Bargains on 2023 Leafs

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Playaseeker

New member
Joined
Dec 21, 2023
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4
Hello everyone. First post here. We have a 2016 SV that is being repurchased by Nissan. The whole process will take about four months if it is completed per Nissan's estimates. We were the original owners (80k miles) and our state's laws required a reimbursement, so we got almost everything we paid for the Leaf. We have enjoyed the car for what we used it for (work commute, dog travel and Costco runs) and are pleased with Nissan as a manufacturer. Super reliable car.

We recently got a screaming hot deal on a 2023 Kia Niro EV with 4,000 miles on it. Basically, $15,000 off sticker and it comes with the full remaining warranty. Super nice car with all available options. It is like driving a UFO and we will be learning all the features and programming for months. We will still have a need for a commuter / dog / Costco car and were looking at used Leafs. We can get a two year old one for around $22K, but will most likely make too much money in 2024 to get the tax credit for used EVs. As part of the repurchase, Nissan had given us a VPP code (employee discount) to use for a new Nissan vehicle. I called the local dealer to see what this would do on a 2024 Leaf and he went immediately to "Hey buddy, can I make a deal for you". In essence, a 2023 SV Plus that stickers for $38,045 would end up being $28,700 + taxes, license, registration, etc. I feel a bit of an obligation to Nissan given their treatment of the repurchase (OK, I know the lemon law made them do it) and $29k for a new EV with 200 mile range seems like another "screaming hot deal". Brand new car for about $7k more than a two year old one.

Has anyone had a similar purchase experience? I don't believe there is much of a market for new Leafs at sticker, but don't know if I can beat any more cost savings out of the dealer. Maybe I should wait until 2Q24 when the 2023's having been sitting on the lot for a year. Appreciate any experiences, advice or additional information on the current market for 2023 Nissan Leafs. Thanks
 
Not this experience at all, but we purchased our 2019 SL+ in Colorado with a range of incentives then offered for $27.5k before taxes and tags. Also thought that was a screaming deal. At the time I cross-shopped against the Corolla hatchback and the Mazda 3 hatchback ICE versions, just for comparison sake. The Leaf fell between them after incentives.

We are very happy with our Leaf for our purposes - basically it's an urban corridor runabout, and if used that way, works exceedingly well. We do run snow tires in the winter, and always charge at home, so range anxiety is a complete non-issue for us. In fact, I think we've only once charged all the way to 100%.

Edit: I would add that I work from home 3 days a week, and my wife is disabled, so we don't drive as much anymore.

If you have the resources now, and are comfortable with the fit for your needs, we would certainly jump at that deal.

We do have other vehicles to handle our other transportation needs, as well as free access to Denver area public transit. As always, YMMV. For us, it's mostly a "right tool for the job at an acceptable price" kind of question.

Good luck with your decision.
 
Thanks Front Range. You are like us. Always charge at home and choose our transportation weapon based on the task to be performed. We have a Honda Ridgeline now, but the Kia Niro EV will replace that, so 100% EV soon. I am done buying dinosaur fuel.
 
I would cross-shop the Bolt if the size works for you. It's a little narrower (passengers sit closer together) and trunk/hatch is smaller, but otherwise the same as Leaf. There are lots of good deals on used Bolts right now, and will provide longer range and longer longevity.

A troublesome increasing number of weak cells in cold weather with Leaf. We thought the 40 kWh batteries were good, they're better on degradation but suffering from weak cells and shutting down in the cold. Without active thermal management, degradation is still higher than industry average.

Our 2016 Leaf that got a new 40 kWh battery 3 years ago is about to drop its' first bar. (85%). Never been fast-charged, only driven around town since the battery was new.
 
I have rented both the Niro and the Bolt, and own 2 2019 Pluses. The first one I paid to much (31K), but did better in the 2nd one that has sat for a while (23K) post incentives ( no state program here in IL). Similarly the left over 23s here is on sale for 29K, but the 24s are only being discounted 1-2K.

I liked all three cars. Range on all three cars felt very similar in spite of epa rating difference. The Niro felt a little nicer cabin wise than the Leaf. I have had more issues with ccs on a few rentals than my 4 1/2+ years of Chademo use in the Leaf interestingly enough.

The Leaf has done really well in subzero weather. Less range, but never an issue starting and driving the car.
 
I don't think dealers can demand MSRP anymore, and Nissan has to add ~ $7,500 cash discount to match other EVs that are eligible for the federal tax credit. So my take is that the dealer offer is NOT a screaming hot deal.

$25k would be tempting, if you can stomach NIssan
 
Not this experience at all, but we purchased our 2019 SL+ in Colorado with a range of incentives then offered for $27.5k before taxes and tags. Also thought that was a screaming deal. At the time I cross-shopped against the Corolla hatchback and the Mazda 3 hatchback ICE versions, just for comparison sake. The Leaf fell between them after incentives.

We are very happy with our Leaf for our purposes - basically it's an urban corridor runabout, and if used that way, works exceedingly well. We do run snow tires in the winter, and always charge at home, so range anxiety is a complete non-issue for us. In fact, I think we've only once charged all the way to 100%.

Edit: I would add that I work from home 3 days a week, and my wife is disabled, so we don't drive as much anymore.

If you have the resources now, and are comfortable with the fit for your needs, we would certainly jump at that deal.

We do have other vehicles to handle our other transportation needs, as well as free access to Denver area public transit. As always, YMMV. For us, it's mostly a "right tool for the job at an acceptable price" kind of question.

Good luck with your decision.
I’m curious, how are you able to manage the percentage to which you are charging your leaf? How are you able to charge it less than 100%? Maybe I am a little embarrassed to admit it but I have a 2016 leaf that I have never been able to figure out how to charge less than 100%. Even came on this form asking the question. I have a full battery Upgrade due to battery failure prior to the warranty. And now I’m getting 150 mile range… FWIW. We love the car.
 
I’m curious, how are you able to manage the percentage to which you are charging your leaf? How are you able to charge it less than 100%? Maybe I am a little embarrassed to admit it but I have a 2016 leaf that I have never been able to figure out how to charge less than 100%. Even came on this form asking the question. I have a full battery Upgrade due to battery failure prior to the warranty. And now I’m getting 150 mile range… FWIW. We love the car.
If you use the charge timer, you can charge to the estimated time to reach 80% (or whatever state-of-charge you desire) This isn't exact, but charging with your own level 2 charger, you can refine your estimates and come very close.
 
If you use the charge timer, you can charge to the estimated time to reach 80% (or whatever state-of-charge you desire) This isn't exact, but charging with your own level 2 charger, you can refine your estimates and come very close.
Thanks Douglas but my Charger a Juice Box, has no limiting software. It’s an older model JB.
 
My charger has an app that has the timed charge feature but the app was more trouble than it was worth.
I just use the dashboard readout that gives time to charge to 75% and add 17 minutes.
That pretty much nails the 80% number every time.
I use a handheld stopwatch timer to know when to unplug it.
 
Thanks Douglas but my Charger a Juice Box, has no limiting software. It’s an older model JB.
I meant the charge timer in your LEAF. It works fine as long as you take a little trouble to figure out how long it takes to charge to 80% or whatever you prefer. (BTW, I also leased a '13 and a '16. I got drop dead good deals on the lease in both cases and bought the second one after lease as well. :))
 
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I meant the charge timer in your LEAF. It works fine as long as you take a little trouble to figure out how long it takes to charge to 80% or whatever you prefer. (BTW, I also leased a '13 and a '16. I got drop dead good deals on the lease in both cases and bought the second one after lease as well. :))
Those were GREAT deals back then! When it came time to consider purchasing a new leaf in 2019 at the end of the three-year lease I was amazed at the price increase. It was truly just a little bit more money to purchase the low end Tesla so we simply kept with Nissan as we had the new 150 mile range.
As far as taking the trouble to determine how long it takes to charge… We have a price cut on PG&E grid rates at 11 PM so we don’t start charging until then and that makes it tough to time a charge for reduced percentage capacity. We have solar power on the roof and thus we are eligible for an excellent Power buyback/exchange relationship with, PG&E.
 
Hello everyone. First post here. We have a 2016 SV that is being repurchased by Nissan. The whole process will take about four months if it is completed per Nissan's estimates. We were the original owners (80k miles) and our state's laws required a reimbursement, so we got almost everything we paid for the Leaf. We have enjoyed the car for what we used it for (work commute, dog travel and Costco runs) and are pleased with Nissan as a manufacturer. Super reliable car.

We recently got a screaming hot deal on a 2023 Kia Niro EV with 4,000 miles on it. Basically, $15,000 off sticker and it comes with the full remaining warranty. Super nice car with all available options. It is like driving a UFO and we will be learning all the features and programming for months. We will still have a need for a commuter / dog / Costco car and were looking at used Leafs. We can get a two year old one for around $22K, but will most likely make too much money in 2024 to get the tax credit for used EVs. As part of the repurchase, Nissan had given us a VPP code (employee discount) to use for a new Nissan vehicle. I called the local dealer to see what this would do on a 2024 Leaf and he went immediately to "Hey buddy, can I make a deal for you". In essence, a 2023 SV Plus that stickers for $38,045 would end up being $28,700 + taxes, license, registration, etc. I feel a bit of an obligation to Nissan given their treatment of the repurchase (OK, I know the lemon law made them do it) and $29k for a new EV with 200 mile range seems like another "screaming hot deal". Brand new car for about $7k more than a two year old one.

Has anyone had a similar purchase experience? I don't believe there is much of a market for new Leafs at sticker, but don't know if I can beat any more cost savings out of the dealer. Maybe I should wait until 2Q24 when the 2023's having been sitting on the lot for a year. Appreciate any experiences, advice or additional information on the current market for 2023 Nissan Leafs. Thanks
On what basis did the state require nissan to buy back your Leaf?
 
Not this experience at all, but we purchased our 2019 SL+ in Colorado with a range of incentives then offered for $27.5k before taxes and tags. Also thought that was a screaming deal. At the time I cross-shopped against the Corolla hatchback and the Mazda 3 hatchback ICE versions, just for comparison sake. The Leaf fell between them after incentives.

We are very happy with our Leaf for our purposes - basically it's an urban corridor runabout, and if used that way, works exceedingly well. We do run snow tires in the winter, and always charge at home, so range anxiety is a complete non-issue for us. In fact, I think we've only once charged all the way to 100%.

Edit: I would add that I work from home 3 days a week, and my wife is disabled, so we don't drive as much anymore.

If you have the resources now, and are comfortable with the fit for your needs, we would certainly jump at that deal.

We do have other vehicles to handle our other transportation needs, as well as free access to Denver area public transit. As always, YMMV. For us, it's mostly a "right tool for the job at an acceptable price" kind of question.

Good luck with your decision.
as a second car, usually the leaf does great for me... but now several of my common destinations are just at the outer range for my car... I have to drive my SUV.
 
With respect to how we manage charge level, we let go of any specific number. Whether it charges to 77% or 80% is frankly irrelevant. Close enough. I set it to charge for roughly long enough per the dash display and never worry about the details.

Why would I?

I think there may be a tendency to over-optimize some of these concerns. At the end of the day, it just doesn't matter, practically speaking. I typically vary the charge time +/- about 30 minutes depending on weather and the next few days' driving plans. If we're going farther (like over Christmas, with extra parties and shopping trips), we add 30 minutes or so. Maybe we charge sooner, that is, starting from a higher charge level.

That's it. Range anxiety really isn't a thing for us. Hasn't been since we learned the car, given our usage.

Edit: I should add we typically charge 3x a month. Sometimes 4, but last December with the cold weather and extra trips, we charged 6x. That's a new record for us.
 
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