were NEMA 14-30 outlets on a 30A breaker. People have reported using them at 26-28A. This is why I cut the neutral pin off my 14-50 plug so that it would also fit a 14-30 outlet.

User avatar
paulgipe
Posts: 370
Joined: Sat Aug 02, 2014 4:23 pm
Delivery Date: 20 Oct 2014
Leaf Number: 311200
Location: Bakersfield, CA 93305
Contact: Website

Re: Trip Report: Bakersfield to Tehachapi, California

Tue Feb 24, 2015 6:05 pm

Yes Michael, they are 14-30. Have you driven that route? I was curious why plugshare lists the site at 120 V.

The name plate says 240 V. Has anyone measured it?

Paul
Bakersfield, California
2017 Bolt LT with DCFC, leased 11/09/17
2015 Nissan S with QC, leased, returned
2013 Chevy Volt Premium, used 10/3/16, sold
http://www.wind-works.org

speedski97
Posts: 136
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2014 8:44 pm
Delivery Date: 12 Dec 2013
Location: Whittier Ca

Re: Trip Report: Bakersfield to Tehachapi, California

Thu Apr 16, 2015 7:12 pm

I have made that drive from Bakersfield to Wayside L2 station using L1 stop half way. I have talked to Shore power about installing a charging station at there sites. They need funding for the station and they want to be sure of demand. the wiring is in place for L1, L2 or L3 the hard part is done. the Kiosk is there and working already. If anyone has info on how to get funding, or has an old L2 charger to donate. I am sure the operators would like to hear from you. there contact info Shorepower.com. I would kick in $50 to open this route to Northern California.

HighDesertDriver
Posts: 454
Joined: Thu Jun 30, 2011 7:29 am
Delivery Date: 09 Sep 2011
Leaf Number: 8765
Location: Palmdale, CA

Re: Trip Report: Bakersfield to Tehachapi, California

Fri Apr 17, 2015 8:57 am

paulgipe wrote:1. I don't think you can make it to the Antelope Valley on that one charge. I wouldn't try it. Tony Williams and others may chime it, but that's more than I'd try.

2. It's pretty level once you leave the pass it's a good 50 miles. You might make one of the two L2 charge stations in Mojave. That might be doable, but unlikely either Lancaster or Palmdale.

Paul
Paul, you might check out the shorter route from Tehachapi to the AV on Willow Springs Road. It is close to the glider port and goes through the windmill farms, finishing up on 90th St W. The big advantage is that it is two-lane and you can safely go much slower than the posted speeds on 58 and 14. It still might not be enough, but excepting the initial short climb out of the Tehachapi Valley, it is pretty much downhill all the way. If it would help, you could stop at our home in west Palmdale for a 240V charge, at least enough to get you to the much faster DCQC at AV Nisssan.
2011 Glacier Pearl SL QC
Manf: 8/11 Delivered: 9/9/11
58,900 miles 10/09/15; New 2015 Bat 6/00/15, 55558; 66.14AHr
1BC 6/22/13@28310; 2BC 3/23/14@39750; 3BC 9/30/14@46,292; 4CB 6/12/15@55175, 170-185 G; 43.27AHr
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