indyflick
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Re: EVSE Plug Adaptors, Cords and Modifications Info

Thu Oct 07, 2010 6:33 pm

EVDRIVER wrote:
indyflick wrote:
EVDRIVER wrote:Not a big issue as long as no GFI circuits are being used. I will be making one when I get my car.
From scratch or will you be modding an existing EVSE?
It will be an adaptor to supply to an existing portable EVSE or to a home made box with a J inlet and pilot signal.
Way cool post pics when you get it working.

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walterbays
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Re: EVSE Plug Adaptors, Cords and Modifications Info

Sat Nov 20, 2010 10:08 am

One EVSE two cars.

This is the closest thread I could find, and I'm not sure this question deserves a new topic. In a couple of years I can imagine that instead of one Leaf and one ICE, we could have one Leaf and one PHEV (Prius or Volt) in the garage, sharing one EVSE. Maybe even two EV's. Perhaps some others on this forum have already thought about this situation, or better yet, are already doing it today with two NEVs.

Which car do you plug in overnight? The one with the lowest remaining capacity? The one whose driver has the longest earliest trip in the morning? The one whose route does not go past an L3 charging station? Do you start charging one car earlier in the evening (say the PHEV that needs fewer kWh)? And then before you go to bed switch to the EV? Are there any EVSE's with two plugs which can be programmed when to feed which car? After plugging one car into L2, do you then plug the other car into L1 (even during utility peak time) or wait for its turn at L2 (timed for off-peak recharging)? Does the second car push a substantial amount of your electricity usage out of off-peak rates?

Bottom line, if you're charging two cars today, how well is it working out for you in practice? Thanks for your thoughts...
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TimeHorse
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Re: EVSE Plug Adaptors, Cords and Modifications Info

Tue Nov 23, 2010 7:06 am

walterbays wrote:One EVSE two cars.
If you can afford 2 cars in such a short period, I recommend just installing a second EVSE or even just running 2 jacks now and only using one for the LEAF and the second fill with a better EVSE choice, e.g. the Leviton, later. If your breaker can't support it, invest in a bigger box now and again do it all in 1 job. My PU said they can up us to 400A if need be; I'm sure yours is the same.
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LakeLeaf
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Re: EVSE Plug Adaptors, Cords and Modifications Info

Tue Nov 23, 2010 11:21 am

As indyflick says - this is a prime thread for some good pictures. Please post 'em when you get 'em

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garygid
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Re: EVSE Plug Adaptors, Cords and Modifications Info

Tue Mar 08, 2011 10:56 am

There is now a thread for a 120v/240v mod to the Nissan included L1 (120v) EVSE.

Here, we can discuss connectors for adapters, and where to obtain adapters for the SPX, Leviton, Blink, Mod-Nissan-L1, etc. plug-in (movable) EVSE units.

Leviton has some 240v plugs for $5 and $6.

Outstanding Questions:
What connector comes standard on the SPX all-voltage EVSE?

Is a straight in-line plug & socket better then twist-lock for attaching adapters because it might provide strain relief?

Will the common L6-30 twist-lock handle 32 amps and 240v?
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Re: EVSE Plug Adaptors, Cords and Modifications Info

Tue Mar 08, 2011 11:08 am

walterbays wrote:One EVSE two cars.

This is the closest thread I could find, and I'm not sure this question deserves a new topic. In a couple of years I can imagine that instead of one Leaf and one ICE, we could have one Leaf and one PHEV (Prius or Volt) in the garage, sharing one EVSE. Maybe even two EV's. Perhaps some others on this forum have already thought about this situation, or better yet, are already doing it today with two NEVs.

Bottom line, if you're charging two cars today, how well is it working out for you in practice? Thanks for your thoughts...
Just connect two Leviton 16a evse to that 40a AV circuit you had installed
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Re: EVSE Plug Adaptors, Cords and Modifications Info

Tue Mar 08, 2011 11:39 am

EVDRIVER had posted this link to a site which will build custom adapters in another thread, but I don't see it in this thread. So here it is:

http://www.stayonline.com/custom_power_cords.aspx

Note, though, that they won't build an adapter to the NEMA 10-x series (from the others) since it doesn't technically include a ground and the others do. However, from what I've been told by those in the know, it was standard practice with these old plugs to wire (what is labeled as) the neutral pin to ground, and the appliances would use it as both a ground and a neutral. So, you can make such an adapter by connecting ground to neutral on the NEMA 10-x series. And I can confirm that a certain modified EVSE does, indeed, work with such an adapter on my NEMA 10-x series dryer plug. :)

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Re: EVSE Plug Adaptors, Cords and Modifications Info

Tue Mar 08, 2011 12:00 pm

Thanks- that's just what I found on a quick search and you can call them for custom needs, I'm sure there are more out there.

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Re: EVSE Plug Adaptors, Cords and Modifications Info

Sun Mar 13, 2011 2:46 am

Here's the write-up I promised of the "experimental" adapters Phil made for me to use with his L1-to-L2 EVSE mod. His mod replaces the stock connector with a 240v 20a rated NEMA L6-20 connector. He also offers a NEMA L6-20 to NEMA 5-15 (120v) adapter option which I strongly recommend. You'll severely compromise your ability to "emergency charge" without it.

Please reference this chart (below) as it will help explain my comments.

Image

Here's what I've learned about these adapters and wiring in general. Sorry if my comments are a little disjointed, hopefully they make sense. If not, ask...
  • The Nissan L1 EVSE (modified or not) will not function without a ground and will show a trouble light. Thus, you can be comfortable in knowing that it is grounded if it's working at all.
  • 120v circuits use 3 wires (hot, neutral and ground).
  • 240v circuits use 3 wires (hot, hot and ground).
  • Some circuits use 4 wires (hot, hot, neutral and ground) to offer both 120v and 240v in one plug. When using the modified EVSE with this kind of an outlet, the adapter will simply not connect the neutral line to the L6-20 plug side.
  • The modified EVSE uses a standard 240v L6-20 plug as it's "native plug".
  • Because electricity flows between hot and neutral on 120v and between hot and hot on 240v, Phil's optional 120v adapter works by connecting one of the L6-20 hots to the 120v neutral. Because the modified EVSE now has an auto-sensing transformer, this arrangement works just fine. Since 120v and 240v aren't normally compatible, you are unlikely to find this adapter anywhere else, so please do purchase it from Phil as part of your upgrade. :!: Also, do NOT try to use it with anything BUT this upgrade or you're asking for trouble.
  • The red X's in the diagram indicate where similar plugs differ from each other.
  • NEMA 5-15 is the common 120v 15a household plug.
  • NEMA 5-15 and 5-20 are very similar. An unmodified 5-15 plug will also fit a 5-20 outlet.
  • NEMA 6-50 is a common RV plug and is also used for industrial welders and similar equipment.
  • It is common to find 6-50 plugs that allow you to unscrew them and rotate the pin orientation. With this kind of a plug (such as this leviton one), and a screwdriver, you can make an adapter that will fit both 6-30 and 6-50 outlets.
  • If you buy a NEMA 6-30 or 6-50 adapter pre-made, it may not use an adjustable plug type - so double check that or make this one yourself with parts from your local hardware store. Just be sure to use a properly rated wire.
  • NEMA 10-30 and 10-50 are the older style appliance plugs commonly used by older dryers and ranges. Most appliances use both 120v and 240v internally, but this plug does not have separate neutral and ground pins - so the appliances would use the ground as a neutral (which is why the diagrams above label that pin as W). This practice is no longer considered "safe" and modern appliances now use the NEMA 14-30/14-50 outlets instead.
  • However, since the wall outlet side of a 10-30 or 10-50 is typically connected to ground, it is perfectly safe to use the modified EVSE with this outlet since it doesn't need neutral in 240v mode anyway. In the event that you do actually find an outlet that is wired to neutral, the EVSE will not function and will show an error light, so you're safe either way.
  • NEMA 10-30 and 10-50 plugs differ only in the shape of the "neutral/ground" pin. With careful modification using a dremel (or similar tool), one adapter can be made to fit either outlet. Simply remove the X'd out portion.
  • Because 10-30 and 10-50 plugs often use the ground as a neutral (as per above), you are unlikely to find pre-made adapters as most places aren't willing to connect the W pin on it with the G pin on the L6-20. You'll likely have to special order this, or make it yourself. :!: Like the 120v adapter, for safety's sake do NOT use this adapter with anything other than the modified EVSE.
  • NEMA 14-30 and 14-50 are the modern appliance plugs designed to replace the old 10-30 and 10-50 plugs with a safer design that has separate neutral and ground lines. These are also commonly used at campgrounds and some industrial settings.
  • NEMA 14-30, 14-50 and 14-60 plugs differ only in the shape of the neutral pin. Since the modified EVSE doesn't use neutral at all in 240v mode, carefully remove the (X'd out) neutral pin with a dremel (or similar tool) and one adapter will fit all three plug types. To avoid accidental contact between the removed pin and the outlet, cover it with electrical tape.
  • Most residential and industrial 240v outlets are NOT GFCI plugs. If you use an extension cord with this kind of non-GFCI plug, for safety's sake keep the extension cord and the EVSE "brick" indoors. The J plug can safely be used outdoors because the EVSE itself has GFCI protection built in - but that only protects between it and the J plug, not between it and the wall!
Stay Online is a handy place where you get some adapters made for you, as well as a handy L6-20 extension cord. I'm sure you can also find them elsewhere if you look. Feel free to post additional sources to this thread.
There you have it. Between the native plug and 4 carefully made (or modified) adapters, your modified EVSE can fit 10 different plug types. My brother and I have also teamed up to offer these adapters for sale should you not want to make your own. See this thread for details: http://www.mynissanleaf.com/viewtopic.p ... 85&start=0



EDIT: Fixed a typo and added emphasis as per LEAFer's suggestions. Also revised the wording about "properly grounded" as per Wayne.
EDIT 2: Added link to thread where you can buy the adapters.
Last edited by GeekEV on Sat Apr 02, 2011 9:59 pm, edited 4 times in total.

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mwalsh
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Re: EVSE Plug Adaptors, Cords and Modifications Info

Sun Mar 13, 2011 7:47 am

GeekEV wrote:Here's the write-up I promised of the "experimental" adapters Phil made for me to use with his L1-to-L2 EVSE mod. His mod replaces the stock connector with a 240v 20a rated NEMA L6-20 connector. He also offers a NEMA L6-20 to NEMA 5-15 (120v) adapter option which I strongly recommend. You'll severely compromise your ability to "emergency charge" without it.

Please reference this chart (below) as it will help explain my comments.
P.S. I am not an electrician, or an electrical engineer. All of this is information I've gleaned from other electricians or electrical engineers. If you believe something is inaccurate, please PM me and I'll investigate and correct this post. Thanks!
Nice writeup GeekEV! Thanks for taking the time to do it.
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