REALLY!!! $200 gas tax.

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How much TN income tax did you pay? States with income tax can (and do?) use that to repair roads and infrastructure.
We do not have state income tax. This is to make up for gas tax of .21 cents a gallon charged per gallon by the state. I only drive the approximately 1100 miles per year, running errands, ect... so ev owners are being charged for 952 gallons of gas a year. Unfair taxation. I have combustion vehicles (3) and pay at the pump. Ev tax $200 plus $65. Hybrid tax $100 plus $65.
 
I guess we EVers need to pay something but you're right - one size doesn't fit all. Several states are more than $0.21, but e.g. my state (CT) has income tax, car property tax (which went up even though my car depreciated, what, 25%?), and a $0.25 gas tax. I'm not paying what others do for road upkeep etc. I expect something to be done and it will probably be a blanket charge like yours. Fair would be to send odometer readings (how do they verify these?) and be taxed some sub-penny amount per mile.
 
We do not have state income tax. This is to make up for gas tax of .21 cents a gallon charged per gallon by the state. I only drive the approximately 1100 miles per year, running errands, ect... so ev owners are being charged for 952 gallons of gas a year. Unfair taxation. I have combustion vehicles (3) and pay at the pump. Ev tax $200 plus $65. Hybrid tax $100 plus $65.
We have basically the same registration fees in Ohio, surcharged $200 for an EV and $100 for a hybrid above what everyone else pays. Plug-in hybrids caused further debate, think they decided to split the difference at $150 surcharge. One other factor went into this fee scheme, the State also doesn't collect their share of the 18.3 cents/gal Federal Excise Tax on gasoline/diesel fuel. In Ohio, that combined tax is 54.1 cents/gal. so basically the tax equivalent to 370 gal of gasoline. It takes significant mileage to make up for the $200, and definitely favors massive EV pickup trucks over something efficient like a LEAF or TM3.
 
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As hybrids and EVs become a larger segment of the vehicles on the road it is inevitable that some kind of taxing for road and bridge maintenance by mileage driven (and perhaps vehicle weight as done by commercial vehicles) will become the norm.
 
North Carolina state law requires EV owners to pay an additional $140 vehicle registration fee.
I did some research.
 
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I've been trying to urge my California state elected officials do a similar EV "Road Use Tax", but to index it to both miles driven and to the gross vehicle weight, which are the two factors that ACTUALLY damage the roads!

I don't think a Leaf should pay the same tax as a massive Hummer or Cybertruck. And, just as folks who drive their ICE cars less consume less gas and pay less gas tax, the EV tax should match how much we use the roads.

Just as California ICE cars need to get smog tested every other year, EVs should get their odometers read at the same facilities.
 
I am also in NC and recall $140 for mine. That’s based on figures that are unlike my driving patterns. (15k miles per year with something like 25 mpg, was proposed.)

10 years ago I told my state legislator that the fair way to assess it would be to use the mileage gleaned from our annual inspection. We are all required to stay inspected (they kindly “waive” the emissions part of our inspection, ha!). The inspection must be done to pay for the car’s registration. I should have followed it up by calling every legislator and proposing a more reasonable method than one size fits all.

I don’t mind contributing something it wish they’d based it on actual usage. A formula using mileage plus vehicle weight makes much more sense to me.
 
The most equatable way that doesn't involve invasion of privacy would be to "meter" the onboard charger, and have the fast chargers include the road tax in the price. That would be just like the fuel tax is. A reading of Kwh yearly from the OBC and tax based on that. Since fuel tax money is assessed where the fuel is sold, not where the car is driven, (except in big trucks, which must report quarterly where they drove and the tax they paid gets apportioned out to each state) taxing at quick chargers would allow states to get their share as a car is driven on a long trip.
Unfortunately, the states and federal want to move to a GPS system of tax collection for all vehicles, allowing them to vary the tax rate based on time and location of operation, as well as tracking individuals if they so desire. So far it hasn't been successful in getting passed but they keep trying.
The fuel tax has been a fairly successful and unobtrusive way to fund the roads. The more you drive, the heavier you are the more you pay. It has been funding our roads for about 100 years, with the only changes being adjusting the tax rate for inflation and adding tax rates for new fuels as they become more used (propane, compressed natural gas etc).
A tax on Kwh used would be the fairest way to tax an electric without evading the privacy of where and when you drive.
 
A tax on tires would work similarly as fuel.

The downside is even more peeps will drive their tires too long to be safe.

Not like you could get the tax passed, anyway.
Tire tax has a load more problems with it, what if you had a blow-out on a low mile tire? what about switching to snow tires for partial year use? those are just two that come of the top of my head right away.
The fuel tax has been around so long because it works and is almost self administrating. Something similar for electrical use would be also. Hard to get around paying a fuel tax when it is taxed at the rack (distribution point)
The Fairest way is something like the NAFTA fuel tax on trucks, but requires a lot of admin and audits to make sure it is being paid. Not workable for the general public.
Gov has no problem passing taxes, so I wouldn't bet on the last statement. As long as they can make out EV's are the scofflaws, then the general public will not mind any new tax on them.
 
The most equatable way that doesn't involve invasion of privacy would be to "meter" the onboard charger, and have the fast chargers include the road tax in the price. That would be just like the fuel tax is. A reading of Kwh yearly from the OBC and tax based on that. Since fuel tax money is assessed where the fuel is sold, not where the car is driven, (except in big trucks, which must report quarterly where they drove and the tax they paid gets apportioned out to each state) taxing at quick chargers would allow states to get their share as a car is driven on a long trip.
Unfortunately, the states and federal want to move to a GPS system of tax collection for all vehicles, allowing them to vary the tax rate based on time and location of operation, as well as tracking individuals if they so desire. So far it hasn't been successful in getting passed but they keep trying.
The fuel tax has been a fairly successful and unobtrusive way to fund the roads. The more you drive, the heavier you are the more you pay. It has been funding our roads for about 100 years, with the only changes being adjusting the tax rate for inflation and adding tax rates for new fuels as they become more used (propane, compressed natural gas etc).
A tax on Kwh used would be the fairest way to tax an electric without evading the privacy of where and when you drive.
 
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