GRA
Posts: 11211
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: GCC: Actual fuel economy of cars and light trucks: 1966-2017

Fri Oct 18, 2019 3:34 pm

LeftieBiker wrote:
Fri Oct 18, 2019 3:14 pm
Don't discount the role of advertising in persuading people that they 'want' or 'need' bigger, heavier vehicles. The September 11 attacks caused a society-wide fear in the US that was then used to sell large SUVs. Driving large SUVs then became a norm, with the alternative becoming smaller SUVs and CUVs. People are dumb and impulsive, but auto manufacturers are, at best, amoral.

I wasn't suggesting that advertising has no effect, only pointing out that its effect, while sometimes large, is not overwhelming. When people are paying $600/month for fuel to commute, as was often the case concurrent with the mortgage meltdown in California, no amount of advertising could move the gas hogs off the lots.

We used to have an active topic on when gas would hit $5/gal. That topic died out a few years back, as fuel prices dropped radically and then stayed down. In California, we've been paying $4+ dollars a gallon for gas for the past month or so, but unless it stays there for at least six months we won't see a big shift in car buying patterns. Indeed, my corner station, which had been at $4,20/gal. for regular for several weeks, dropped to $4.00 around Monday.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 11211
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: GCC: Actual fuel economy of cars and light trucks: 1966-2017

Mon Oct 28, 2019 6:18 pm

GRA wrote:
Fri Oct 18, 2019 2:47 pm
Yes, vehicles get bigger or more powerful every generation, because people want just a bit more room or a bit more power than what they had, not because it's all some big government conspiracy. If people didn't want to buy bigger, less fuel-efficient vehicles, they'd all be driving around in Prius' and tiny city cars. . . .

So, while the current generation of almost all models is more fuel efficient than the preceding generation(s), customer tastes have shifted to less efficient vehicle types, i.e. far more CUVs than sedans, which is why fleet fuel efficiency has stagnated.

See
SUVs are 2nd-largest contributor to CO2 increase this decade
https://www.greencarreports.com/news/11 ... his-decade
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

rmay635703
Posts: 536
Joined: Wed Jan 19, 2011 7:43 pm

Re: GCC: Actual fuel economy of cars and light trucks: 1966-2017

Tue Oct 29, 2019 8:54 am

GRA wrote:
Mon Oct 28, 2019 6:18 pm
GRA wrote:
Fri Oct 18, 2019 2:47 pm
Yes, vehicles get bigger or more powerful every generation, because people want just a bit more room or a bit more power than what they had, not because it's all some big government conspiracy. If people didn't want to buy bigger, less fuel-efficient vehicles, they'd all be driving around in Prius' and tiny city cars. . . .

So, while the current generation of almost all models is more fuel efficient than the preceding generation(s), customer tastes have shifted to less efficient vehicle types, i.e. far more CUVs than sedans, which is why fleet fuel efficiency has stagnated.

See
SUVs are 2nd-largest contributor to CO2 increase this decade
https://www.greencarreports.com/news/11 ... his-decade

This again is why car registrations, especially in congested cities
should be roughly affected by what is akin to a luxury tax on specific larger less efficient rigs while leaving an out be it smaller, lighter, more efficient , older, manual XMSN/ base, aka whatever the most effective metrics are so you don’t create a total regressive boondoggle.

Consumer and business behavior is affected by fuel costs alongside outright taxes like registration or personal property taxes.

Nobody likes taxes but if slowly implemented with easily defined rationale, preferably rolled into the lease or loan in the case of vehicles that would get charged
people will eventually accept it as apart of their decision process.

Currently most governments do the opposite viewing small efficient cars as a loss of revenue deserving higher taxes.
This mindset needs to get divorced from the actual needs of a particular area as in the long run you are encouraging more damage and abuse to public resources which in turn encourages higher fees, wash and repeat.

Return to “Environmental Issues”