Need a replacement portable charger

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RogerRDalTx

Active member
Joined
Mar 16, 2024
Messages
25
I need help sorting a problem with my portable charger. Two weeks ago I purchased a 2019 SL Plus from Carvana. I just checked the included portable charger, it's brand new, but a Tesla charger. Since I'm out of the 7-Day return. I need to use their 100-day warranty and want to go into the repair facility knowing what I need.

The Nissan OEM charger works for 120 volt and 240 volt. Is that 240 volt for a European standard plug? Or is it possible to use the OEM charger with the US 220 volt dryer connection for a level 2 charge?

I'm in a condo and will use the complex's level 2 chargers, but I want the option of faster charge with the portable charger if I can get it.

Should I push for a factory OEM charger? Are there newer better options from third parties? What is your recommended replacement charger? Charger prices are anywhere between $150 and nearly $2,000 from my searches. And I have no idea which way to go.

OEM Leaf Portable Charge Cable (120V/240V Evse) Part Number: 296M1-5SA0A
$ 1,878.30
 
I wouldn't buy OEM for Level 2. The Nissan supplied duel voltage charger has limitations that aftermarket do not.
1) it is 240 volt only on level 2 many commercial (condo's, apt buildings) may have 208 volt and the OEM will not work.
2) your "drier" plug shouldn't have an EVSE of higher than 24 amps if the outlet is the std 30 amp outlet.
3) the plug on the Nissan duel voltage unit is 14-50 or a 50 amp plug and will not fit a 30 amp drier outlet.
Many aftermarket EVSE's are adjustable current types, so can be set to whatever is proper for the circuit, and most will operate on between 100 and 240 volts, so would be fine if your building has 208 instead of 240.
My car (bought used) came with a Nissan 120 volt only EVSE and an aftermarket Level 2 unit. I am not holding it out as better or a good buy, it is what was in the trunk, that said there is nothing I have found wrong with it. It is the Primecom 32 amp adjustable rate EVSE.
Before I would spend the money on the EVSE, I would look at the outlet you plan on plugging into, sketch it out the shape or look for the NEMA number on it. Next I would measure the voltage with a meter. If it shows 220 or less, (I have seen 218 on my neighbors unloaded 208, 3 phase line) make sure that the EVSE can be used on that power. IF it is 240 or there abouts, your should be fine with any "single phase" EVSE.
If you are buying a new adjustable EVSE, you should (most cases) be able to order it with the correct plug for your outlet. This is important.
I can't say my Primecom unit will fit your need or not. I know it is adjustable and that it works on 240 volts. I haven't tried to connect it to 120 volts although it is listed as working as low as 100 volts.
I charge my Leaf for 2hr 10 min a night with the current set to 16 amps. That works out to about 7-8 Kwh a night which is around what I use every day.
A few times I needed to go back to town, and bumped up to the full output setting (32 amps on the EVSE) and let the onboard charger max out at its 6 kw output. I am on a 50 supply circuit so that isn't coming close to the max 40 amp continuous allowed on the circuit by the electrical code.
 
Also, what does you condo association have for "Level 2) ? I would think it would be at least a 32 amp if not a 40 amp EVSE, either of those can supply more than the onboard charger can draw, which is limited to around 27.5 amps. You will not get any faster charging on your own EVSE.
The only way to get faster chargeing is VIA the Chademo DC charge port, and condo's wouldn't have one of those.
 
I wouldn't buy OEM for Level 2. The Nissan supplied duel voltage charger has limitations that aftermarket do not.
1) it is 240 volt only on level 2 many commercial (condo's, apt buildings) may have 208 volt and the OEM will not work.
2) your "drier" plug shouldn't have an EVSE of higher than 24 amps if the outlet is the std 30 amp outlet.
3) the plug on the Nissan duel voltage unit is 14-50 or a 50 amp plug and will not fit a 30 amp drier outlet.
Many aftermarket EVSE's are adjustable current types, so can be set to whatever is proper for the circuit, and most will operate on between 100 and 240 volts, so would be fine if your building has 208 instead of 240.
My car (bought used) came with a Nissan 120 volt only EVSE and an aftermarket Level 2 unit. I am not holding it out as better or a good buy, it is what was in the trunk, that said there is nothing I have found wrong with it. It is the Primecom 32 amp adjustable rate EVSE.
Before I would spend the money on the EVSE, I would look at the outlet you plan on plugging into, sketch it out the shape or look for the NEMA number on it. Next I would measure the voltage with a meter. If it shows 220 or less, (I have seen 218 on my neighbors unloaded 208, 3 phase line) make sure that the EVSE can be used on that power. IF it is 240 or there abouts, your should be fine with any "single phase" EVSE.
If you are buying a new adjustable EVSE, you should (most cases) be able to order it with the correct plug for your outlet. This is important.
I can't say my Primecom unit will fit your need or not. I know it is adjustable and that it works on 240 volts. I haven't tried to connect it to 120 volts although it is listed as working as low as 100 volts.
I charge my Leaf for 2hr 10 min a night with the current set to 16 amps. That works out to about 7-8 Kwh a night which is around what I use every day.
A few times I needed to go back to town, and bumped up to the full output setting (32 amps on the EVSE) and let the onboard charger max out at its 6 kw output. I am on a 50 supply circuit so that isn't coming close to the max 40 amp continuous allowed on the circuit by the electrical code.
Thank you for your advice and for taking the time to reply to my question. My takeaway from your answer is that there are better options than the OEM charger, and probably less expensive.

My current living situation is a rental condo and there's no way to charge my leaf from the apartment. I currently use level 2 chargers in the complex. What I was looking for is future flexibility when I'm no longer living here or if I'm on a road trip and can adapt a portable charger to someone's typical us dryer connection for something faster than 110 volt 1 kilowatt an hour trickle charge.

I'm looking for flexibility with a portable charger, hopefully not too large, that will live in the car's trunk. I just don't know what to buy. EVdance, split volt, lectron and megear are brands that frequently come up.
 
https://www.primecom.tech/collectio...ectric-vehicle-ev-charger-amperage-adjustable
This is the unit I have.
The problem you can face is having the correct plug on the charger for the outlet where you find yourself. If you are handy you can make up safe adapters if you understand the risks and will be religious about matching the rate on the EVSE to the load allowed by the code on the circuit.
I would either buy with a NEMA 14-50 plug and make my own adapter or see if they will sell replaceable cord ends in 10,20 and 30 amp styles.
10 amp is good on a 15 amp outlet, 16 amp on a 20, 24 amp on a 30 and 32 amps on a 40 or 50 amp branch circuit.
The risk is: if you don't reset when you hook up, you can overload the circuit, at best that will mean tripped breakers, but can lead to overheated wires and a fire.
 
Also, what does you condo association have for "Level 2) ? I would think it would be at least a 32 amp if not a 40 amp EVSE, either of those can supply more than the onboard charger can draw, which is limited to around 27.5 amps. You will not get any faster charging on your own EVSE.
The only way to get faster chargeing is VIA the Chademo DC charge port, and condo's wouldn't have one of those.
My complex has two chargepoint network chargers at 6.6 KW an hour billed at $0.19 a kilowatt hour. Those will provide 95% of my charging needs as long as I live in my current unit . Again, this is about having a portable charger I can use when traveling and purchasing one with the maximum flexibility for 220 outlets in different locations. I read a lot of threads on chargers and there's conflicting information with a variety of different third-party chargers.
 
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